HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy
Takotsubo
Takotsubo
cardiomyopathy, also known as stress cardiomyopathy, is a type of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy in which there is a sudden temporary weakening of the muscular portion of the heart.[3] This weakening may be triggered by emotional stress, such as the death of a loved one, a break-up, rejection from a partner or constant anxiety. This leads to one of the common names, broken heart syndrome.[4] Stress cardiomyopathy is now a well-recognized cause of acute heart failure, lethal ventricular arrhythmias, and ventricular rupture.[5] The name "takotsubo syndrome" comes from the Japanese word takotsubo (ja) "octopus trap," because the l
[...More...]

Specialty (medicine)
A specialty, or speciality, in medicine is a branch of medical practice. After completing medical school, physicians or surgeons usually further their medical education in a specific specialty of medicine by completing a multiple year residency to become a medical specialist.[1]Contents1 History of medical specialization 2 Classification of medical specialization 3 Specialties that are common worldwide 4 List of specialties recognized in the European Union and European Economic Area 5 List of North American medical specialties and others 6 Physician
Physician
compensation 7 Specialties by country7.1 Australia and New Zealand 7.2 Canada 7.3 Germany 7.4 India 7.5 United States 7.6 Specialty and Physician
Physician
Location8 Other uses 9 Training 10 Satisfaction 11 See also 12 ReferencesHistory of medical specialization[edit] To a certain extent, medical practitioners have always been specialized
[...More...]

picture info

Aspirin
Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is a medication used to treat pain, fever, or inflammation.[4] Specific inflammatory conditions in which aspirin is used include Kawasaki disease, pericarditis, and rheumatic fever.[4] Aspirin
Aspirin
given shortly after a heart attack decreases the risk of death.[4] Aspirin
[...More...]

picture info

Coronary Artery Disease
Coronary artery
Coronary artery
disease (CAD), also known as ischemic heart disease (IHD),[13] refers to a group of diseases which includes stable angina, unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death.[14] It is within the group of cardiovascular diseases of which it is the most common type.[15] A common symptom is chest pain or discomfort which may travel into the shoulder, arm, back, neck, or jaw.[4] Occasionally it may feel like heartburn
[...More...]

Pathognomonic
Pathognomonic (often misspelled as pathognomic and sometimes as pathomnemonic) is a term, often used in medicine, that means characteristic for a particular disease. A pathognomonic sign is a particular sign whose presence means that a particular disease is present beyond any doubt. Labelling a sign or symptom "pathognomonic" represents a marked intensification of a "diagnostic" sign or symptom. The word is an adjective of Greek origin derived from πάθος pathos "disease" and γνώμων gnomon "indicator" (from γιγνώσκω gignosko "I know, I recognize").Contents1 Practical use 2 Examples 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPractical use[edit] While some findings may be classic, typical or highly suggestive in a certain condition, they may not occur uniquely in this condition and therefore may not directly imply a specific diagnosis
[...More...]

Akinetic
The combining form -kinesis, from Greek κίνησις, "movement, motion," denotes movement, being the suffix form of the word kinesis.Cytokinesis, the step of cell division following telophase of mitosis, when the cytoplasm is divided into two of roughly equal proportion to the two new daughter cells
[...More...]

picture info

Dyskinetic
Tardive dyskinesia
Tardive dyskinesia
(TD) is a disorder that results in involuntary, repetitive body movements.[1] This may include grimacing, sticking out the tongue or smacking of the lips.[1] Additionally there may be rapid jerking movements or slow writhing movements.[1] In about 20% of people, decreased functioning results.[3] Tardive dyskinesia
[...More...]

picture info

Systole (medicine)
The systole /ˈsɪstəliː/ is that part of the cardiac cycle during which some chambers of the heart muscle contract after refilling with blood.[2] The term "systole" originates from New Latin via Ancient Greek συστολή (sustolē): from συστέλλειν (sustellein, "to contract") via [σύν (syn, "together") + στέλλειν (stellein, "send"). The use of systole, "to contract", is very similar to the use of the English term "to squeeze". The mammalian heart has four chambers: the left atrium above the left ventricle (lighter pink, see graphic), which two are connected through the mitral (or bicuspid) valve; and the right atrium above the right ventricle (lighter blue), connected through the tricuspid valve. The atria are the receiving chambers for the circulation of blood and the ventricles are the discharging chambers. When, in late ventricular diastole, the atrial chambers contract, they send blood down to the larger, lower ventricle chambers
[...More...]

picture info

Echocardiography
An echocardiogram, often referred to as a cardiac echo or simply an echo, is a sonogram of the heart. (It is not abbreviated as ECG, because that is an abbreviation for an electrocardiogram.) Echocardiography
Echocardiography
uses standard two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and Doppler ultrasound to create images of the heart. Echocardiography
Echocardiography
has become routinely used in the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of patients with any suspected or known heart diseases. It is one of the most widely used diagnostic tests in cardiology. It can provide a wealth of helpful information, including the size and shape of the heart (internal chamber size quantification), pumping capacity, and the location and extent of any tissue damage
[...More...]

