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Temple Of The Tooth
Sri Dalada Maligawa or the Temple of the Sacred Tooth Relic is a Buddhist temple
Buddhist temple
in the city of Kandy, Sri Lanka. It is located in the royal palace complex of the former Kingdom of Kandy, which houses the relic of the tooth of the Buddha. Since ancient times, the relic has played an important role in local politics because it is believed that whoever holds the relic holds the governance of the country. Kandy
Kandy
was the last capital of the Sri Lankan kings and is a World Heritage Site mainly due to the temple. Bhikkhus of the two chapters of Malwatte and Asgiriya conduct daily worship in the inner chamber of the temple. Rituals are performed three times daily: at dawn, at noon and in the evenings. On Wednesdays there is a symbolic bathing of the relic with an herbal preparation made from scented water and fragrant flowers called Nanumura Mangallaya
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World Heritage Site
A World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
is a landmark or area which is selected by the United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as having cultural, historical, scientific or other form of significance, and is legally protected by international treaties. The sites are judged important to the collective interests of humanity. To be selected, a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
must be an already classified landmark, unique in some respect as a geographically and historically identifiable place having special cultural or physical significance (such as an ancient ruin or historical structure, building, city, complex, desert, forest, island, lake, monument, mountain, or wilderness area)
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Kelaniya Raja Maha Vihara
The Kelaniya
Kelaniya
Raja Maha Vihara or Kelaniya
Kelaniya
Temple is a Buddhist
Buddhist
temple in Kelaniya, Sri Lanka, seven miles from Colombo. The Chief Incumbent (Chief Priest) is Venerable
Venerable
Professor
Professor
Kollupitiye Mahinda Sangharakkhitha Thera. Buddhists believe the temple to have been hallowed during the third and final visit of the Lord Buddha to Sri Lanka, eight years after gaining enlightenment. Its history would thus go back to before 500 BCE. The Mahawansa
Mahawansa
records that the original Stupa
Stupa
at Kelaniya
Kelaniya
enshrined a gem-studded throne on which the Buddha sat and preached. The temple flourished during the Kotte
Kotte
era but much of its land was confiscated during the Portuguese empire
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Sri Jayawardenepura Kotte
Sri Jayawardenepura Kotte
Sri Jayawardenepura Kotte
(commonly known as Kotte /ˈkoʊteɪ/) is the official capital of Sri Lanka.[1] Sri Jayawardenepura Kotte
Sri Jayawardenepura Kotte
is a satellite city and within the urban area of Sri Lanka's capital, Colombo.Contents1 History 2 Legislature 3 Municipal structure3.1 Zones4 Demographics 5 Infrastructure5.1 Transport 5.2 Health 5.3 Education6 Climate 7 Sports and recreation 8 Notable residents 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit]Map of Kotte (1557-1565)The village of Darugama lay at the confluence of two streams, the Diyawanna Oya
Diyawanna Oya
and the Kolonnawa
Kolonnawa
Oya. As Darugama was a naturally secure place, it was not easy for enemies to enter it
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Hamsa-Sandesha
Hansa-Sandesha (Sanskrit: हंससन्देश; IAST: Hansasandeśa) or "The message of the Swan" is a Sanskrit love poem written by Vedanta Desika in the 13th century AD. A short lyric poem of 110 verses, it describes how Rama, hero of the Ramayana epic, sends a message via a swan to his beloved wife, Sita, who has been abducted by the demon king Ravana
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Kingdom Of Gampola
Gampola
Gampola
is a town located near Kandy
Kandy
in the Central Province of Sri Lanka. It was made the capital city of the island by King Buwanekabahu IV, who ruled for four years in the mid fourteenth century. King Buwanekabahu IV (son of King Vijayabahu V) ascended to the throne after his father and shifted the capital from Kurunegala to Gampola, with the support of the General Senalankadhikara. After his death, his brother, King Parakramabahu V (1353 AD - 1359 AD), who used to reign from Dedigama ascended the throne and moved to Gampola. He was dethroned by King Buwanekabahu IV's son, King Vikramabahu III (1359 AD - 1374 AD) and sent to Malaya. King Vikramabahu III conveyed the tooth relic to Gampola
