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Territories Of The United States
Territories of the United States
United States
are sub-national administrative divisions directly overseen by the United States
United States
(U.S.) federal government. Unlike U.S. states
U.S. states
and Native tribes that have sovereignty alongside the federal government, territories are without sovereignty (according to a 2016 Supreme Court
Supreme Court
ruling called Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico
v. Sanchez Valle).[2] The territories are classified by whether they are "incorporated" (i.e., part of the U.S. proper) and whether they have an "organized" government through an Organic Act
Organic Act
passed by the U.S. Congress.[3] The U.S
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List Of Populated Places In Guam
The United States
United States
territory of Guam
Guam
is divided into nineteen municipalities, called villages. Each village is governed by an elected mayor. Village populations range in size from under 1,000 to over 40,000. As of the 2000 census, the total population of Guam
Guam
was 154,805.[1]Contents1 History 2 List of villages 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Many villages have rich histories reaching back thousands of years. Artifacts from ancient Chamorro settlements can be found in every village of Guam
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Demonym
A demonym (/ˈdɛmənɪm/; δῆμος dẽmos "people, tribe", ὄόνομα ónoma "name") is a word that identifies residents or natives of a particular place, which is derived from the name of that particular place.[1] It is a neologism (i.e., a recently minted term); previously gentilic was recorded in English dictionaries, e.g., the Oxford
Oxford
English Dictionary and Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary.[2][3][4] Examples of demonyms include Swahili for a person of the Swahili coast and Cochabambino for a person from the city of Cochabamba. Demonyms do not always clearly distinguish place of origin or ethnicity from place of residence or citizenship, and many demonyms overlap with the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group of a region
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Donald Trump
President of the United States Incumbent PresidencyTransition Inauguration Timeline Executive actionsProclamationsPolls Protests TripsAppointmentsCabinetformationAmbassadors Federal judgesNeil Gorsuch Supreme Court candidatesU.S
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List Of Federally Recognized Tribes
There is a list of federally recognized tribes in the contiguous United States
United States
of America. There are also federally recognized Alaska Native tribes. As of 17 January 2017[update], 567 Native American tribes were legally recognized by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) of the United States.[1][2][3] Description[edit] In the United States, the Indian tribe is a fundamental unit, and the constitution grants Congress the right to interact with tribes. More specifically, the Supreme Court of the United States
United States
in United States v. Sandoval, 231 U.S. 28 (1913), warned, "it is not..
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Northern Mariana Islands
The Northern Mariana Islands, officially the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
Mariana Islands
(CNMI; Chamorro: Sankattan Siha Na Islas Mariånas; Refaluwasch
Refaluwasch
or Carolinian: Commonwealth Téél Falúw kka Efáng llól Marianas), is an insular area and commonwealth of the United States
United States
consisting of 15 islands in the northwestern Pacific Ocean
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Navassa Island
Navassa Island
Island
(/nəˈvæsə/; French: l'île de la Navasse; also La Navasse, La Navase) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. The island is subject to an ongoing territorial dispute between Haiti
Haiti
and the United States, which administers it through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.[1] The U.S. has claimed the island since 1857, based on the Guano Islands Act
Guano Islands Act
of 1856. Haiti's claim over Navassa goes back to the Treaty of Ryswick
Treaty of Ryswick
in 1697 that established French possessions in Hispaniola, that were transferred from Spain by the treaty.[2] As well as the western half of the main island and certain other specifically named nearby islands, Haiti's 1801 constitution also claimed "other adjacent (but unnamed) islands". Navassa was not one of the named islands. Since its 1874 Constitution, and after the establishment of the 1857 U.S
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Midway Islands
Midway Atoll
Atoll
(/ˈmɪdweɪ/; also called Midway Island and Midway Islands; Hawaiian: Pihemanu Kauihelani) is a 2.4-square-mile (6.2 km2) atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 28°12′N 177°21′W / 28.200°N 177.350°W / 28.200; -177.350Coordinates: 28°12′N 177°21′W / 28.200°N 177.350°W / 28.200; -177.350. Midway is roughly equidistant between North America and Asia. Midway Atoll
Atoll
is an unorganized, unincorporated territory of the United States. Midway continues to be the only island in the Hawaiian archipelago that is not part of the state of Hawaii. Unlike the other Hawaiian islands, Midway observes Samoa Time (UTC−11:00, i.e., eleven hours behind Coordinated Universal Time), which is one hour behind the time in the state of Hawaii. For statistical purposes, Midway is grouped as one of the United States Minor Outlying Islands
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Kingman Reef
Kingman Reef
Kingman Reef