picture info

Sinus Tachycardia
Sinus tachycardia
Sinus tachycardia
(also colloquially known as sinus tach or sinus tachy) is a sinus rhythm with an elevated rate of impulses, defined as a rate greater than 100 beats/min (bpm) in an average adult. The normal resting heart rate in the average male adult ranges from 60–100 bpm and women 60-90bpm. Note that the normal heart rate varies with age, with infants having normal heart rate of 110–150 bpm, in contrast to the elderly, who have slower normals.[1]Contents1 Signs and symptoms 2 Cause 3 Diagnosis3.1 ECG
ECG
characteristics 3.2 Inappropriate sinus tachycardia 3.3 Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome4 Treatment 5 ReferencesSigns and symptoms[edit] Tachycardia
Tachycardia
is often asymptomatic
[...More...]

picture info

ST Segment
In electrocardiography, the ST segment
ST segment
connects the QRS complex
QRS complex
and the T wave
T wave
and has a duration of 0.005 to 0.150 sec (5 to 150 ms). It starts at the J point (junction between the QRS complex
QRS complex
and ST segment) and ends at the beginning of the T wave. However, since it is usually difficult to determine exactly where the ST segment
ST segment
ends and the T wave
T wave
begins, the relationship between the ST segment
ST segment
and T wave should be examined together. The typical ST segment
ST segment
duration is usually around 0.08 sec (80 ms)
[...More...]

picture info

T Wave
In electrocardiography, the T wave
T wave
represents the repolarization, or recovery, of the ventricles. The interval from the beginning of the QRS complex
QRS complex
to the apex of the T wave
T wave
is referred to as the absolute refractory period. The last half of the T wave
T wave
is referred to as the relative refractory period or vulnerable period. The T wave
T wave
contains more information than the QT interval. The T wave
T wave
can be described by its symmetry, skewness, slope of ascending and descending limbs, amplitude and subintervals like the Tpeak–Tend interval.[1] In most leads, the T wave
T wave
is positive. This is due to the repolarization of the membrane. During ventricle contraction (QRS complex), the heart depolarizes
[...More...]

picture info

Congestive Heart Failure
Heart
Heart
failure (HF), often referred to as congestive heart failure (CHF), is when the heart is unable to pump sufficiently to maintain blood flow to meet the body's needs.[9][10][11] Signs and symptoms commonly include shortness of breath, excessive tiredness, and leg swelling.[2] The shortness of breath is usually worse with exercise, while lying down, and may wake the person at night.[2] A limited ability to exercise is also a common feature.[12] Chest pain, including angina, does not typically occur due to heart failure.[13] Common causes of heart failure include coronary artery di
[...More...]

Dyspnea
Shortness of breath, also known as dyspnea, is a feeling like one cannot breathe well enough. The American Thoracic Society defines it as "a subjective experience of breathing discomfort that consists of qualitatively distinct sensations that vary in intensity", and recommends evaluating dyspnea by assessing the intensity of the distinct sensations, the degree of distress involved, and its burden or impact on activities of daily living. Distinct sensations include effort/work, chest tightness, and air hunger (the feeling of not enough oxygen).[1] Dyspnea is a normal symptom of heavy exertion but becomes pathological if it occurs in unexpected situations[2] or light exertion
[...More...]

Low Blood Pressure
Hypotension is low blood pressure, especially in the arteries of the systemic circulation.[1] Blood pressure
Blood pressure
is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps out blood. A systolic blood pressure of less than 90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or diastolic of less than 60 mm Hg is generally considered to be hypotension.[2][3] However, in practice, blood pressure is considered too low only if noticeable symptoms are present.[4] Hypotension is the opposite of hypertension, which is high blood pressure. It is best understood as a physiological state, rather than a disease
[...More...]

picture info

Blood Clotting
Coagulation
Coagulation
(also known as clotting) is the process by which blood changes from a liquid to a gel, forming a blood clot. It potentially results in hemostasis, the cessation of blood loss from a damaged vessel, followed by repair. The mechanism of coagulation involves activation, adhesion, and aggregation of platelets along with deposition and maturation of fibrin. Disorders of coagulation are disease states which can result in bleeding (hemorrhage or bruising) or obstructive clotting (thrombosis).[1] Coagulation
Coagulation
is highly conserved throughout biology; in all mammals, coagulation involves both a cellular (platelet) and a protein (coagulation factor) component.[2] The system in humans has been the most extensively researched and is the best understood.[3] Coagulation
Coagulation
begins almost instantly after an injury to the blood vessel has damaged the endothelium lining the vessel
[...More...]

.