Gampola
and held a festival in honor of this sacred relic. He built a shrine at Niyamgampaya in Gampola. The rock temple "Gadaladeniya Viharaya" was constructed by king Vikramabahu III
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Rajasinha II Of Kandy
Rajasimha II, also known as Rajasingha II (pre coronation, Prince Mahastana), was a Sinhalese King, reigned 1629 – 6 December 1687; third king of the kingdom of Kandy
Kandy
in Sri Lanka. Rajasingha requested Dutch aid to help expel the Portuguese from the island, which they successfully did in 1656. By this time however it had become clear to the Kandyans that the Dutch not only intended to expel the Portuguese but to replace them as the major colonial power on the island, and from 1645 onwards Rajasingha was engaged in sporadic warfare with his erstwhile allies.Contents1 Birth and early life 2 Early reign: arrival of the Dutch 3 Late reign: stalemate 4 Significance 5 See also 6 Sources 7 External linksBirth and early life[edit] Rajasingha was the son of Senarat (Senarath), the second ruler of the kingdom of Kandy, based at the city of Senkadagala (modern Kandy) in Sri Lanka's mountainous interior
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Vira Narendra Sinha Of Kandy
Vira Parakrama Narendra Sinha (1707–1739 AD) was the last Sinhalese King of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
of the Kingdom of Kandy. Narendrasinha ascended to the throne when he was 17 years old and reigned for 32 years. Vira Parakrama Narendra Sinha was believed to be a considerably pious monarch, and like his predecessor, he lived at peace with the Dutch invaders and devoted himself to the furtherance of literature and religion. His wife was a Madurai
Madurai
Nayak Dynasty
Dynasty
princess from southern India. Since he had no children of his own he was succeeded by his wife's brother, Sri Vijaya Rajasinha, who was of Nayakkar nationality which originated from south India
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Moat
A moat is a deep, broad ditch, either dry or filled with water, that is dug and surrounds a castle, fortification, building or town, historically to provide it with a preliminary line of defence. In some places moats evolved into more extensive water defences, including natural or artificial lakes, dams and sluices. In older fortifications, such as hillforts, they are usually referred to simply as ditches, although the function is similar. In later periods, moats or water defences may be largely ornamental
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Sri Vikrama Rajasinha Of Kandy
Sri Vikrama Rajasinha (1780 – January 30, 1832, born Kannasamy Nayaka) was the last of four Kings, to rule the last Sinhalese monarchy of the Kingdom of Kandy
Kingdom of Kandy
in Sri Lanka. The Nayak Kings were Telugu nominal Buddhists[1] who practiced Hinduism[2]. It is claimed that they spoke Tamil.[3][4][5][6] The King was eventually deposed by the British under the terms of the Kandyan Convention, in 1815, ending over 2300 years of Sinhalese monarchy on the island. The island was incorporated into the British Empire, and Sri Vikrama Rajasinha was succeeded by George III, as monarch of British Ceylon.Contents1 Early life 2 Reign2.1 Early reign 2.2 Internal Conflict3 Death 4 Legacy 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Prior to his coronation in 1798, Sri Vikrama Rajasinha was known as Prince Kannasamy.[7] He was a member of the Madurai
Madurai
royal family and the nephew of Sri Rajadhi Rajasinha
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Isurumuniya
Isurumuniya
Isurumuniya
is a Buddhist
Buddhist
temple situated near to the Tissa Wewa (Tisa tank) in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. There are four carvings of special interest in this Vihara. They are the Isurumuniya
Isurumuniya
Lovers, Elephant Pond and The Royal Family.Contents1 History 2 Archaeological ruins2.1 Isurumuni Lovers 2.2 Royal Family Carving 2.3 Elephant Pond Carving3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The temple was built by King Devanampiya Tissa
Devanampiya Tissa
(307 BC to 267 BC) who ruled in the ancient Sri Lankan capital of Anuradhapura. After 500 children of high-caste were ordained, Isurumuniya
Isurumuniya
was built for them to reside. King Kasyapa I (473-491 AD) renovated this viharaya and named it as "Boupulvan, Kasubgiri Radmaha Vehera". This name is derived from names of his 2 daughters and his name
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Sirimeghavanna Of Anuradhapura
