HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Thames Street, London
Thames Street, divided into Lower and Upper Thames Street, is a road in the City of London, the historic and financial centre of London.[1] It forms part of the busy A3211 route (prior to being rebuilt as a major thoroughfare in the late 1960s, it was the B132) from Tower Hill to Westminster. The London Bridge
London Bridge
underpass marks the divide between Upper and Lower Thames Street, with Lower to the east and Upper to the west. History[edit] Thames Street is mentioned in the diary of Samuel Pepys. The first mention of the road, however, is from 1013 when the Custom-house was founded on the street.[2][3] During the reign of King Henry VIII, the street contained the London
London
residences of many courtiers, including that of William Compton, where Henry VIII allegedly met his mistresses.[4] In the culture of the twentieth-century, the street is probably best remembered for its place in T. S
[...More...]

"Thames Street, London" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

London Bridge
Coordinates: 51°30′29″N 0°05′16″W / 51.50806°N 0.08778°W / 51.50806; -0.08778London Bridge London Bridge
London Bridge
in 2006Coordinates 51°30′29″N 0°05′16″W / 51.50806°N 0.08778°W / 51.50806; -0.08778Carries Five lanes of the A3Crosses River ThamesLocale Central LondonMaintained by Bridge House Estates, City of London
[...More...]

"London Bridge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

London Fire Brigade
The London
London
Fire Brigade (LFB) is the statutory fire and rescue service for London
[...More...]

"London Fire Brigade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
[...More...]

"OCLC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Timbs
John Timbs
John Timbs
(/tɪmz/; 17 August 1801 – 6 March 1875) was an English author and antiquary.[1] Some of his work was published under the pseudonym of Horace Welby.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Timbs was born in 1801 in Clerkenwell, London. He was educated at a private school at Hemel Hempstead. In his sixteenth year he was apprenticed to a druggist and printer at Dorking. He had early shown literary capacity, and when nineteen began to write for the Monthly Magazine. A year later he became secretary to Sir Richard Phillips, its proprietor, and permanently adopted literature as a profession. He was successively editor of the Mirror of Literature, the Harlequin, The Literary World, and sub-editor of the Illustrated London News. He was also founder and first editor of Year-Book of Science and Art
[...More...]

"John Timbs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

2012 Summer Paralympics
The 2012 Summer Paralympics, the 14th Summer Paralympic Games, and also more generally known as the London
London
2012 Paralympic Games, were a major international multi-sport event for athletes with disabilities governed by the International Paralympic Committee
[...More...]

"2012 Summer Paralympics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

2012 Summer Olympics
The 2012 Summer Olympics, formally the Games of the XXX Olympiad[1] and commonly known as London
London
2012, was a major international multi-sport event celebrated in the tradition of the Olympic Games, as governed by the International Olympic Committee
International Olympic Committee
(IOC). It took place in London
London
and to a lesser extent across the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
from 27 July to 12 August 2012
[...More...]

"2012 Summer Olympics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

2012 Olympic Marathon Course
The 2012 Olympic Marathon
Marathon
Course is that of both the men's and women's marathon races at the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games in London. The 42.195-kilometre (26.219-mile) route consists of one short circuit of 3.571 kilometres (2.219 miles) followed by three circuits of 12.875 kilometres (8.0 miles). The course, which was designed to pass many of London's well-known landmarks, starts and finishes on The Mall, within sight of Buckingham Palace, and extends as far as the Tower of London in the east and the Victoria Memorial in the west. The route of the marathon had been changed, for various logistical reasons, from that originally envisaged in London's original 2005 bid for the Games and broke with the normal Olympic tradition that the race finishes inside the main Olympic Stadium. The 2012 Summer Olympics
2012 Summer Olympics
was the third to be held in London
[...More...]

"2012 Olympic Marathon Course" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Puddle Dock
Puddle Dock, in Blackfriars in the City of London, was formerly the site of one of London's docks. It is now a minor street and the site of the Mermaid Theatre which closed in 2003. The area was dramatically altered by major works in the 1960s, involving the reclaiming of foreshore of the River Thames at Puddle Dock and the rebuilding of Upper Thames Street as a major traffic thoroughfare. Today its name survives as the name of a street connecting Upper Thames Street and Queen Victoria Street. Berkeley's Inn, the town house of the Barons Berkeley of Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire, stood nearby, at the south end of Adle Street, against 'Puddle Wharf', as reported in 1598 by John Stow in his Survey of London, at which date the house had been abandoned by the family and had been split up into multiple-occupation apartments, in a dilapidated state. Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick, son-in-law of Thomas de Berkeley, 5th Baron Berkeley, lodged in this house, in the parish of St
[...More...]

"Puddle Dock" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Foreshore
The intertidal zone, also known as the foreshore and seashore and sometimes referred to as the littoral zone, is the area that is above water at low tide and under water at high tide (in other words, the area between tide marks). This area can include many different types of habitats, with many types of animals, such as starfish, sea urchins, and numerous species of coral.Bancao Beach
Beach
at Low Tide
Tide
showing Intertidal Zone from about 200 m from the beachThe well-known area also includes steep rocky cliffs, sandy beaches, or wetlands (e.g., vast mudflats). The area can be a narrow strip, as in Pacific islands that have only a narrow tidal range, or can include many meters of shoreline where shallow beach slopes interact with high tidal excursion
[...More...]

"Foreshore" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Blitz
The Blitz
The Blitz
was a German bombing offensive against Britain in 1940 and 1941, during the Second World War
[...More...]

"The Blitz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

City Of London
The City of London
London
is a city and county that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district (CBD) of London. It constituted most of London
London
from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the agglomeration has since grown far beyond the City's borders.[3][4] The City is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of London, though it remains a notable part of central London. Administratively, it forms one of the 33 local authority districts of Greater London; however, the City of London
London
is not a London
London
borough, a status reserved for the other 32 districts (including London's only other city, the City of Westminster)
[...More...]

"City Of London" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman House At Billingsgate
The Roman house at Billingsgate
Roman house at Billingsgate
is the archaeological site of a house from Londinium
Londinium
(Roman London). The best preserved parts of the house are a bath with hypocausts. The ruins were discovered in 1848 while the Coal Exchange was built on the site. The remains were preserved and were visible in the cellar of the building. In 1967 to 1970, the Coal Exchange was replaced by another building and the Lower Thames Street was enlarged. Further excavations were made at the site and the remains were incorporated into the cellar of the new building, but were not open to the public. Pottery has shown that the Roman house was erected in the late 2nd century and had at this time a north and an east wing around a courtyard. There was most likely also a west wing but nothing of it survived
[...More...]

"Roman House At Billingsgate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.