HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Telephone
A telephone, or phone, is a telecommunications device that permits two or more users to conduct a conversation when they are too far apart to be heard directly. A telephone converts sound, typically and most efficiently the human voice, into electronic signals that are transmitted via cables and other communication channels to another telephone which reproduces the sound to the receiving user. In 1876, Scottish emigrant Alexander Graham Bell
Alexander Graham Bell
was the first to be granted a United States patent for a device that produced clearly intelligible replication of the human voice. This instrument was further developed by many others. The telephone was the first device in history that enabled people to talk directly with each other across large distances
[...More...]

"Telephone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Galvanic Corrosion
Galvanic corrosion
Galvanic corrosion
(also called bimetallic corrosion) is an electrochemical process in which one metal corrodes preferentially when it is in electrical contact with another, in the presence of an electrolyte. A similar galvanic reaction is exploited in primary cells to generate a useful electrical voltage to power portable devices.Contents1 Overview 2 Examples of corrosion2.1 Statue of Liberty 2.2 Royal Navy and HMS Alarm 2.3 US Navy Littoral Combat Ship Independence 2.4 Corroding lighting fixtures 2.5 Lasagna
Lasagna
cell 2.6 Electrolytic cleaning3 Preventing galvanic corrosion 4 Galvanic series 5 Anodic index 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOverview[edit] Dissimilar metals and alloys have different electrode potentials, and when two or more come into contact in an electrolyte, one metal acts as anode and the other as cathode
[...More...]

"Galvanic Corrosion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Small Appliance
A small appliance or small domestic appliance are portable or semi-portable machines, generally used on table-tops, counter-tops, or other platforms, to accomplish a household task. Examples include microwave ovens, toasters, humidifiers, and coffeemakers. They contrast with major appliances (British "white goods"), such as the refrigerator and washing machine, which cannot be easily moved and are generally placed on the floor. Small appliances also contrast with consumer electronics (British "brown goods") which are for leisure and entertainment rather than purely practical tasks.[1]Contents1 Uses 2 Types and examples 3 Prices 4 Powering 5 Safety 6 Definitions and regulations 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksUses[edit] Some small appliances perform the same or similar function as their larger counterparts. For example, a toaster oven is a small appliance that performs a similar function as an oven
[...More...]

"Small Appliance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Electromagnetic Interference
Electromagnetic interference
Electromagnetic interference
(EMI), also called radio-frequency interference (RFI) when in the radio frequency spectrum, is a disturbance generated by an external source that affects an electrical circuit by electromagnetic induction, electrostatic coupling, or conduction.[1] The disturbance may degrade the performance of the circuit or even stop it from functioning. In the case of a data path, these effects can range from an increase in error rate to a total loss of the data.[2] Both man-made and natural sources generate changing electrical currents and voltages that can cause EMI: ignition systems, cellular network of mobile phones, lightning, solar flares, and auroras (Northern/Southern Lights)
[...More...]

"Electromagnetic Interference" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Virtual Reality
Virtual reality
Virtual reality
(VR) is a computer-generated scenario that simulates a realistic experience. The immersive environment can be similar to the real world in order to create a lifelike experience grounded in reality or sci-fi. Augmented reality
Augmented reality
systems may also be considered a form of VR that layers virtual information over a live camera feed into a headset, or through a smartphone or tablet device. Current VR technology most commonly uses virtual reality headsets or multi-projected environments, sometimes in combination with physical environments or props, to generate realistic images, sounds and other sensations that simulate a user's physical presence in a virtual or imaginary environment. A person using virtual reality equipment is able to "look around" the artificial world, move around in it, and interact with virtual features or items
[...More...]

"Virtual Reality" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Turn-by-turn Navigation
Turn-by-turn Navigation is a feature of some GPS navigation devices where directions for a selected route are continually presented to the user in the form of spoken and visual instructions.[1] The system keeps the user up-to-date about the best route to the destination, and is often updated according to changing factors such as traffic and road conditions.[2] Turn-by-turn systems typically use an electronic voice to inform the user whether to turn left or right, the street name, and how much distance to the turn
[...More...]

"Turn-by-turn Navigation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Video Game
A video game is an electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device, but as of the 2000s, it implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. Some theorists categorize video games as an art form, but this designation is controversial. The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices
[...More...]

"Video Game" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ohm
The ohm (symbol: Ω) is the SI derived unit
SI derived unit
of electrical resistance, named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Although several empirically derived standard units for expressing electrical resistance were developed in connection with early telegraphy practice, the British Association for the Advancement of Science proposed a unit derived from existing units of mass, length and time and of a convenient size for practical work as early as 1861. The definition of the ohm was revised several times
[...More...]

