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Television Station
A television station is a set of equipment managed by a business, organisation or other entity, such as an amateur television (ATV) operator, that transmits video content via radio waves directly from a transmitter on the earth's surface to a receiver on earth. Most often the term refers to a station which broadcasts structured content to an audience or it refers to the organization that operates the station. A terrestrial television transmission can occur via analog television signals or, more recently, via digital television signals. Television stations are differentiated from cable television or other video providers in that their content is broadcast via terrestrial radio waves
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North America
North America
North America
is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.[3][4] It is bordered to the north by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
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Digital Signal 1
Digital Signal 1 (DS1, sometimes DS-1) is a T-carrier signaling scheme devised by Bell Labs.[1] DS1 is the primary digital telephone standard used in the United States, Canada and Japan and is able to transmit up to 24 multiplexed voice and data calls over telephone lines. E-carrier is used in place of T-carrier outside the United States, Canada, Japan, and South Korea. DS1 is the logical bit pattern used over a physical T1 line; in practice, the terms "DS1" and "T1" are often used interchangeably.[a]Contents1 Overview 2 Bandwidth 3 DS1 frame synchronization 4 Connectivity and alarms4.1 Alarms5 Inband T1 versus T1 PRI 6 Origin of name 7 Alternative technologies 8 Semiconductor 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 Further readingOverview[edit] T1 refers to the primary digital telephone carrier system used in North America. T1 is one line type of the PCM T-carrier hierarchy
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Television News
News
News
broadcasting is the medium of broadcasting of various news events and other information via television, radio or internet in the field of broadcast journalism. The content is usually either produced locally in a radio studio or television studio newsroom, or by a broadcast network
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Cerro De Punta
Cerro de Punta or just Cerro Punta is the highest peak in Puerto Rico, rising to 1,338 meters (4,390 ft) above sea level.[note 1] The mountain is part of the Cordillera Central and is located in the municipality of Ponce.[3][4][5][6][1][7]Contents1 Location 2 Geology 3 Best view 4 Wildlife and flora 5 Nearby roads 6 Hiking and access trail 7 Gallery 8 Notes 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksLocation[edit] The mountain is part of the Cordillera Central and is located on the border between the municipalities of Jayuya and Ponce.[8][2] The access road to the point closest to the highest elevation is from the municipality of Jayuya.[9] It is part of the Toro Negro Forest Reserve, and it has been described as "an alpine runt."[10] It is located on the western end of the Toro Negro State Park. The mountain is just north of east-to-westbound Route 143
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Operator (profession)
An operator is a professional designation used in various industries, including broadcasting (in television and radio), computing, power generation and transmission, customer service, physics, and construction. Operators are day-to-day end users of systems, that may or may not be mission-critical, but are typically managed and maintained by technicians or engineers
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Antenna (radio)
In radio, an antenna is the interface between radio waves propagating through space and electric currents moving in metal conductors, used with a transmitter or receiver.[1] In transmission, a radio transmitter supplies an electric current to the antenna's terminals, and the antenna radiates the energy from the current as electromagnetic waves (radio waves). In reception, an antenna intercepts some of the power of an electromagnetic wave in order to produce an electric current at its terminals, that is applied to a receiver to be amplified. Antennas are essential components of all radio equipment, and are used in radio broadcasting, broadcast television, two-way radio, communications receivers, radar, cell phones, satellite communications and other devices. An antenna is an array of conductors (elements), electrically connected to the receiver or transmitter
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Summit (topography)
A summit is a point on a surface that is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. Mathematically, a summit is a local maximum in elevation. The topographic terms "acme", "apex", "peak", and "zenith" are synonymous.Contents1 Definition1.1 Western United States 1.2 Summit
Summit
climbing equipment2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDefinition[edit] The term "top" is generally used only for a mountain peak that is located some distance from the nearest point of higher elevation. For example, a big massive rock next to the main summit of a mountain is not considered a summit. Summits near a higher peak, with some prominence or isolation, but not reaching a certain cutoff value for the quantities, are often considered subsummits (or subpeaks) of the higher peak, and are considered as part of the same mountain. A pyramidal peak is an exaggerated form produced by ice erosion of a mountain top
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Skyscraper
