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Telephone Number
A telephone number is a sequence of digits assigned to a fixed-line telephone subscriber station connected to a telephone line or to a wireless electronic telephony device, such as a radio telephone or a mobile telephone, or to other devices for data transmission via the public switched telephone network (PSTN) or other private networks. A telephone number serves as an address for switching telephone calls using a system of destination code routing.[1] Telephone
Telephone
numbers are entered or dialed by a calling party on the originating telephone set, which transmits the sequence of digits in the process of signaling to a telephone exchange. The exchange completes the call either to another locally connected subscriber or via the PSTN to the called party
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Video Game Controller
A game controller is a device used with games or entertainment systems to provide input to a video game, typically to control an object or character in the game. A controller is usually connected to a game console or computer by means of a wire or cord, although, since the mid-2000s, wireless controllers have become widespread. Input devices that have been classified as game controllers include keyboards, mouses, gamepads, joysticks, etc. Special
Special
purpose devices, such as steering wheels for driving games and light guns for shooting games, are also game controllers. Game controllers have been designed and improved over the years to be as user friendly as possible
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Pager
A pager (also known as a beeper) is a wireless telecommunications device that receives and displays alphanumeric messages and/or receives and announces voice messages. One-way pagers can only receive messages, while response pagers and two-way pagers can also acknowledge, reply to, and originate messages using an internal transmitter.[1] Pagers operate as part of a paging system which includes one or more fixed transmitters (or in the case of response pagers and two-way pagers, one or more base stations), as well as a number of pagers carried by mobile users. These systems can range from a restaurant system with a single low-power transmitter, to a nationwide system with thousands of high-power base stations. Pagers were developed in the 1950s and 1960s, and became widely used by the 1980s
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Radio Station
A radio station is a set of equipment necessary to carry on communication via radio waves. Generally, it is a receiver or transmitter, an antenna, and some smaller additional equipment necessary to operate them. Radio stations
Radio stations
play a vital role in communication technology as they are heavily relied on to transfer data and information across the world.[1] More broadly, the definition of a radio station includes the aforementioned equipment and a building in which it is installed. Such a station may include several "radio stations" defined above (i.e. several sets of receivers or transmitters installed in one building but functioning independently, and several antennas installed on a field next to the building). This definition of a radio station is more often referred to as a transmitter site, transmitter station, transmission facility or transmitting station
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Telephone Circuit
In telephony, the local loop (also referred to as a local tail, subscriber line, or in the aggregate as the last mile) is the physical link or circuit that connects from the demarcation point of the customer premises to the edge of the common carrier or telecommunications service provider's network. At the edge of the carrier access network in a traditional public telephone network, the local loop terminates in a circuit switch housed in an incumbent local exchange carrier or telephone exchange. Infrastructure[edit] Traditionally, the local loop was an electrical circuit in the form of a single pair of conductors from the telephone on the customer's premises to the local telephone exchange
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Emergency Telephone Number
In many countries the public switched telephone network[1] has a single emergency telephone number (sometimes known as the universal emergency telephone number or the emergency services number) that allows a caller to contact local emergency services for assistance. The emergency number differs from country to country; it is typically a three-digit number so that it can be easily remembered and dialed quickly. Some countries have a different emergency number for each of the different emergency services; these often differ only by the last digit. See List of emergency telephone numbers.Contents1 Configuration and operation 2 History of emergency telephone numbers2.1 Operator assistance 2.2 Direct-dial numbers3 Emergency numbers and mobile telephones 4 See also 5 References5.1 Citations 5.2 Sources6 External linksConfiguration and operation[edit] The emergency telephone number is a special case in the country's telephone number plan
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1-1-2
112 is the common emergency telephone number that can be dialed free of charge from most mobile telephones and, in some countries, fixed telephones in order to reach emergency services (ambulance, fire and rescue, police). 112 is a part of the GSM
GSM
standard and all GSM-compatible telephone handsets are able to dial 112 even when locked or, in some countries, with no SIM card
SIM card
present. It is also the common emergency number in India
India
and in nearly all member states of the European Union
European Union
as well as several other countries of Europe and the world. 112 is often available alongside other numbers traditionally used in the given country to access emergency services
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1-1-1
111 (usually pronounced one-one-one) is the emergency telephone number in New Zealand. It was first implemented in Masterton
Masterton
and Carterton on 29 September 1958, and was progressively rolled out nationwide with the last exchanges converting in 1988.Contents1 History1.1 Introduction 1.2 Expansion 1.3 Controversy2 Dialling 111 3 Other New Zealand
New Zealand
emergency numbers 4 International usage of 111 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Introduction[edit] Before the introduction of 111, access to emergency services was complicated. For the quarter of New Zealand’s then 414,000 telephone subscribers that were still on manual exchanges, one would simply pick up the telephone and ask the answering operator for the police, ambulance, or fire service by name
