HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Texas Governor
The Governor of Texas
Texas
is the chief executive of the U.S. State
U.S. State
of Texas, the presiding officer over the executive branch of the Government of Texas, and the commander-in-chief of the Texas
Texas
National Guard, the State's militia. The governor has the power to consider bills passed by the Texas
Texas
Legislature, by signing them into law, or vetoing them, and in bills relating to appropriations, the power of a line-item veto. He may convene the legislature, and grant pardons and reprieves,[2] except in cases of impeachment, and upon the permission of the legislature, in cases of treason. The State provides an official residence, the Governor's Mansion in Austin
[...More...]

picture info

Republican Party (United States)
The Republican Party, commonly referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being its historic rival, the Democratic Party. The party is named after republicanism, the dominant value during the American Revolution. Founded by anti-slavery activists, economic modernizers, ex Whigs and ex Free Soilers in 1854, the Republicans dominated politics nationally and in the majority of northern states for most of the period between 1860 and 1932.[16] The Republican Party originally championed classical liberal ideas, including anti-slavery and economic reforms.[17][18] The party was usually dominant over the Democrats during the Third Party System
Third Party System
and Fourth Party System. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
formed the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party after being rejected by the GOP and ran as a candidate
[...More...]

picture info

Texas Senate
Majority  Republican (20)Minority  Democratic (11)Length of term4 yearsAuthority Article 3, Texas
Texas
ConstitutionSalary $7,200/year + per diemElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-postLast electionNovember 8, 2016 (16 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (15 seats)Redistricting Legislative ControlMeeting placeState Senate Chamber Texas
Texas
State Capitol Austin, TexasWebsite Texas
Texas
State SenateInside view of the Texas
Texas
SenateThe Texas
Texas
Senate is the upper house of the Texas
Texas
State Legislature. There are 31 members of the Senate, representing single-member districts across the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Texas, with populations of approximately 806,000 per constituency, based on the 2010 U.S
[...More...]

picture info

Secession In The United States
In the context of the United States, secession primarily refers to the withdrawal of one or more States from the Union that constitutes the United States; but may loosely refer to leaving a State or territory to form a separate territory or new State, or to the severing of an area from a city or county within a State. Threats and aspirations to secede from the United States, or arguments justifying secession, have been a feature of the country's politics almost since its birth. Some have argued for secession as a constitutional right and others as from a natural right of revolution. In Texas
Texas
v
[...More...]

picture info

American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
[...More...]

picture info

Reconstruction Era Of The United States
The Reconstruction
Reconstruction
era was the period from 1863 (the legal end of most slavery in the United States) or 1865 (the end of the Confederacy) to 1877. In the context of the history of the United States, the term has two applications: the first applies to the complete history of the entire country from 1865 to 1877 following the Civil War; the second, to the attempted transformation of the 11 ex-Confederate states from 1863 to 1877, as directed by Congress. Reconstruction
Reconstruction
ended the remnants of Confederate nationalism and of slavery, making the Freedmen
Freedmen
citizens with civil rights apparently guaranteed by three new Constitutional amendments
[...More...]

Term Limit
A term limit is a legal restriction that limits the number of terms an officeholder may serve in a particular elected office. When term limits are found in presidential and semi-presidential systems they act as a method to curb the potential for monopoly, where a leader effectively becomes "president for life". This is intended to protect a democracy from becoming a de facto dictatorship. Sometimes, there is an absolute limit on the number of terms an officeholder can serve, while, in other cases, the restrictions are merely on the number of consecutive terms.Contents1 History1.1 Ancient 1.2 Modern2 Types 3 Notable examples3.1 Relaxed term limits 3.2 Tightened term limits 3.3 People who would have run afoul of modern term limits4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Ancient[edit] Term limits have a long history
[...More...]

picture info

President Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
[...More...]

picture info

Beauford Jester
Beauford Halbert Jester (January 12, 1893 – July 11, 1949) was the 36th Governor of Texas, serving from 1947 until 1949, when he died of a heart attack aboard a train. He is the only Texas
Texas
governor ever to have died in office. Jester was the son of George Taylor Jester. History[edit] He won the governorship in the Democratic primary in a run-off election in 1946 by defeating Homer Rainey, who had been discharged by the regents as the president of the University of Texas
Texas
at Austin in 1944 in a dispute over academic freedom. As governor Jester created the Board of Texas
Texas
State Hospitals and Special
Special
Schools, the Texas
Texas
Youth Development Council, and reformed the state prison system
[...More...]

picture info

Democratic Party (United States)
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

[...More...]

Unionist Party (United States)
The Unionist Party, later re-named Unconditional Unionist Party, was a political party started after the Compromise of 1850
Compromise of 1850
to define politicians who supported the Compromise. Members included Southern Democrats who were loyal to the Union as well as elements of the old Whig Party and other factions opposed to a separate Southern Confederacy. It was used primarily as label by Southerners who did want to affiliate with the Republicans, or wished to win over anti-secession Democrats.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 During Civil War 1.3 Diffusion and decline2 Lists of Unionists 3 Electoral history3.1 Presidential elections 3.2 Congress elections4 See also 5 References 6 NotesHistory[edit] Origins[edit] The label first appeared 1850 during the dispute over the Compromise of 1850
[...More...]

picture info

Admission To The Union
The Admission to the Union
Admission to the Union
Clause of the United States
United States
Constitution, oftentimes called the New States Clause, and found at Article IV, Section 3, Clause 1, authorizes the Congress to admit new states into the United States
United States
beyond the thirteen already in existence at the time the Constitution went into effect. The Constitution went into effect on June 21, 1788, after ratification by 9 of the 13 states, and the federal government began operations under it on March 4, 1789.[1] Since then, 37 additional states have been admitted into the Union. Each new state has been admitted on an equal footing with those already in existence.[2] Of the 37 states admitted to the Union by Congress, all but six have been established within an existing U.S. organized incorporated territory. A state so created might encompass all or a portion of a territory
[...More...]

Independent (politics)
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
[...More...]

picture info

Texas Gubernatorial Election, 1845
James Pinckney Henderson IndependentElections in TexasFederal governmentPresidential elections1848 1852 1856 1860 1872 1876 1880 1884 1888 1892 1896 1900 1904 1908 1912 1916 1920 1924 1928 1932 1936 1940 1944 1948 1952 1956 1960 1964 1968 1972 1976 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 2012 2016Presidential primaries and caucusesDemocratic2008Republican2008 2012 United States Senate
United States Senate
elections1970 1972 1976 1978 1982 1984 1988 1990 1994 1996 2000 2002 2006 2008 20
[...More...]

picture info

Republic Of Texas
French and German Native languages (Caddo, Comanche) and Portuguese regionallyGovernment Constitutional republicPresident1 •  1836 David G. Burnet •  1836–38 Sam Houston, 1st term •  1838–41 Mirabeau B. Lamar •  1841–44 Sam Houston, 2nd term •  1844–46 Anson JonesVice President1 •  1836 Lorenzo de Zavala •  1836–38 Mirabeau B. Lamar •  1838–41 David G. Burnet •  1841–44 Edward Burleson •  1844–45 Kenneth L
[...More...]

.