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Taxicab
A taxicab, also known as a taxi or a cab, is a type of vehicle for hire with a driver, used by a single passenger or small group of passengers, often for a non-shared ride. A taxicab conveys passengers between locations of their choice
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First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Toronto
Toronto
Toronto
(/təˈrɒntoʊ/ ( listen) tə-RON-toh, locally  [təˈɹɑnoʊ] (help·info)), officially the City of Toronto, is the capital of the Canadian province of Ontario. It is located within the Golden Horseshoe
Golden Horseshoe
in Southern Ontario
Ontario
on the northern shore of Lake Ontario. With 2,731,571 residents in 2016, it is the largest city in Canada
Canada
and fourth-largest city in North America by population
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Strand, London
Strand (or the Strand[a]) is a major thoroughfare in the City of Westminster, Central London. It runs just over 3⁄4 mile (1,200 m) from Trafalgar Square
Trafalgar Square
eastwards to Temple Bar, where the road becomes Fleet Street
Fleet Street
inside the City of London, and is part of the A4, a main road running west from inner London. The road's name comes from the Old English
Old English
strond, meaning the edge of a river, as it historically ran alongside the north bank of the River Thames. The street was popular with the British upper classes between the 12th and 17th centuries, with many historically important mansions being built between the Strand and the river. These included Essex House, Arundel House, Somerset House, Savoy Palace, Durham House and Cecil House
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Saint Fiacre
Saint
Saint
Fiacre (Irish: Fiachra, Latin: Fiacrius) is the name of three different Irish saints, the most famous of which is Saint
Saint
Fiacre of Breuil (circa AD 600 – 18 August 670.[1]), the Catholic
Catholic
priest, abbot, hermit, and gardener of the seventh century who was famous for his sanctity and skill in curing infirmities. He emigrated from his native Ireland
Ireland
to France, where he constructed for himself a hermitage together with a vegetable and herb garden, oratory, and hospice for travelers. He is the patron saint of gardeners.[1]Contents1 Saint
Saint
Fiacre of Breuil1.1 Name 1.2 Life 1.3 Legends 1.4 Veneration 1.5 Patronage 1.6 Fiacre cabs2 Other St. Fiacres 3 See also 4 References 5 External links Saint
Saint
Fiacre of Breuil[edit] Name[edit] Fiachra is an ancient pre-Christian, Irish name
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Joseph Hansom
Joseph Aloysius Hansom (26 October 1803 – 29 June 1882) was a prolific English architect working principally in the Gothic Revival style. He invented the Hansom cab
Hansom cab
and founded the eminent architectural journal, The Builder, in 1843.Contents1 Career 2 Surviving works 3 Gallery of architectural work 4 Sources 5 References 6 External linksCareer[edit] Hansom was born at 114 Micklegate, York
York
(now the Brigantes pub) to a Roman Catholic family and baptised as Josephus Aloysius Handsom(e). He was the brother of the architect Charles Francis Hansom
Charles Francis Hansom
and the uncle of Edward J. Hansom
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Architect
An architect is a person who plans, designs, and reviews the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to provide services in connection with the design of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the buildings, that have as their principal purpose human occupancy or use.[1] Etymologically, architect derives from the Latin architectus, which derives from the Greek (arkhi-, chief + tekton, builder), i.e., chief builder.[2] Professionally, an architect's decisions affect public safety, and thus an architect must undergo specialized training consisting of advanced education and a practicum (or internship) for practical experience to earn a license to practice architecture
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York
York
York
(/ˈjɔːrk/ ( listen)) is a historic walled city at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss in North Yorkshire, England. The municipality is the traditional county town of the historic county of Yorkshire
Yorkshire
to which it gives its name. The city has a rich heritage and has provided the backdrop to major political events in England throughout much of its two millennia of existence. The city offers a wealth of historic attractions, of which York Minster is the most prominent, and a variety of cultural and sporting activities making it a popular tourist destination. The city was founded by the Romans as Eboracum
Eboracum
in 71 AD. It became the capital of the Roman province
Roman province
of Britannia Inferior, and later of the kingdoms of Northumbria
Northumbria
and Jórvík
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John Chapman (engineer)