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100 Emergency
In many countries the public switched telephone network[1] has a single emergency telephone number (sometimes known as the universal emergency telephone number or the emergency services number) that allows a caller to contact local emergency services for assistance. The emergency number differs from country to country; it is typically a three-digit number so that it can be easily remembered and dialed quickly. Some countries have a different emergency number for each of the different emergency services; these often differ only by the last digit. See List of emergency telephone numbers.Contents1 Configuration and operation 2 History of emergency telephone numbers2.1 Operator assistance 2.2 Direct-dial numbers3 Emergency numbers and mobile telephones 4 See also 5 References5.1 Citations 5.2 Sources6 External linksConfiguration and operation[edit] The emergency telephone number is a special case in the country's telephone number plan
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9-1-1
9-1-1,[1][2] also written 911, is an emergency telephone number for the North American Numbering Plan
North American Numbering Plan
(NANP), one of eight N11 codes. Like other emergency numbers around the world, this number is intended for use in emergency circumstances only, and using it for any other purpose (such as making false or prank calls) is a crime in certain jurisdictions. In over 98% of locations in the United States
United States
and Canada, dialing "9-1-1" from any telephone will link the caller to an emergency dispatch office—called a public-safety answering point (PSAP) by the telecom industry—which can send emergency responders to the caller's location in an emergency
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1-1-9
119 is the emergency telephone number in parts of Asia
Asia
and in Jamaica.Contents1 119 in South Korea 2 119 in Japan 3 119 in China 4 119 in Taiwan 5 119 in Sri Lanka 6 119 in Maldives 7 See also119 in South Korea[edit] 119 is a direct-dial emergency number for fire brigade and ambulance service operated by the National Emergency Management Agency. The caller's location is automatically traced once the call is connected, and operators who can speak English, Japanese, Chinese, and Korean should be available. 1339 is a separate number reserved for non-emergency medical information calls. An emergency pager service called "U119" also exists for registered people such as the elderly or cancer patients
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Mobile Hotspot
Tethering, or phone-as-modem (PAM), is the sharing of a mobile device's internet connection with other connected computers. Connection of a mobile device with other devices can be done over wireless LAN (Wi-Fi), over Bluetooth
Bluetooth
or by physical connection using a cable, for example through USB. If tethering is done over WLAN, the feature may be branded as a personal or mobile hotspot, which allows the device to serve as a portable router. Mobile hotspots may be protected by a PIN or password.[1] The Internet-connected mobile device can act as a portable wireless access point and router for devices connected to it.Contents1 Mobile device's OS support 2 In carriers' contracts2.1 United Kingdom 2.2 United States3 See also 4 ReferencesMobile device's OS support[edit] Many mobile devices are equipped with software to offer tethered Internet access
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Digital Television
Digital television
Digital television
(DTV) is the transmission of television signals, including the sound channel, using digital encoding, in contrast to the earlier television technology, analog television, in which the video and audio are carried by analog signals. It is an innovative advance that represents the first significant evolution in television technology since color television in the 1950s.[1] Digital TV makes more economical use of scarce radio spectrum space; it can transmit multiple channels in the same bandwidth occupied by a single channel of analog television,[2] and provides many new features that analog television cannot. A switchover from analog to digital broadcasting began around 2006 in some countries, and many industrial countries have now completed the changeover, while other countries are in various stages of adaptation
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Tablet Computer
A tablet computer, commonly shortened to tablet, is a portable personal computer, typically with a mobile operating system and LCD touchscreen display processing circuitry, and a rechargeable battery in a single thin, flat package. Tablets, being computers, do what other personal computers do, but lack some I/O
I/O
capabilities that others have. Modern tablets largely resemble modern smartphones, the only differences being that tablets are relatively larger than smartphones, with screens 7 inches (18 cm) or larger, measured diagonally,[1][2][3][4] and may not support access to a cellular network. The touchscreen display is operated by gestures executed by finger or stylus instead of the mouse, trackpad, and keyboard of larger computers. Portable computers can be classified according to the presence and appearance of physical keyboards
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Cellular Network
A cellular network or mobile network is a communication network where the last link is wireless. The network is distributed over land areas called cells, each served by at least one fixed-location transceiver, but more normally three cell sites or base transceiver stations. These base stations provide the cell with the network coverage which can be used for transmission of voice, data and others. A cell typically uses a different set of frequencies from neighboring cells, to avoid interference and provide guaranteed service quality within each cell.[1] When joined together these cells provide radio coverage over a wide geographic area
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Landline
A landline telephone (also known as land line, land-line, main line, home phone, landline, fixed-line, and wireline) is a phone that uses a metal wire or optical fiber telephone line for transmission as distinguished from a mobile cellular line, which uses radio waves for transmission. In 2003, the CIA reported approximately 1.263 billion main telephone lines worldwide. China
China
had more than any other country at 350 million and the United States
United States
was second with 268 million
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