"Ohm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Human Voice
The human voice consists of sound made by a human being using the vocal tract, such as talking, singing, laughing, crying, screaming, etc. The human voice frequency is specifically a part of human sound production in which the vocal folds (vocal cords) are the primary sound source. (Other sound production mechanisms produced from the same general area of the body involve the production of unvoiced consonants, clicks, whistling and whispering.) Generally speaking, the mechanism for generating the human voice can be subdivided into three parts; the lungs, the vocal folds within the larynx (voice box), and the articulators. The lung, the "pump" must produce adequate airflow and air pressure to vibrate vocal folds. The vocal folds (vocal cords) then vibrate to use airflow from the lungs to create audible pulses that form the laryngeal sound source[1]. The muscles of the larynx adjust the length and tension of the vocal folds to ‘fine-tune’ pitch and tone
[...More...]

"Human Voice" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Called Party
The called party (in some contexts called the "B-Number") is a person who (or device that) answers a telephone call. The person who (or device that) initiates a telephone call is the calling party. In some situations, the called party may number more than one: such an instance is known as a conference call. Strictly, in some systems, only one called party is contacted at each event, as to initiate a conference call the calling party contacts the first called party, then this person contacts the second called party, but audio is transferred to both called parties. In a collect call (i.e. reverse charge), the called party pays the fee for the call, when it is usually the calling party that does so. The called party also pays if the number dialed is a toll-free telephone number. In some countries such as Canada, the United States and China, users of mobile phones pay for the "airtime" to receive calls. In most other countries (e.g
[...More...]

"Called Party" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Calling Party
The calling party (in some contexts called the "A-Number") is a person who (or device that) initiates a telephone call. The person who, or device that, receives a telephone call is the called party. In some countries, it is common etiquette for a call originator to identify himself first instead of the receiver, when the connection is established. Modems and fax machines use different tones when originating or answering a connection, which may be a source of problems for the user. See also[edit]Calling-party camp-onThis article related to telephony is a stub
[...More...]

"Calling Party" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mobile Browser
A mobile browser is a web browser designed for use on a mobile device such as a mobile phone or PDA. Mobile browsers are optimized so as to display Web content most effectively for small screens on portable devices. Mobile browser software must be small and efficient to accommodate the low memory capacity and low-bandwidth of wireless handheld devices. Typically they were stripped-down web browsers, but some more modern mobile browsers can handle more recent technologies like CSS 2.1, JavaScript, and Ajax. Websites designed for access from these browsers are referred to as wireless portals[1] or collectively as the Mobile Web
[...More...]

"Mobile Browser" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sound
In physics, sound is a vibration that typically propagates as an audible wave of pressure, through a transmission medium such as a gas, liquid or solid. In human physiology and psychology, sound is the reception of such waves and their perception by the brain.[1] Humans can only hear sound waves as distinct pitches when the frequency lies between about 20 Hz and 20 kHz. Sound
Sound
above 20 kHz is ultrasound and is not perceptible by humans. Sound
Sound
waves below 20 Hz are known as infrasound
[...More...]

"Sound" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sound Wave
In physics, sound is a vibration that typically propagates as an audible wave of pressure, through a transmission medium such as a gas, liquid or solid. In human physiology and psychology, sound is the reception of such waves and their perception by the brain.[1] Humans can only hear sound waves as distinct pitches when the frequency lies between about 20 Hz and 20 kHz. Sound
Sound
above 20 kHz is ultrasound and is not perceptible by humans. Sound
Sound
waves below 20 Hz are known as infrasound
[...More...]

"Sound Wave" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Signal (information Theory)
A signal as referred to in communication systems, signal processing, and electrical engineering is a function that "conveys information about the behavior or attributes of some phenomenon".[1] In the physical world, any quantity exhibiting variation in time or variation in space (such as an image) is potentially a signal that might provide information on the status of a physical system, or convey a message between observers, among other possibilities.[2] The IEEE
IEEE
Transactions on Signal
[...More...]

"Signal (information Theory)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Loudspeaker
A loudspeaker (or loud-speaker or speaker) is an electroacoustic transducer;[1] which converts an electrical audio signal into a corresponding sound.[2] The most widely used type of speaker in the 2010s is the dynamic speaker, invented in 1925 by Edward W. Kellogg and Chester W. Rice. The dynamic speaker operates on the same basic principle as a dynamic microphone, but in reverse, to produce sound from an electrical signal. When an alternating current electrical audio signal is applied to its voice coil, a coil of wire suspended in a circular gap between the poles of a permanent magnet, the coil is forced to move rapidly back and forth due to Faraday's law of induction, which causes a diaphragm (usually conically shaped) attached to the coil to move back and forth, pushing on the air to create sound waves. Besides this most common method, there are several alternative technologies that can be used to convert an electrical signal into sound
[...More...]

"Loudspeaker" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.