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Tenthredinidae
Allantinae Blennocampinae Heterarthrinae Nematinae Selandriinae - (includes Dolerinae) Susaninae Tenthredininae Tenthredinidae
Tenthredinidae
is the largest family of sawflies, with well over 7,500 species worldwide,[2] divided into 430 genera. Larvae
Larvae
are typically herbivores and feed on the foliage of trees and shrubs, with occasional exceptions that are leaf miners, stem borers, or gall makers. The larvae of externally feeding species resemble small caterpillars. As with all hymenopterans, common sawflies undergo complete metamorphosis. The family has no easily seen diagnostic features, though the combination of five to nine antennal flagellomeres plus a clear separation of the first abdominal tergum from the metapleuron can reliably separate them. These sawflies are often black or brown, and from 3–20 mm long
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Gall
Galls or cecidia are a kind of swelling growth on the external tissues of plants or animals. Plant
Plant
galls are abnormal outgrowths[1] of plant tissues, similar to benign tumors or warts in animals. They can be caused by various parasites, from fungi and bacteria, to insects and mites. Plant
Plant
galls are often highly organized structures and because of this the cause of the gall can often be determined without the actual agent being identified. This applies particularly to some insect and mite plant galls
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Croesus
Croesus[1] (/ˈkriːsəs/ KREE-səs; Ancient Greek: Κροῖσος, Kroisos; 595 BC – c. 546 BC) was the king of Lydia
Lydia
who, according to Herodotus, reigned for 14 years: from 560 BC until his defeat by the Persian king Cyrus the Great
Cyrus the Great
in 546 BC[2] (sometimes given as 547 BC). Croesus
Croesus
was renowned for his wealth; Herodotus
Herodotus
and Pausanias noted that his gifts were preserved at Delphi.[3] The fall of Croesus
Croesus
made a profound impact on the Greeks, providing a fixed point in their calendar. "By the fifth century at least," J.A.S
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Claudius
Claudius
Claudius
(/ˈklɔːdiəs/; Latin: Tiberius
Tiberius
Claudius
Claudius
Caesar Augustus Germanicus;[1][2] 1 August 10 BC – 13 October 54 AD) was Roman emperor from 41 to 54. A member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, he was the son of Drusus and Antonia Minor. He was born at Lugdunum
Lugdunum
in Gaul, the first (and until Trajan, the only) Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
to be born outside Italy. Because he was afflicted with a limp and slight deafness due to sickness at a young age, his family ostracized him and excluded him from public office until his consulship, shared with his nephew Caligula
Caligula
in 37. Claudius' infirmity probably saved him from the fate of many other nobles during the purges of Tiberius's and Caligula's reigns; potential enemies did not see him as a serious threat
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Metallus
This is a list of characters on the Cartoon Network animated television series, Space Ghost Coast to Coast, which later moved to Adult Swim from 2001 to 2004, and then to Gametap from 2006 to 2008.Contents1 Main characters1.1 Space Ghost 1.2 Zorak 1.3 Moltar2 Recurring characters2.1 Brak 2.2 Tansit 2.3 Lokar 2.4 Chad Ghostal 2.5 Harvey Birdman3 Minor 4 See also 5 External linksMain characters[edit] Space Ghost[edit] Main article: Space Ghost Voiced by George Lowe, Space Ghost, whose real name is Tad Eustace Ghostal, was a superhero in the 60s. Though occasionally conflicted about whether saving the world or hosting a talk show best suits him, Tad genuinely wants to put on the best talk show he can. Unfortunately, his failings tend to get the better of him. He is childish, egotistical, and petty, and he remains generally oblivious to his surroundings. He has little regard for the well-being of others and often demeans his sidekicks and guests
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Ardis
Ardis is a female first name of Irish and Scottish origin.[1] Its meaning is fervent.[2][3] Notable people with the name include:Ardis Egan, the founder of Egan Junior High School in Los Altos, California Ardis Fagerholm (born 1971), a Swedish pop singer Ardis Herrold, American astronomy educator at Grosse Pointe North High School Ardis Joan Krainik (1928 – 1997), an American mezzo-soprano opera singerSee also[edit]Ardis Publishing, Russian-English publishing company Ardis Furnace, abandoned experimental blast furnace in Michigan Advanced Radio Data Information Services (ARDIS), a wireless data network Jim Ardis, mayor of Peoria, IllinoisReferences[edit]^ Ardis - Meaning of name Retrieved November 20, 2008 ^ Meaning of Ardis at babynamesbase.com Retrieved November 20, 2008 ^ Ardis - Name meanings Archived July 6, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved November 20, 2008This page or section lists people that share the same given name
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Athalia
Athaliah
Athaliah
(/ˌæθəˈlaɪ.ə/; Hebrew: עֲתַלְיָה, ʻĂṯalyâ, "God is exalted"; Greek: Γοθολία; Latin: Athalia) was queen consort of Judah as the wife of King Jehoram, a descendant of King David, and later queen regnant c
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British Columbia
British Columbia
British Columbia
(BC; French: Colombie-Britannique) is the westernmost province of Canada, located between the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
and the Rocky Mountains. With an estimated population of 4.8 million as of 2017, it is Canada's third-most populous province. The first British settlement in the area was Fort Victoria, established in 1843, which gave rise to the City of Victoria, at first the capital of the separate Colony of Vancouver
Vancouver
