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Turkish Language
Turkish (About this sound Türkçe ), also referred to as Istanbul Turkish, is the most widely spoken of the Turkic languages, with around 10–15 million native speakers in Southeast Europe (mostly in East and Western Thrace) and 60–65 million native speakers in Western Asia (mostly in Anatolia). Outside Turkey, significant smaller groups of speakers exist in Germany, Bulgaria, Macedonia, Northern Cyprus, Greece, the Caucasus, and other parts of Europe and Central Asia. Cyprus has requested that the European Union add Turkish as an official EU language, even though Turkey is not a member state. To the west, the influence of Ottoman Turkish—the variety of the Turkish language that was used as the administrative and literary language of the Ottoman Empire—spread as the Ottoman Empire expanded
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Köy
A village (Turkish: köy) is the smallest settlement unit in Turkey.

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Vilayet
The Vilayets (Turkish pronunciation: [vilaːˈjet]) of the Ottoman Empire were the first-order administrative division, or provinces, of the later empire, introduced with the promulgation of the Vilayet Law (Turkish: Teşkil-i Vilayet Nizamnamesi) of 21 January 1867. The reform was part of the ongoing administrative reforms that were being enacted throughout the empire, and enshrined in the Imperial Edict of 1856. The reform was at first implemented experimentally in the Danube Vilayet, specially formed in 1864 and headed by the leading reformist Midhat Pasha
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Nahiya
A nāḥiyah (Arabic: ناحية[ˈnæːħijæ], plural nawāḥī نواحي [næˈwæːħiː]), or nahia, is a regional or local type of administrative division that usually consists of a number of villages and/or sometimes smaller towns. In Tajikistan, it is a second-level division while in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan, Xinjiang, and the former Ottoman Empire, where it was also called a bucak, it is a third-level or lower division
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Khedivate Of Egypt
The Khedivate of Egypt (Arabic: الخديوية المصرية‎, Egyptian Arabic pronunciation: [xedeˈwejjet ˈmɑsˤɾ]; Ottoman Turkish: خدیویت مصرHıdiviyet-i Mısır) was an autonomous tributary state of the Ottoman Empire, established and ruled by the Muhammad Ali Dynasty following the defeat and expulsion of Napoleon Bonaparte's forces which brought an end to the short-lived French occupation of Lower Egypt. The United Kingdom invaded and took control in 1882
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Special
Special or the specials or variation, may refer to:

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Provinces Of Turkey
Turkey is divided into 81 provinces (Turkish: il). Each province is divided into a number of different districts (ilçe). The provincial government is seated in the central district (merkez ilçe). The central area usually bears the name of the province (e.g. the city of Van is the central district of Van Province)
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Belediye
Baladiyah (Arabic: بلدية‎) is a type of Arabic administrative division that can be translated as "district", "sub-district" or "municipality". The plural is baladiyat (Arabic: بلديات‎)
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Pashalik
Eyalets (Ottoman Turkish: ایالت‎, pronounced [ejaːˈlet], English: State), also known as beylerbeyliks or pashaliks, were a primary administrative division of the Ottoman Empire. From 1453 to the beginning of the nineteenth century the Ottoman local government was loosely structured. The Empire was at first divided into provinces called e
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Mutasarrıf
In the Ottoman Empire, a mutasarrıf was an administrative authority of any of certain sanjaks, who were appointed directly by the Sultan.

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City
A city is a large human settlement. Cities generally have extensive systems for housing, transportation, sanitation, utilities, land use, and communication. Their density facilitates interaction between people, government organizations and businesses, sometimes benefiting different parties in the process. Historically, city-dwellers have been a small proportion of humanity overall, but following two centuries of unprecedented and rapid urbanization, roughly half of the world population now lives in cities, which has had profound consequences for global sustainability. Present-day cities usually form the core of larger metropolitan areas and urban areas—creating numerous commuters traveling towards city centers for employment, entertainment, and edification
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