HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

The Ashes
The Ashes is a Test cricket series played between England cricket team">England and Australia national cricket team">Australia. The Ashes are regarded as being held by the team that most recently won the Test series. If the test series is drawn, the team that currently holds the Ashes retains the trophy. The term originated in a satirical obituary published in a British newspaper, The Sporting Times, immediately after Australia's Test cricket from 1877 to 1883">1882 victory at The Oval, their first Test win on English soil. The obituary stated that English cricket had died, and "the body will be cremated and the ashes taken to Australia". The mythical ashes immediately became associated with the Test cricket from 1877 to 1883">1882–83 series played in Australia, before which the English captain Ivo Bligh had vowed to "regain those ashes"
[...More...]

Morning Post
The Morning Post was a conservative daily newspaper published in London from 1772 to 1937, when it was acquired by The Daily Telegraph.

Australian Bicentenary
The bicentenary of Australia was celebrated in 1988. It marked 200 years since the arrival of the First Fleet of British convict ships at Sydney in 1788
[...More...]

Replica
A replica is an exact reproduction, such as of a painting, as it was executed by the original artist or a copy or reproduction, especially one on a scale smaller than the original. A replica is a copying closely resembling the original concerning its shape and appearance. An inverted replica complements the original by filling its gaps. It can be a copy used for historical purposes, such as being placed in a museum. Sometimes the original never existed. Replicas and reproductions can be related to any form of licensing an image for others to use, whether it is through photos, postcards, prints, miniature or full size copies they represent a resemblance of the original object. "Not all incorrectly attributed items are intentional forgeries
[...More...]

Marylebone Cricket Club
Marylebone Cricket Club, generally known as the MCC, is a cricket club founded in 1787 and based since 1814 at Lord's cricket ground, which it owns, in St John's Wood, London, England. The club's own teams are essentially ad hoc because they have never taken part in any formal competition. MCC teams held important match status from 1787 to 1894; and first-class status from 1895. To mark the beginning of each English season in April, MCC hosts the reigning County Champions. In 1788, the MCC took responsibility for the Laws of Cricket, issuing a revised version that year
[...More...]

Bail (cricket)
In the sport of cricket, a bail is one of the two smaller sticks placed on top of the three stumps to form a wicket
[...More...]

Australian Cricket Team In England And The United States In 1882
Australians (/əˈstrliən/), colloquially known as Aussies (/ˈɒzi/), are people associated with Australia, sharing a common history, culture, and language (Australian English). Present-day Australians are citizens of the Commonwealth of Australia, governed by its nationality law. The majority of Australians descend from the peoples of the British Isles. The Colony of New South Wales was established by the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1788, with the arrival of the First Fleet, and five other colonies were established in the early 19th century, now forming the six present-day Australian states. Many early settlements were penal colonies, and transported convicts (and, later, ex-convicts) made up a significant proportion of the population in most colonies. Large-scale immigration did not occur until the 1850s, following a series of gold rushes
[...More...]

picture info

Melbourne
Melbourne (/ˈmɛlbərn/ locally [ˈmɛɫbn̩] (About this sound listen)) is the Australian capital cities">state capital and most populous city of the Australian state of Victoria, and the Australia by population">second-most populous city in Australia and Oceania. The name "Melbourne" covers an urban agglomeration spanning 9,992.5 km2---> (3,858.1 sq mi), which comprises the broader metropolitan area, as well as being the common name for Melbourne City Centre">its city centre. The metropolis is located on the large natural bay of Port Phillip and expands into the hinterlands towards the Dandenong and Macedon mountain ranges, Mornington Peninsula and Yarra Valley
[...More...]

Cricket Pitch
In the game of cricket, the cricket pitch consists of the central strip of the cricket field between the wickets – 1 chain or 22 yards (20.12 m) long and 10 feet (3.05 m) wide. The surface is flat and normally covered with extremely short grass though this grass is soon removed by wear at the ends of the pitch. In amateur matches in some parts of the world, artificial pitches are sometimes used. These can be a slab of concrete, overlaid with a coir mat, artificial turf, sometimes dirt is put over the coir mat to provide an authentic feeling pitch. Artificial pitches are rare in professional cricket, being used only when exhibition matches are played in regions where cricket is not a common sport. The pitch has specific markings delineating the creases, as specified by the Laws of Cricket. The word wicket often occurs in reference to the pitch
[...More...]

Innings
An innings is one of the divisions of a cricket match during which one team takes its turn to bat. Innings also means the period in which an individual player bats
[...More...]

Gamesmanship
Gamesmanship is the use of dubious (although not technically illegal) methods to win or gain a serious advantage in a game or sport. It has been described as "Pushing the rules to the limit without getting caught, using whatever dubious methods possible to achieve the desired end". It may be inferred that the term derives from the idea of playing for the game (i.e., to win at any cost) as opposed to sportsmanship, which derives from the idea of playing for sport. The term was popularized by Stephen Potter's humorous 1947 book, The Theory and Practice of Gamesmanship (or the Art of Winning Games without Actually Cheating)
[...More...]

Ted Peate
Edmund ("Ted") Peate (1855–1900) was an English professional cricketer who played for Yorkshire and England.

picture info

Punch (magazine)
Punch; or, The London Charivari was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire established in 1841 by Henry Mayhew and engraver Ebenezer Landells. Historically, it was most influential in the 1840s and 1850s, when it helped to coin the term "cartoon" in its modern sense as a humorous illustration. After the 1940s, when its circulation peaked, it went into a long decline, closing in 1992
[...More...]

C. W. Alcock
Charles William ″C.W.″ Alcock (2 December 1842 – 26 February 1907) was an influential English sportsman and administrator
[...More...]

International Cricket Council
The International Cricket Council (ICC) is the international governing body of cricket. It was founded as the Imperial Cricket Conference in 1909 by representatives from England, Australia and South Africa, renamed the International Cricket Conference in 1965, and took up its current name in 1989. The ICC has 104 members: 12 Full Members that play Test matches and 92 Associate Members. The ICC is responsible for the organisation and governance of cricket's major international tournaments, most notably the Cricket World Cup. It also appoints the umpires and referees that officiate at all sanctioned Test matches, One Day International and Twenty20 Internationals. It promulgates the ICC Code of Conduct, which sets professional standards of discipline for international cricket, and also co-ordinates action against corruption and match-fixing through its Anti-Corruption and Security Unit (ACSU)
[...More...]