Island. Subsequently, on the mainland, the Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866)
Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866)
was founded by Richard Clement Moody[5] and the Royal Engineers, Columbia Detachment, in response to the Fraser Canyon
Fraser Canyon
Gold Rush
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Animal
Animals are multicellular eukaryotic organisms that form the biological kingdom Animalia. With few exceptions, animals consume organic material, breathe oxygen, are able to move, reproduce sexually, and grow from a hollow sphere of cells, the blastula, during embryonic development. Over 1.5 million living animal species have been described—of which around 1 million are insects—but it has been estimated there are over 7 million in total. Animals range in size from 8.5 millionths of a metre to 33.6 metres (110 ft) long and have complex interactions with each other and their environments, forming intricate food webs. The study of animals is called zoology. Aristotle divided animals into those with blood and those without. Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
created the first hierarchical biological classification for animals in 1758 with his Systema Naturae, which Jean-Baptiste Lamarck expanded into 14 phyla by 1809
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Fossil
A fossil (from Classical Latin
Latin
fossilis; literally, "obtained by digging")[1] is any preserved remains, impression, or trace of any once-living thing from a past geological age. Examples include bones, shells, exoskeletons, stone imprints of animals or microbes, hair, petrified wood, oil, coal, and DNA
DNA
remnants. The totality of fossils is known as the fossil record. Paleontology
Paleontology
is the study of fossils: their age, method of formation, and evolutionary significance. Specimens are usually considered to be fossils if they are over 10,000 years old.[2] The oldest fossils are from around 3.48 billion years old[3][4][5] to 4.1 billion years old.[6][7] The observation in the 19th century that certain fossils were associated with certain rock strata led to the recognition of a geological timescale and the relative ages of different fossils
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Petiole (insect)
In entomology, petiole is the technical term for the narrow waist of some hymenopteran insects, especially ants, bees, and wasps in the order Apocrita. The petiole can consist of either one or two segments, a characteristic that separates major subfamilies of ants. Structure[edit] The term 'petiole' is most commonly used to refer to the constricted first (and sometimes second) metasomal (posterior) segment of members of the hymenopteran suborder Apocrita
Apocrita
(ants, bees, and wasps). It is sometimes also used to refer to other insects with similar body shapes, where the metasomal base is constricted
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Metapleuron
The metathorax is the posterior of the three segments in the thorax of an insect, and bears the third pair of legs. Its principal sclerites (exoskeletal plates) are the metanotum (dorsal), the metasternum (ventral), and the metapleuron (lateral) on each side. The metathorax is the segment that bears the hindwings in most winged insects, though sometimes these may be reduced or modified, as in Diptera, in which they are reduced to form halteres, or flightless beetles (Coleoptera), in which they may be completely absent even though forewings are still present. All adult insects possess legs on the metathorax
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Tergum
A tergum (Latin for "the back"; plural terga, associated adjective tergal) is the dorsal ('upper') portion of an arthropod segment other than the head. The anterior edge is called the base and posterior edge is called the apex or margin. A given tergum may be divided into hardened plates or sclerites commonly referred to as tergites.[1]:20 For a detailed explanation of the terminology, see [2] Kinorhynchs have tergal and sternal plates too, though seemingly not homologous with those of arthropods.[3] So, for example, in a thoracic segment, the tergum may be divided into an anterior notum and a posterior scutellum
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Abdomen
The abdomen (less formally called the belly, stomach, tummy or midriff) constitutes the part of the body between the thorax (chest) and pelvis, in humans and in other vertebrates. The region occupied by the abdomen is termed the abdominal cavity. In arthropods it is the posterior tagma of the body; it follows the thorax or cephalothorax.[1][2] The abdomen stretches from the thorax at the thoracic diaphragm to the pelvis at the pelvic brim. The pelvic brim stretches from the lumbosacral joint (the intervertebral disc between L5 and S1) to the pubic symphysis and is the edge of the pelvic inlet. The space above this inlet and under the thoracic diaphragm is termed the abdominal cavity
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Flagellomere
Antennae (singular: antenna), sometimes referred to as "feelers," are paired appendages used for sensing in arthropods. Antennae are connected to the first one or two segments of the arthropod head. They vary widely in form, but are always made of one or more jointed segments. While they are typically sensory organs, the exact nature of what they sense and how they sense it is not the same in all groups. Functions may variously include sensing touch, air motion, heat, vibration (sound), and especially smell or taste.[1][2] Antennae are sometimes modified for other purposes, such as mating, brooding, swimming, and even anchoring the arthropod to a substrate.[2] Larval arthropods have antennae that differ from those of the adult. Many crustaceans, for example, have free-swimming larvae that use their antennae for swimming
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