/ˈkɪŋmən/ is a largely submerged, uninhabited triangular shaped reef, 9.5 nautical miles (18 kilometers) east-west and 5 nmi (9 km) north-south,[1] located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly halfway between the Hawaiian Islands
Hawaiian Islands
and American Samoa
American Samoa
at 6°23′N 162°25′W / 6.383°N 162.417°W / 6.383; -162.417.[2][3] It is the northernmost of the Northern Line Islands and lies 36 nautical miles (67 km) northwest of the next closest island (Palmyra Atoll), and 930 nautical miles (1,720 km) south of Honolulu.[2] The reef encloses a lagoon up to 270 feet (82 m) deep in its western part.[1][self-published source] The total area within the outer rim of the reef is 29 sq mi (75 km2)
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Johnston Atoll
Johnston Atoll, also known as Kalama Atoll
Atoll
to Native Hawaiians, is an unincorporated territory of the United States
United States
currently administered by the United States
United States
Fish
Fish
and Wildlife Service. Public entry is only by special-use permit from the U.S. Fish
Fish
and Wildlife Service. For nearly 70 years, the atoll was under the control of the U.S. military. In that time it was used as a bird sanctuary, as a naval refueling depot, as an airbase, for nuclear and biological weapons testing, for space recovery, as a secret missile base, and as a chemical weapon and Agent Orange
Agent Orange
storage and disposal site
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American People
Americans
Americans
are citizens of the United States
United States
of America.[47] The country is home to people of many different national origins
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List Of Alaska Native Tribal Entities
This is a list of Alaska
Alaska
Native tribal entities which are recognized by the United States
United States
Bureau of Indian Affairs. For related lists, see the List of Indian reservations in the United States, List of Native American Tribal Entities (federally recognized lower 48 groups) and List of State Recognized American Indian Tribal Entities. This list pertains only to the state of Alaska, and is maintained by the U.S. Federal Government. For more detail on how Alaska
Alaska
Native villages came to be tracked in this way, see Alaska
Alaska
Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971
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Samoan Language
Samoan (Gagana faʻa Sāmoa or Gagana Sāmoa – IPA: [ŋaˈŋana ˈsaːmʊa]) is the language of the Samoan Islands, comprising the Independent State of Samoa
Samoa
and the United States territory
United States territory
of American Samoa. It is an official language – alongside English – in both jurisdictions. Samoan, a Polynesian language, is the first language for most of the Samoa
Samoa
Islands' population of about 246,000 people. With many Samoan people living in other countries, the total number of speakers worldwide is estimated at 510,000 in 2015
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Chamorro Language
Chamorro (/tʃəˈmɔːroʊ/)[3] (Chamorro: Finu' Chamoru) is an Austronesian language spoken by about 58,000 people (about 25,800 people on Guam
Guam
and about 32,200 in the Northern Mariana Islands
Mariana Islands
and the rest of the United States).[4] It is the native and spoken language of the Chamorro people
Chamorro people
who are the indigenous people of Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands, US territories.Contents1 Speakers 2 Revitalization efforts 3 Classification 4 Phonology4.1 Vowels 4.2 Consonants5 Orthography 6 Grammar 7 Basic phrases 8 Numbers 9 Months 10 Chamorro studies 11 See also 12 References12.1 Notes 12.2 General references13 External linksSpeakers[edit]"Hafa Adai" sign at Antonio B. Won Pat International Airport
Antonio B

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List Of Boroughs And Census Areas In Alaska
The U.S. state
U.S. state
of Alaska
Alaska
is divided into 19 organized boroughs and one "Unorganized Borough". Alaska
Alaska
and Louisiana
Louisiana
are the only states that do not call their first-order administrative subdivisions counties ( Louisiana
Louisiana
uses parishes instead).[1] Many of the most densely populated regions of the state are part of Alaska's boroughs, which function similarly to counties in other states. However, unlike county equivalents in the other 49 states, the organized boroughs do not cover the entire land area of the state. The area not part of any organized borough is referred to as the Unorganized Borough. The U.S. Census Bureau, in cooperation with the state, divides the Unorganized Borough into 10 census areas, each roughly corresponding to an election district, thus totaling 29 county equivalents
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Unorganized Borough, Alaska
The Unorganized Borough is made up of the portions of the U.S. state of Alaska which are not contained in any of its 19 organized boroughs. It encompasses nearly half of Alaska's land area, 323,440 square miles (837,700 km2), an area larger than any other U.S. state, and larger than the land area of the smallest 16 states combined. As of the 2000 U.S. Census, it had a population of 81,803, which was 13% of the population of the state.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Dispute over future mandatory boroughs 4 Major communities 5 References 6 External linksOverview[edit] Unique among the United States, Alaska is not entirely subdivided into organized county equivalents. To facilitate census taking in the vast unorganized area, the United States Census Bureau, in cooperation with the state, divided the unorganized borough into 11 census areas, beginning with the 1970 census
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