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The Art Journal
The Art
Art
Journal, published in London, was the most important Victorian magazine on art. It was founded in 1839[1] by Hodgson & Graves, print publishers, 6 Pall Mall, with the title the Art
Art
Union Monthly Journal (or The Art
Art
Union), the first issue of 750 copies appearing 15 February 1839.Contents1 History 2 Editorship 3 Contributors 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Hodgson & Graves hired Samuel Carter Hall
Samuel Carter Hall
as editor, assisted by James Dafforne. Hall soon became principal proprietor, but he was unable to turn a profit on his own. The London
London
publisher George Virtue then purchased into Hall's Art
Art
Union Monthly Journal in 1848, retaining Hall as editor
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Frederick William Fairholt
Frederick William Fairholt (1814 – 3 April 1866) was an English antiquary and wood engraver.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Later life 4 Legacy 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] He was born in London. His father, who was of a German family (the name was originally Fahrholz), was a tobacco manufacturer, and Frederick was at first employed in the business. He then worked as a drawing-master, and later as a scene-painter. Ink copies made by him of figures from William Hogarth's plates led to his being employed by Charles Knight on several of his illustrated publications. Career[edit] His first published literary work was a contribution to Hone's Year-Book in 1831. His life was one of almost uninterrupted quiet labour, carried on until within a few days of death. Several works on civic pageantry and some collections of ancient unpublished songs and dialogues were edited by him for the Percy Society in 1842
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Llewellynn Jewitt
Llewellynn Frederick William Jewitt (or Llewellyn) (24 November 1816 – 5 June 1886) was a noted illustrator, engraver, natural scientist and author of The Ceramic Art of Great Britain (1878). His output was prodigious and covered a large range of interests.Contents1 Biography 2 Books 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Jewitt was born at Kimberworth, Rotherham, the seventeenth and final child of artist, author and schoolmaster Arthur Jewitt and his wife Martha. His education, largely from his father, who was master at Kimberworth Endowed School, started in Duffield, Derbyshire where his family moved in 1818.[1] On Christmas Day of 1838 he married Elizabeth Sage, daughter of Isaac Sage of Derby, hurriedly returning to London the same day so as not to fall behind in his work
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Thomas Wright (antiquarian)
Thomas Wright (23 April 1810 – 23 December 1877) was an English antiquarian and writer.Contents1 Life 2 Selected works 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Wright was born near Ludlow, Shropshire, descended from a Quaker family formerly living at Bradford. He was educated at Ludlow Grammar School and at Trinity College, Cambridge, whence he graduated in 1834.[1] While at Cambridge he contributed to the Gentleman's Magazine and other periodicals, and in 1835 he came to London to devote himself to a literary career. His first separate work was Early English Poetry in Black Letter, with Prefaces and Notes (1836, 4 vols. 12mo), which was followed during the next forty years by an extensive series of publications, many of lasting value. He helped to found the British Archaeological Association and the Percy, Camden and Shakespeare Societies
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Impressionism
Impressionism is a 19th-century art movement characterised by relatively small, thin, yet visible brush strokes, open composition, emphasis on accurate depiction of light in its changing qualities (often accentuating the effects of the passage of time), ordinary subject matter, inclusion of movement as a crucial element of human perception and experience, and unusual visual angles. Impressionism originated with a group of Paris-based artists whose independent exhibitions brought them to prominence during the 1870s and 1880s. The Impressionists faced harsh opposition from the conventional art community in France
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Victorian Era
In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era
Victorian era
was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. The era followed the Georgian period and preceded the Edwardian period, and its later half overlaps with the first part of the Belle Époque
Belle Époque
era of continental Europe. Defined according to sensibilities and political concerns, the period is sometimes considered to begin with the passage of the Reform Act 1832
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Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
(later known as the Pre-Raphaelites) was a group of English painters, poets, and critics, founded in 1848 by William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais
John Everett Millais
and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. The three founders were joined by William Michael Rossetti, James Collinson, Frederic George Stephens
Frederic George Stephens
and Thomas Woolner
Thomas Woolner
to form the seven-member "brotherhood"
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Leslie Stephen
Sir Leslie Stephen