Sirimeghavanna, also known as Kirthi Sri Meghavarna and Kithsirimevan was King of Anuradhapura in the 4th century, whose reign lasted from 304 to 332. He succeeded his father Mahasena as King of Anuradhapura and was succeeded by his brother Jettha Tissa II.[1]Contents1 Importance 2 In popular culture 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksImportance[edit] The sacred relic of the tooth of the Buddha was brought to Sri Lanka during the reign of this king[2] who welcomed it with great respect, ushered them to his capital and enshrined it in Meghagiri Viharaya, presently known as Isurumuniya in Anuradhapura. In order to honor the sacred tooth relic, an annual procession called dalada perahera begins from the era of this king.[1] In popular culture[edit] In the 2014 Sinhala film Siri Daladagamanaya, the role of Sirimeghavanna is played by Udara Rathnayake.[3] See also[edit]List of Sinhalese monarchs History of Sri LankaReferences[edit]^ a b Cunha, Goseph Gerson (2001)
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Kalinga (historical Kingdom)
Kalinga is a historical region of India. It is generally defined as the eastern coastal region between the Mahanadi
Mahanadi
and the Godavari rivers, although its boundaries have fluctuated with the territory of its rulers. The core territory of Kalinga now encompasses a large part of Odisha
Odisha
and northern part of Andhra Pradesh. At its widest extent, the Kalinga region also included a part of present-day Chhattisgarh and Telangana. The Kalingas have been mentioned as a major tribe in the legendary text Mahabharata. In the 3rd century BCE, the region came under Mauryan control as a result of the Kalinga War. It was subsequently ruled by several regional dynasties whose rulers bore the title Kalingadhipati ("Lord of Kalinga"); these dynasties included Mahameghavahana, Vasishtha, Mathara, Pitrbhakta, Shailodbhava, Somavamsi, and Eastern Ganga
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Solias Mendis
Walimuni Solias Mendis
Solias Mendis
(June 17, 1897 – September 1, 1975) was a renowned Sri Lankan (Sinhala) artist primarily known for his Buddhist temple paintings, accomplished in a neo-classical style.[1][2] A native of Mahawewa, Madampe in Sri Lanka, second of seven boys in the family, Mendis was intended by his parents to become an Ayurveda Physician, but he was drawn to art.[1] In his early years, he worked and trained alongside his uncle Memonis Silva, himself a master painter.[1][3] Once accomplished himself, he began painting murals in Buddhist temples.[1] Later such as Rannasgalla Vihara and Maddepola Vihara.The Buddhist monks and devotees who saw magnificent style decided to call him to paint in Kelani Vihara
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Dharmapala Of Kotte
Dharmapala or Dom João Dharmapala Peria Bandara (1541 – May 27, 1597) was last king of the Kingdom of Kotte, in present-day Sri Lanka, from 1551 until May 27, 1597. He is also known as Dom João Dharmapala, the first Christian
Christian
king in Sri Lankan history.[1][2]Contents1 Birth 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBirth[edit] Dom João Dharmapala was born as the eldest child of Weediye Bandara, a Prince from Madampe and his wife Samudra
Samudra
Devi, daughter of King Bhuvanekabãhu VII the King of Kotte. His exact date of birth is unknown, but the year is commonly regarded as 1541. See also[edit]List of Sri Lankan monarchsReferences[edit]^ Fernando, Mario (2007). "Spiritual Leadership in the Entrepreneurial Business: A Multifaith Study". Edward Elgar Publishing. Retrieved 26 February 2015.  ^ "Portuguese encounter with King of Kotte
Kotte
in 1517". Denis N. Fernando
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Sandakada Pahana
Sandakada pahana, also known as Moon-stone, is a unique feature of the Sinhalese architecture of ancient Sri Lanka.[1][2][3] It is an elaborately carved semi-circular stone slab, usually placed at the bottom of staircases and entrances. First seen in the latter stage of the Anuradhapura period, the sandakada pahana evolved through the Polonnaruwa, Gampola and Kandy period. According to historians, the sandakada pahana symbolises the cycle of Saṃsāra in Buddhism.Contents1 Etymology 2 Anuradhapura period 3 Polonnaruwa period 4 Kandy and Gampola periods 5 Symbolism 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksEtymology[edit] Known in Sinhalese as sandakada pahana, it is roughly translated into English as moonstone
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