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Tate Britain
Tate
Tate
Britain (known from 1897 to 1932 as the National Gallery
National Gallery
of British Art and from 1932 to 2000 as the Tate
Tate
Gallery) is an art museum on Millbank
Millbank
in the City of Westminster
City of Westminster
in London. It is part of the Tate
Tate
network of galleries in England, with Tate
Tate
Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate
Tate
St Ives. It is the oldest gallery in the network, having opened in 1897. It houses a substantial collection of the art of the United Kingdom since Tudor times, and in particular has large holdings of the works of J. M. W. Turner, who bequeathed all his own collection to the nation
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Postmodern Architecture
Postmodern
Postmodern
architecture is a style or movement which emerged in the 1960s as a reaction against the austerity, formality, and lack of variety of modern architecture, particularly in the international style advocated by Le Corbusier
Le Corbusier
and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. The movement was given a doctrine by the architect and architectural theorist Robert Venturi
Robert Venturi
in his 1966 book Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture. The style flourished from the 1980s through the 1990s, particularly in the work of Venturi, Philip Johnson, Charles Moore and Michael Graves
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List Of Largest Art Museums In The World
This list of largest art museums in the world ranks art museums and other museums that contain mostly pieces of art by the best available estimates of total exhibition space.Contents1 Methodology 2 Largest art museums 3 Large museums with unknown or unreliable figures 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesMethodology[edit] Only gallery space is to be considered, not be confused with the total space inside the building (which is generally three times larger). The museum should be mainly composed of human made artifacts with an important aesthetical dimension (i.e
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Sam Taylor-Wood
Samantha Louise Taylor-Johnson[1][2] OBE (née Taylor-Wood, born 4 March 1967) is an English filmmaker and photographer. Her directorial feature film debut came in 2009 with Nowhere Boy, a film based on the childhood experiences of the Beatles songwriter and singer John Lennon. She is one of a group of artists known as the Young British Artists.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Fine art 2.2 Nowhere Boy 2.3 Other music, film and television work3 Discography 4 Filmography 5 Personal life5.1 Marriages and children6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] She was born Samantha Taylor-Wood in Croydon, London.[3] Her father, David, left the family when she was nine.[4] Her mother, Geraldine, is a yoga teacher and astrologer
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Damien Hirst
Damien Steven Hirst (/hɜːrst/; born 7 June 1965) is an English artist, entrepreneur, and art collector.[1] He is one of the Young British Artists (YBAs), who dominated the art scene in the UK during the 1990s.[2][3] He is reportedly the United Kingdom's richest living artist, with his wealth valued at £215M in the 2010 Sunday Times Rich List.[4][5] During the 1990s his career was closely linked with the collector Charles Saatchi, but increasing frictions came to a head in 2003 and the relationship ended.[6] Death is a central theme in Hirst's works.[7][8] He became famous for a series of artworks in which dead animals (including a shark, a sheep and a cow) are preserved—sometimes having been dissected—in formaldehyde. The best known of these was The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living, a 14-foot (4.3 m) tiger shark immersed in formaldehyde in a clear display case
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Heritage Lottery Fund
The Heritage Lottery Fund
Heritage Lottery Fund
(HLF) distributes a share of National Lottery funding, supporting a wide range of heritage projects across the United Kingdom. Since it was set up in 1994, under the National Lottery Act, it has awarded over £7.1billion to more than 40,000 projects, large and small, helping people across the UK explore, enjoy and protect their heritage. HLF supports all kinds of projects, as long as they make a lasting difference for heritage, people and communities. These vary from restoring natural landscapes to rescuing neglected buildings, from recording diverse community histories to providing life-changing skills training.Contents1 Income 2 Funding 3 Administration 4 Offices 5 Funding programmes 6 Research 7 External linksIncome[edit] The income of all the National Lottery distributors comes from the sale of National Lottery tickets. Of every £2 spent on a ticket, 56 pence (28 per cent) goes to the "good causes"
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Listed Building
A listed building or listed structure is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England
Historic England
in England, Historic Environment Scotland
Historic Environment Scotland
in Scotland, Cadw
Cadw
in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland. The term has also been used in Ireland, where buildings are surveyed for the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
in accordance with the country's obligations under the Granada Convention. However, the preferred term in Ireland is protected structure.[1] A listed building may not be demolished, extended, or altered without special permission from the local planning authority, which typically consults the relevant central government agency, particularly for significant alterations to the more notable listed buildings
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River Thames
The River Thames
River Thames
(/tɛmz/ ( listen) TEMZ) is a river that flows through southern England, most notably through London. At 215 miles (346 km), it is the longest river entirely in England
England
and the second longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn. It also flows through Oxford
Oxford
(where it is called Isis), Reading, Henley-on-Thames
Henley-on-Thames
