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Targhee National Forest
Caribou-Targhee National Forest
Caribou-Targhee National Forest
is located in the states of Idaho
Idaho
and Wyoming, with a small section in Utah
Utah
in the United States. The forest is broken into several separate sections and extends over 2.63 million acres (10,600 km2). To the east the forest borders Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park
Grand Teton National Park
and Bridger-Teton National Forest. Most of the forest is a part of the 20-million-acre (81,000 km2) Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.Contents1 Description 2 Wilderness
Wilderness
areas 3 Counties3.1 Caribou National Forest 3.2 Targhee National Forest4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] Caribou and Targhee National Forests were combined from original forest lands created in 1891
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IUCN
The International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN; officially International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
and Natural Resources[2]) is an international organization working in the field of nature conservation and sustainable use of natural resources. It is involved in data gathering and analysis, research, field projects, advocacy, and education. IUCN's mission is to "influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable". Over the past decades, IUCN has widened its focus beyond conservation ecology and now incorporates issues related to sustainable development in its projects. Unlike many other international environmental organisations, IUCN does not itself aim to mobilize the public in support of nature conservation
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Cutthroat Trout
The cutthroat trout ( Oncorhynchus
Oncorhynchus
clarkii) is a fish species of the family Salmonidae
Salmonidae
native to cold-water tributaries of the Pacific Ocean, Rocky Mountains, and Great Basin
Great Basin
in North America. As a member of the genus Oncorhynchus, it is one of the Pacific trout, a group that includes the widely distributed rainbow trout. Cutthroat trout are popular gamefish, especially among anglers who enjoy fly fishing. The common name "cutthroat" refers to the distinctive red coloration on the underside of the lower jaw. The specific name clarkii was given to honor explorer William Clark, coleader of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Cutthroat trout
Cutthroat trout
usually inhabit and spawn in small to moderately large, clear, well-oxygenated, shallow rivers with gravel bottoms. They also reproduce in clear, cold, moderately deep lakes
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Cinnamon Bear
The cinnamon bear (Ursus americanus cinnamomum) is both a color phase and subspecies of the American black bear, native to central and western areas of the United States and Canada. Established populations are found in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Idaho, Montana, Washington, Manitoba, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Wyoming, California, Alberta, and British Columbia.[1][2] They also have been seen in Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and New York. The most striking difference between a cinnamon bear and any other black bear is its brown or red-brown fur, reminiscent of cinnamon.[2] The subspecies was given this designation because the lighter color phase is more common there than in other areas.[clarification needed] Description[edit] Like other black bear subspecies, cinnamon bears are omnivorous. Their diet includes fruit, vegetation, nuts, honey, and occasionally insects, and meat, varying from other subspecies because of regional habitat differences
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Northwestern Wolf
The northwestern wolf ( Canis
Canis
lupus occidentalis), also known as the Mackenzie Valley wolf, Alaskan timber wolf,[4] Canadian timber wolf, or northern timber wolf,[5] is a subspecies of gray wolf in western North America
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Rocky Mountain Elk
The Rocky Mountain elk
Rocky Mountain elk
( Cervus
Cervus
canadensis nelsoni) is a subspecies of elk found in the Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
and adjacent ranges of Western North America. The winter ranges are most common in open forests and floodplain marshes in the lower elevations. In the summer it migrates to the subalpine forests and alpine basins. Elk
Elk
have a diverse habitat range that they can reside in but are most often found in forest and forest edge habitat and in mountain regions they often stay in higher elevations during warmer months and migrate down lower in the winter. They may even come down the mountain and leave the forest into some grassland for part of the day but head back into the timber in the evening
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Moose
The moose (North America) or elk (Eurasia), Alces alces, is the largest extant species in the deer family. Moose
Moose
are distinguished by the broad, flat (or palmate) antlers of the males; other members of the family have antlers with a dendritic ("twig-like") configuration. Moose
Moose
typically inhabit boreal forests and temperate broadleaf and mixed forests of the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
in temperate to subarctic climates. Hunting
Hunting
and other human activities have caused a reduction in the size of the moose's range over time. Moose
Moose
have been reintroduced to some of their former habitats. Currently, most moose are found in Canada, Alaska, New England, Fennoscandia, Baltic states, and Russia. Their diet consists of both terrestrial and aquatic vegetation. The most common moose predators are the gray wolf along with bears and humans
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Mule Deer
10, but some disputed (see text)Distribution map of subspecies: West Virginia   Sitka black-tailed deer (O. h. sitkensis)    Black-tailed deer
Black-tailed deer