A skyscraper is a continuously habitable high-rise building that has over 40 floors[1] and is taller than approximately 150 m (492 ft).[2] Historically, the term first referred to buildings with 10 to 20 floors in 1880s. The definition shifted with advancing construction technology during the 20th Century.[1] Skyscrapers may host commercial offices or residential space, or both. For buildings above a height of 300 m (984 ft), the term "supertall" can be used, while skyscrapers reaching beyond 600 m (1,969 ft) are classified as "megatall".[3] One common feature of skyscrapers is having a steel framework that supports curtain walls. These curtain walls either bear on the framework below or are suspended from the framework above, rather than resting on load-bearing walls of conventional construction
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Radio Masts And Towers
Radio
Radio
masts and towers are, typically, tall structures designed to support antennas (also known as aerials) for telecommunications and broadcasting, including television. There are two main types: guyed and self-supporting structures
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Telemetry
Telemetry
Telemetry
is an automated communications process by which measurements and other data are collected at remote or inaccessible points and transmitted to receiving equipment for monitoring.[1] The word is derived from Greek roots: tele = remote, and metron = measure. Systems that need external instructions and data to operate require the counterpart of telemetry, telecommand.[2] Although the term commonly refers to wireless data transfer mechanisms (e.g., using radio, ultrasonic, or infrared systems), it also encompasses data transferred over other media such as a telephone or computer network, optical link or other wired communications like power line carriers. Many modern telemetry systems take advantage of the low cost and ubiquity of GSM
GSM
networks by using SMS
SMS
to receive and transmit telemetry data. A telemeter is a device used to remotely measure any quantity
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Non-commercial Educational
The term non-commercial educational (NCE) applies to a radio station or TV station
TV station
that does not accept on-air advertisements (TV ads or radio ads), as defined in the United States
United States
by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). NCE stations do not pay broadcast license fees for their non-profit uses of the radio spectrum. Stations which are almost always operated as NCE include public broadcasting, community radio, and college radio, as well as many religious broadcasting stations.[1]Contents1 Reserved channels 2 Definition of "commercial" 3 Multichannel obligations 4 References 5 See also 6 External linksReserved channels[edit] On the FM broadcast band, the Federal Communications Commission
Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) has reserved the lowest 20 channels, 201~220 (88.1~91.9 MHz) for NCE stations only. This is known as the reserved band
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Distributed Generation
Distributed generation, also distributed energy, on-site generation (OSG)[1] or district/decentralized energy is electrical generation and storage performed by a variety of small, grid-connected devices referred to as distributed energy resources (DER).[2] Conventional power stations, such as coal-fired, gas and nuclear powered plants, as well as hydroelectric dams and large-scale solar power stations, are centralized and often require electric energy to be transmitted over long distances. By contrast, DER systems are decentralized, modular and more flexible technologies, that are located close to the load they serve, albeit having capacities of only 10 megawatts (MW) or less
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Subcarrier
A subcarrier is a sideband of a radio frequency carrier wave, which is modulated to send additional information. Examples include the provision of colour in a black and white television system or the provision of stereo in a monophonic radio broadcast. There is no physical difference between a carrier and a subcarrier; the "sub" implies that it has been derived from a carrier, which has been amplitude modulated by a steady signal and has a constant frequency relation to it.Contents1 FM stereo 2 Television 3 Private audio 4 Datacasting 5 Telemetry
Telemetry
and foldback 6 MCPC satellites 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksFM stereo[edit] Stereo broadcasting is made possible by using a subcarrier on FM radio stations, which takes the left channel and "subtracts" the right channel from it — essentially by hooking up the right-channel wires backward (reversing polarity) and then joining left and reversed-right
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VHF
Very high frequency
Very high frequency
(VHF) is the ITU designation[1] for the range of radio frequency electromagnetic waves (radio waves) from 30 to 300 megahertz (MHz), with corresponding wavelengths of ten to one meter. Frequencies immediately below VHF are denoted high frequency (HF), and the next higher frequencies are known as ultra high frequency (UHF). Common uses for VHF are FM radio
FM radio
broadcasting, television broadcasting, two way land mobile radio systems (emergency, business, private use and military), long range data communication up to several tens of kilometers with radio modems, amateur radio, and marine communications. Air traffic control
Air traffic control
communications and air navigation systems (e.g
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