and Windsor. The lower reaches of the river are called the Tideway, derived from its long tidal reach up to Teddington Lock. It rises at Thames Head
Thames Head
in Gloucestershire, and flows into the North Sea
North Sea
via the Thames Estuary
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Dome
A dome (from Latin: domus) is an architectural element that resembles the hollow upper half of a sphere. The precise definition has been a matter of controversy. There are also a wide variety of forms and specialized terms to describe them. A dome can rest upon a rotunda or drum, and can be supported by columns or piers that transition to the dome through squinches or pendentives. A lantern may cover an oculus and may itself have another dome. Domes have a long architectural lineage that extends back into prehistory and they have been constructed from mud, snow, stone, wood, brick, concrete, metal, glass, and plastic over the centuries. The symbolism associated with domes includes mortuary, celestial, and governmental traditions that have likewise developed over time. Domes have been found from early Mesopotamia, which may explain the form's spread
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Portico
A portico (from Italian) is a porch leading to the entrance of a building, or extended as a colonnade, with a roof structure over a walkway, supported by columns or enclosed by walls. This idea was widely used in Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
and has influenced many cultures, including most Western cultures. Some noteworthy examples of porticos are the East Portico
Portico
of the United States Capitol, the portico adorning the Pantheon in Rome
Rome
and the portico of University College London. Porticos are sometimes topped with pediments. Palladio
Palladio
was a pioneer of using temple-fronts for secular buildings
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Peter Blake (artist)
Sir Peter Thomas Blake, CBE, RDI, RA (born 25 June 1932) is an English pop artist, best known for co-creating the sleeve design for the Beatles' album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. His other best known works include the cover of the Band Aid single "Do They Know It's Christmas?", and the Live Aid
Live Aid
concert poster.[1] Blake also designed the 2012 Brit Award
Brit Award
statuette.[2] One of the best known British pop artists, Blake is considered to be a prominent figure in the pop art movement.[1] Central to his paintings are his interest in images from popular culture which have infused his collages. In 2002 he was knighted at Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace
for his services to art.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Work 4 Honours 5 Personal life 6 Bibliography 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Peter Blake was born in Dartford, Kent, on 25 June 1932
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Yale Center For British Art
The Yale Center for British Art
Yale Center for British Art
at Yale University
Yale University
in downtown New Haven, Connecticut, houses the largest and most comprehensive collection of British art
British art
outside the United Kingdom. The collection of paintings, sculpture, drawings, prints, rare books, and manuscripts reflects the development of British art
British art
and culture from the Elizabethan period onward.Contents1 Creation 2 Collection 3 Collection of the Yale Center for British Art 4 References 5 External linksCreation[edit] The Center was established by a gift from Paul Mellon
Paul Mellon
(Yale College Class of 1929) of his British art
British art
collection to Yale in 1966, together with an endowment for operations of the Center, and funds for a building to house the works of art. The building was designed by Louis I
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Peter Paul Rubens
Sir Peter Paul Rubens
Peter Paul Rubens
(/ˈruːbənz/;[1] Dutch: [ˈrybə(n)s]; 28 June 1577 – 30 May 1640) was a Flemish artist. He is considered the most influential artist of Flemish Baroque
Baroque
tradition. Rubens' highly charged compositions reference erudite aspects of classical and Christian history. His unique and immensely popular Baroque
Baroque
style emphasized movement, color, and sensuality, which followed the immediate, dramatic artistic style promoted in the Counter-Reformation
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SW Postcode Area
Postcode district boundaries: Google Template:Attached KML/SW postcode area KML is from Wikidata London
London
SW postcode areaSWPostcode area SWPostcode area name London
London
SWPost towns 1Postcode districts 29Postcode sectors 139Postcodes (live) 21,046Postcodes (total) 34,726Statistics as at February 2012[1]The SW (South Western) postcode area, also known as the London
London
SW postcode area,[2] is a group of postcode districts covering part of southwest London, England. The area originates from the South Western (SW1–SW10) and Battersea
Battersea
(SW11–SW20) districts[3] of the London post town.Contents1 Postal administration1.1 List of postcode districts 1.2 SW12 Boundaries 3 Map 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPostal administration[edit] The postcode area originated in 1857 as the SW district
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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The Cholmondeley Ladies
The Cholmondeley Ladies
The Cholmondeley Ladies
is an early 17th century English oil painting depicting two women seated upright and side by side in bed, each holding a baby. Measuring 886×1723 mm, it was painted on a wooden panel, probably in the first decade of the 17th century. According to an inscription in gold lettering to the bottom left of the painting, it shows "Two Ladies of the Cholmondeley Family, Who were born the same day, Married the same day, And brought to Bed the same day." At first sight, the two women and their two babies appear almost identical, each mother wearing white clothes decorated with elaborate lace and jewellery, and each baby swaddled in a scarlet christening robe. On closer inspection, the details of the clothing of each pair and their eye colours differ
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