(O. h. columbianus)    California mule deer
California mule deer
(O. h. californicus)   Southern mule deer (O. h. fuliginatus)   Peninsula mule deer (O. h. peninsulae)   Desert mule deer (O. h. eremicus)    Rocky Mountain
Rocky Mountain
mule deer (O. h
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Plains Bison
Bison
Bison
bison montanaeThe Plains bison
Plains bison
( Bison
Bison
bison bison) is one of two subspecies/ecotypes of the American bison, the other being the wood bison (B. b. athabascae).[2][3][4][5][6][a] A natural population of Plains bison survives in Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone National Park
(the Yellowstone Park bison herd consisting of about 3,000 bison) and multiple smaller reintroduced herds of bison in many places in Canada and the United States.Contents1 Near-extinction and reintroduction of herds 2 Uses 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksNear-extinction and reintroduction of herds[edit] At one time, at least 25 million American bison
American bison
were spread across the United States and Canada. However, by the late 1880s, the total number of bison in the United States had been reduced to fewer than 600 individuals
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North American Cougar
The North American cougar
North American cougar
(Puma concolor couguar), is the cougar subspecies once commonly found in eastern North America, and still prevalent in the western half of the continent.[3] The subspecies encompasses cougars found in the United States, western Canada, the critically endangered Florida panther
Florida panther
population, and the extinct[4] Eastern cougar
Eastern cougar
population. Western populations of the cougar are occasionally seen in the former range of the extinct Eastern population.Contents1 Taxonomic history 2 Distribution2.1 Sightings in the eastern United States3 Ecology 4 Cultural significance 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksTaxonomic history[edit] As of 2017, P. c
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Pronghorn
A. a. americana A. a. mexicana A. a. oregona A. a. peninsularis A. a. sonoriensisRange of the PronghornThe pronghorn ( /ˈprɒŋˌhɔːrn/)[3] (Antilocapra americana) is a species of artiodactyl mammal indigenous to interior western and central North America
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Peregrine Falcon
17–19, see textGlobal range of F. peregrinus      Breeding summer visitor     Breeding resident     Winter visitor     Passage visitorSynonymsFalco atriceps Hume Falco kreyenborgi Kleinschmidt, 1929Falco pelegrinoides madens Ripley & Watson, 1963 Rhynchodon peregrinus (Tunstall, 1771) and see textThe peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus), also known as the peregrine,[2] and historically as the duck hawk in North America,[3] is a widespread bird of prey in the family Falconidae. A large, crow-sized falcon, it has a blue-grey back, barred white underparts, and a black head
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Brook Trout
S. f. agassizii (Garman, 1885)† S. f. timagamiensis Henn & Rinckenbach, 1925Synonyms[1]previous scientific names Salmo
Salmo
fontinalis Mitchill, 1814 Baione fontinalis (Mitchill, 1814) Salmo
Salmo
canadensis Griffith & Smith, 1834 Salmo
Salmo
hudsonicus Suckley, 1861 Salvelinus
Salvelinus
timagamiensis Henn & Rinckenbach, 1925The brook trout ( Salvelinus
Salvelinus
fontinalis) is a species of freshwater fish in the salmon family Salmonidae. It is native to Eastern North America in the United States
United States
and Canada, but has been introduced elsewhere in North America
North America
and to other continents
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Camassia
Camassia
Camassia
is a genus of plants in the asparagus family native to Canada and the United States. Common names include camas, quamash, Indian hyacinth, camash, and wild hyacinth. It grows in the wild in great numbers in moist meadows. They are perennial plants with basal linear leaves measuring 8 to 32 inches (20 to 81 cm) in length, which emerge early in the spring. They grow to a height of 12 to 50 inches (30 to 127 cm), with a multi-flowered stem rising above the main plant in summer. The six-petaled flowers vary in color from pale lilac or white to deep purple or blue-violet
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Pike (fish)
Esox
Esox
is a genus of freshwater fish, the only living genus in the family Esocidae—the esocids which were endemic to North America
North America
and Eurasia
Eurasia
during the Paleogene through present.[2] The species of this genus are known as pike and pickerel.[3][4] The type species is E. lucius, the northern pike. The big pike species are native to the Palearctic
Palearctic
and Nearctic ecozones, ranging across northern North America
North America
and from Western Europe to Siberia
Siberia
in Eurasia. Pikes have the elongated, torpedo-like form of predatory fishes, with sharply pointed heads and sharp teeth. Their coloration is typically grey-green with a mottled or spotted appearance with stripes along their backs, providing camouflage among weeds. Individual pike marking patterns are unique, like fingerprints
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Stream
A stream is a body of water[1] with surface water flowing within the bed and banks of a channel. The stream encompasses surface and groundwater fluxes that respond to geological, geomorphological, hydrological and biotic controls[2]. Depending on its location or certain characteristics, a stream may be referred to by a variety of local or regional names. Streams are important as conduits in the water cycle, instruments in groundwater recharge, and corridors for fish and wildlife migration. The biological habitat in the immediate vicinity of a stream is called a riparian zone. Given the status of the ongoing Holocene extinction, streams play an important corridor role in connecting fragmented habitats and thus in conserving biodiversity
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