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Temperance (virtue)
Temperance is defined as moderation or voluntary self-restraint.[1] It is typically described in terms of what an individual voluntarily refrains from doing.[2] This includes restraint from retaliation in the form of non-violence and forgiveness, restraint from arrogance in the form of humility and modesty, restraint from excesses such as splurging now in the form of prudence, and restraint from excessive anger or craving for something in the form of calmness and self-control.[2] Temperance has been described as a virtue by religious thinkers, philosophers, and more recently, psychologists, particularly in the positive psychology movement. In classical iconography, the virtue is often depicted as a woman holding two vessels transferring water from one to another
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Luca Giordano
Luca Giordano
Luca Giordano
(18 October 1634 – 12 January 1705) was an Italian late Baroque
Baroque
painter and printmaker in etching. Fluent and decorative, he worked successfully in Naples
Naples
and Rome, Florence
Florence
and Venice, before spending a decade in Spain.Contents1 Early life and training 2 Florence 3 Court painter in Spain (1692–1702) 4 Late work in Naples 5 Influence 6 Critical reputation 7 Gallery 8 References 9 Sources 10 External linksEarly life and training[edit]Luca GiordanoVenus and MarsDemokrit, 1690, Hamburger KunsthalleResurrectionThe Rape of LucretiaBorn in Naples, Giordano was the son of the painter Antonio Giordano.[1] In around 1650 he was apprenticed to Ribera[2] on the recommendation of the viceroy of Naples[3] and his early work was heavily influenced by his teacher
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Epistle To The Galatians
The Epistle
Epistle
to the Galatians, often shortened to Galatians, is the ninth book of the New Testament. It is a letter from Paul the Apostle to a number of Early Christian
Early Christian
communities in Galatia. Scholars have suggested that this is either the Roman province of Galatia
Galatia
in southern Anatolia, or a large region defined by an ethnic group of Celtic people in central Anatolia.[1] Paul is principally concerned with the controversy surrounding Gentile Christians and the Mosaic Law
Mosaic Law
during the Apostolic Age. Paul argues that the Gentile Galatians do not need to adhere to the tenets of the Mosaic Law, particularly circumcision, by contextualizing the role of the law in light of the revelation of Christ
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Commana
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Commana (Breton: Kommanna) is a commune in the Finistère department of Brittany in northwestern France.Contents1 Population 2 Breton language 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPopulation[edit] Inhabitants of Commana are called in French Commanéens.Historical populationYear Pop. ±%1793 2,664 —    1800 2,045 −23.2%1806 2,332 +14.0%1821 2,457 +5.4%1831 2,670 +8.7%1836 2,691 +0.8%1841 2,881 +7.1%1846 2,976 +3.3%1851 2,781 −6.6%1856 2,712 −2.5%1861 2,763 +1.9%1866 2,660 −3.7%1872 2,645 −0.6%1876 2,634 −0.4%1881 2,546 −3.3%1886 2,622
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Eightfold Path
The Noble Eightfold Path (Pali: ariyo aṭṭhaṅgiko maggo, Sanskrit: āryāṣṭāṅgamārga)[1] is an early summary of the path of Buddhist practices leading to liberation from samsara, the painful cycle of rebirth.[2][3] The Eightfold Path consists of eight practices: right view, right resolve, right speech, right conduct, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right samadhi ('meditative absorption or union').[4] In early Buddhism, these practices started with insight (right view), culminating in dhyana or samadhi as the core soteriological practice.[5] In later Buddhism, insight (Prajñā) became the central soteriological instrument, leading to a different concept and structure of the path.[5][6] The Eightfold Path teaches that by restraining oneself, cultivating discipline, and practicing mindfulness and meditation, house-leavers (monks and nuns) attain nirvana and stop their craving, clinging and karmic accumulations, thereby ending their rebirth and sufferin
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Book Of Proverbs
The Book
Book
of Proverbs (Hebrew: מִשְלֵי, Míshlê (Shlomoh), "Proverbs (of Solomon)") is the second book of the third section (called Writings) of the Hebrew
Hebrew
Bib
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New Testament
The New Testament
New Testament
(Greek: Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Latin: Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible. The New Testament
New Testament
discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity. Christians
Christians
regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture. The New Testament
New Testament
(in whole or in part) has frequently accompanied the spread of Christianity
Christianity
around the world. It reflects and serves as a source for Christian theology
Christian theology
and morality
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Theology
Theology
Theology
is the critical study of the nature of the divine
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Fruits Of The Spirit
The Fruit of the Holy Spirit is a biblical term that sums up nine attributes of a person or community living in accord with the Holy Spirit according to the Epistle to the Galatians: "But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control."[2] The fruits is contrasted with the Works of the Flesh which immediately precede it in the chapter. Catholic tradition follows the Vulgate version of Galatians in listing 12 fruits: charity, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, generosity, gentleness, faithfulness, modesty, self-control, and chastity.Contents1 Early Commentary 2 Love (Greek: agape, Latin: caritas) 3 Joy (Greek: chara, Latin: gaudium) 4 Peace (Greek: eirene, Latin: pax) 5 Patience (Greek: makrothumia, Latin: longanimitas) 6 Kindness (Greek: chrestotes, Latin: benignitas) 7 Goodness (Greek: agathosune, Latin: bonitas) 8 Faithfulness (Greek: pistis, Latin: fides) 9 Gentleness (Greek: prautes, Latin:
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King James Version
The King James Version
King James Version
(KJV), also known as the King James Bible
Bible
(KJB) or simply the Authorized Version (AV), is an English translation of the Christian Bible
Bible
for the Church of England, begun in 1604 and completed in 1611.[a] The books of the King James Version
King James Version
include the 39 books of the Old Testament, an intertestamental section containing 14 books of the Apocrypha and the 27 books of the New Testament. It was first printed by the King's Printer Robert Barker and was the third translation into English approved by the English Church authorities
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Strong's Concordance
The Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible,[n 1] generally known as Strong's Concordance, is a Bible concordance, an index of every word in the King James Version
King James Version
(KJV), constructed under the direction of James Strong. Strong first published his Concordance in 1890, while professor of exegetical theology at Drew Theological Seminary.Editions and reprints of Strong's Concordance, now in public domainContents1 Purpose 2 Strong's numbers 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References5.1 Citations 5.2 Bibliography6 External linksPurpose[edit] The purpose of Strong's Concordance
Strong's Concordance
is not to provide content or commentary about the Bible, but to provide an index to the Bible. This allows the reader to find words where they appear in the Bible. This index allows a student of the Bible to re-find a phrase or passage previously studied
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Aristotle
Aristotle
Aristotle
(/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/;[3] Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs, pronounced [aristotélɛːs]; 384–322 BC)[n 1] was an ancient Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira, Chalkidiki, in the north of Classical Greece. Along with Plato, Aristotle
Aristotle
is considered the "Father of Western Philosophy", which inherited almost its entire lexicon from his teachings, including problems and methods of inquiry, so influencing almost all forms of knowledge. Little is known for certain about his life. His father, Nicomachus, died when Aristotle
Aristotle
was a child, and he was brought up by a guardian. At seventeen or eighteen years of age, he joined Plato's Academy
Plato's Academy
in Athens and remained there until the age of thirty-seven (c
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Amish
The Amish
Amish
(/ˈɑːmɪʃ/; Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
German: Amisch, German: Amische) are a group of traditionalist Christian church fellowships with Swiss Anabaptist
Anabaptist
origins. They are closely related to, but distinct from, Mennonite
Mennonite
churches. The Amish
Amish
are known for simple living, plain dress, and reluctance to adopt many conveniences of modern technology. The history of the Amish
Amish
church began with a schism in Switzerland within a group of Swiss and Alsatian Anabaptists
Anabaptists
in 1693 led by Jakob Ammann.[2] Those who followed Ammann became known as Amish.[3] In the early 18th century, many Amish
Amish
and Mennonites
Mennonites
immigrated to Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
for a variety of reasons
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Old Order Mennonites
Old Order Mennonites form a branch of the Mennonite tradition. Old Order are those Mennonite groups of Swiss German and south German heritage who practice a lifestyle without some elements of modern technology, who dress plain and who have retained the old forms of worship, baptism and communion. All Old Order Mennonite reject certain technologies (e.g. television), but the extent of this rejection depends on the group. Old Order groups generally place great emphasis on a disciplined community instead of the individual's faith beliefs.[1] The Pennsylvania German language is spoken and vigorous among all horse-and-buggy groups, except for the Virginia Old Order Mennonites, who lost the language before becoming Old Order. There is no overall church or conference to unite all the different groups of Old Order Mennonites. A large minority of Old Order Mennonite use cars (~10,000 members), whereas a majority (~17,000 members) have retained horse and buggy transportation
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Compassion
Compassion
Compassion
motivates people to go out of their way to help the physical, mental or emotional pains of another and themselves. Compassion
Compassion
is often regarded as having sensitivity, an emotional aspect to suffering, though when based on cerebral notions such as fairness, justice, and interdependence, it may be considered rational in nature and its application understood as an activity also based on sound judgment. There is also an aspect of equal dimension, such that individual's compassion is often given a property of "depth", "vigour", or "passion"
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Yoga
Yoga
Yoga
(/ˈjoʊɡə/;[1] Sanskrit, योगः, pronunciation) is a group of physical, mental, and spiritual practices or disciplines which originated in ancient India
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