Leslie Stephen
KCB (28 November 1832 – 22 February 1904) was an English author, critic, historian, biographer, and mountaineer, and father of Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
and Vanessa Bell.Contents1 Life1.1 Marriage1.1.1 (1) Harriet (Minny) Thackeray 1867–1875 1.1.2 (2) Julia Duckworth
Julia Duckworth
1878–18951.2 Career 1.3 Mountaineering2 List of selected publications 3 Death 4 Family tree 5 References 6 Bibliography6.1 Anne Thackeray
Anne Thackeray
Ritchie7 External links7.1 External imagesLife[edit] Sir Leslie Stephen
Leslie Stephen
came from a distinguished intellectual family,[1] and was born at 14 (later renumbered 42) Hyde Park Gate, Kensington
Kensington
in London, the son of Sir James Stephen and (Lady) Jane Catherine (née Venn) Stephen
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Titian
Tiziano Vecelli or Tiziano Vecellio (pronounced [titˈtsjaːno veˈtʃɛlljo]; c. 1488/1490[1] – 27 August 1576),[2] known in English as Titian
Titian
/ˈtɪʃən/, was an Italian painter, the most important member of the 16th-century Venetian school. He was born in Pieve di Cadore, near Belluno
Belluno
(in Veneto, Republic of Venice).[3] During his lifetime he was often called da Cadore, taken from the place of his birth. Recognized by his contemporaries as "The Sun Amidst Small Stars" (recalling the famous final line of Dante's Paradiso), Titian
Titian
was one of the most versatile of Italian painters, equally adept with portraits, landscape backgrounds, and mythological and religious subjects
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Raphael
Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino[2] (Italian: [raffaˈɛllo ˈsantsjo da urˈbiːno]; March 28 or April 6, 1483 – April 6, 1520),[3] known as Raphael
Raphael
(/ˈræfeɪəl/, US: /ˈræfiəl, ˌrɑːfaɪˈɛl/), was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. His work is admired for its clarity of form, ease of composition, and visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur.[4] Together with Michelangelo
Michelangelo
and Leonardo da Vinci, he forms the traditional trinity of great masters of that period.[5] Raphael
Raphael
was enormously productive, running an unusually large workshop and, despite his death at 37, leaving a large body of work. Many of his works are found in the Vatican Palace, where the frescoed Raphael Rooms were the central, and the largest, work of his career
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Old Master
In art history, "Old Master" (or "old master")[1][2] refers to any painter of skill who worked in Europe before about 1800, or a painting by such an artist. An "old master print" is an original print (for example an engraving or etching) made by an artist in the same period. The term "old master drawing" is used in the same way. In theory, "Old Master" applies only to artists who were fully trained, were Masters of their local artists' guild, and worked independently, but in practice, paintings produced by pupils or workshops are often included in the scope of the term
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Sidney Lee
Sir Sidney Lee
Sidney Lee
FBA (5 December 1859 – 3 March 1926) was an English biographer, writer and critic.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Lee was born Solomon Lazarus Lee in 1859 at 12 Keppel Street, Bloomsbury, London. He was educated at the City of London
London
School and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he graduated in modern history in 1882. In 1883, Lee became assistant-editor of the Dictionary of National Biography. In 1890 he became joint editor, and on the retirement of Sir Leslie Stephen
Leslie Stephen
in 1891, succeeded him as editor. Lee wrote over 800 articles in the Dictionary, mainly on Elizabethan authors or statesmen. His sister Elizabeth Lee also contributed. While still at Balliol, Lee had written two articles on Shakespearean questions, which were printed in The Gentleman's Magazine
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Magazine
A magazine is a publication, usually a periodical publication, which is printed or electronically published (sometimes referred to as an online magazine). Magazines are generally published on a regular schedule and contain a variety of content. They are generally financed by advertising, by a purchase price, by prepaid subscriptions, or a combination of the three. At its root, the word "magazine" refers to a collection or storage location. In the case of written publication, it is a collection of written articles
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Dictionary Of National Biography
The Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published from 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.Contents1 First series 2 Supplements and revisions 3 Concise dictionary 4 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography 5 First series contents 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksFirst series[edit] Hoping to emulate national biographical collections published elsewhere in Europe, such as the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (1875), in 1882 the publisher George Smith (1824–1901), of Smith, Elder & Co., planned a universal dictionary that would include biographical entries on individuals from world history. He approached Leslie Stephen, then editor of the Cornhill Magazine, owned by Smith, to become the editor
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