John Chapman (1801–1854) was an English engineer and writer. At different times in his career, he was involved with lace-making machinery, journalism, Hansom cabs and the promotion of railways, cotton and irrigation in India.Contents1 Life 2 In London 3 Lobbyist for Indian development 4 Last years 5 Works 6 Family 7 See also 8 Notes 9 External linksLife[edit] He was born at Loughborough, Leicestershire, on 20 January 1801, the eldest of the three surviving sons of John Chapman, a clockmaker there. He received his education first at a school kept by Mr. Mowbray, and then under the Rev. T. Stevenson; he taught himself Greek, and paid a French workman of his father's to teach him French. With other young people he was an involved in the establishment of the Loughborough Permanent Library; and by 1817 he was devoting his Sundays to teaching in the Sunday school, and had become secretary of a peace society, and of the Hampden Club, of which his father was president
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St Petersburg
Saint
Saint
Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, tr. Sankt-Peterburg, IPA: [ˈsankt pʲɪtʲɪrˈburk] ( listen)) is Russia's second-largest city after Moscow, with five million inhabitants in 2012.[9] An important Russian port on the Baltic Sea, it has a status of a federal subject (a federal city). Situated on the Neva
Neva
River, at the head of the Gulf of Finland
Gulf of Finland
on the Baltic Sea, it was founded by Tsar
Tsar
Peter the Great
Peter the Great
on May 27 [O.S. 16] 1703
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Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft
Daimler Motoren Gesellschaft
Daimler Motoren Gesellschaft
(DMG) (Daimler Motors Corporation) was a German engineer and later automobile manufacturer, in operation from 1890 until 1926. Founded by Gottlieb Daimler
Gottlieb Daimler
and Wilhelm Maybach, it was based first in Cannstatt (today Bad Cannstatt, a city district of Stuttgart). Daimler died in 1900, and their business moved in 1903 to Stuttgart- Untertürkheim
Untertürkheim
after the original factory was destroyed by fire, and again to Berlin in 1922
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Electricity
Electricity
Electricity
is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and motion of electric charge. Although initially considered a phenomenon separate from magnetism, since the development of Maxwell's equations, both are recognized as part of a single phenomenon: electromagnetism. Various common phenomena are related to electricity, including lightning, static electricity, electric heating, electric discharges and many others. The presence of an electric charge, which can be either positive or negative, produces an electric field. The movement of electric charges is an electric current and produces a magnetic field. When a charge is placed in a location with a non-zero electric field, a force will act on it. The magnitude of this force is given by Coulomb's law. Thus, if that charge were to move, the electric field would be doing work on the electric charge
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Electric Vehicle Company
Electric Vehicle
Electric Vehicle
Company was an American automobile holding company and early pioneering manufacturer of automobiles.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]E.V.C. Hansom Cab, ca. 1904The Electric Vehicle
Electric Vehicle
Company was founded 27 September 1897 as a holding company of battery-powered electric vehicle manufacturers made up of several companies assembled by Isaac Rice.[1][2] Rice had acquired in May, 1897 another electric cab manufacturer, the Electric Carriage & Wagon Company (E.C.W.C.) in New York. Their vehicles were constructed by Henry G. Morris and Pedro G. Salom, builders of the Electrobats, the first truly useful electric automobiles in the USA.[3] E.V.W.C. pioneered a cab system that included service stations for quick change of battery sets, and repair work; vehicles were leased only, not sold
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Friedrich Wilhelm Gustav Bruhn
Friedrich Wilhelm Gustav Bruhn
Friedrich Wilhelm Gustav Bruhn
(born 11 November 1853 in Lübeck; died 1927 in Berlin) was a German inventor.Contents1 Life 2 Literature 3 External links 4 ReferencesLife[edit] Bruhn invented modern taximeter in Berlin. He worked for German company Westendarp & Pieper Hamburg. In 1920 he became leader of this company. Bruhn was married and had three children. His daughter Adele married architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. His son Wolfgang Bruhn was an art historian. Literature[edit]Zeitschrift für das gesamte Local- und Straßenbahn-Wesen, Bde. 8–10, Bergmann 1889, S. 158. Der Motorwagen. Automobiltechnische Zeitschrift, 25:1922, S. 123. Zeitschrift für Flugtechnik und Motorluftschifffahrt, Bd
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Gottlieb Daimler
Gottlieb Wilhelm Daimler (German: [ˈɡɔtliːp ˈdaɪmlɐ]; 17 March 1834 – 6 March 1900)[1] was an engineer, industrial designer and industrialist born in Schorndorf
Schorndorf
(Kingdom of Württemberg, a federal state of the German Confederation), in what is now Germany. He was a pioneer of internal-combustion engines and automobile development. He invented the high-speed liquid petroleum fueled engine. Daimler and his lifelong business partner Wilhelm Maybach
Wilhelm Maybach
were two inventors whose goal was to create small, high-speed engines to be mounted in any kind of locomotion device. In 1883 they designed a horizontal cylinder layout compressed charge liquid petroleum engine that fulfilled Daimler's desire for a high speed engine which could be throttled, making it useful in transportation applications
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