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Takoba
Takoba
Takoba
(also takuba or takouba) is the sword that is used across the western Sahel
Sahel
and among ethnic groups such as the Tuareg, the Hausa, and the Fulani. It usually measures about one meter in length. Takoba blades are straight and double edged with a pronounced tapering towards the tip; they can exhibit several notable features, including three or more hand-ground fuller grooves and a rounded point.[1] Since the Tuareg have an aversion to touching iron, the takoba's hilt, like many iron implements, is fully covered. Typically the simple but deep crossguard is of iron sheet, or iron-framed wood, covered in tooled leather, and occasionally sheathed in brass or silver; the grip is also often leather-covered but the pommel is always of metal, often brass or copper, sometimes iron or silver.[2] Alternatively the whole hilt can be covered in brass or silver sheathing. The scabbard is made of elaborately tooled leather
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Post-classical History
Post-classical history
Post-classical history
(also called the Post-Antiquity era, Post-Ancient Era, or Pre-Modern Era) is a periodization commonly used by the school of "world history" instead of Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(Medieval) which is roughly synonymous.[1] The period runs from about 500 to 1450 AD though there may be regional differences and debates. The era was globally characterized by the expansion of civilizations geographically, the development of three of the great world religions (Christianity, Islam, and Buddhism), and development of networks of trade between civilizations.[2][1] In Asia, the spread of Islam
Islam
created a new empire and Islamic Golden Age with trade between the Asian, African and European continents, and advances in science in the medieval Islamic world
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European Dueling Sword
A duel is an arranged engagement in combat between two people, with matched weapons, in accordance with agreed-upon rules. Duels in this form were chiefly practiced in early modern Europe with precedents in the medieval code of chivalry, and continued into the modern period (19th to early 20th centuries) especially among military officers. During the 17th and 18th centuries (and earlier), duels were mostly fought with swords (the rapier, and later the smallsword), but beginning in the late 18th century in England, duels were more commonly fought using pistols. Fencing
Fencing
and pistol duels continued to co-exist throughout the 19th century. The duel was based on a code of honor
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Sahel
The Sahel
Sahel
(/səˈhɛl/)[1] is the ecoclimatic and biogeographic zone of transition in Africa
Africa
between the Sahara
Sahara
to the north and the Sudanian Savanna
Sudanian Savanna
to the south. Having a semi-arid climate, it stretches across the south-central latitudes of Northern Africa between the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and the Red Sea
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Falx
The "Falx" was a weapon with a curved blade that was sharp on the inside edge used by the Thracians and Dacians – and, later, a siege hook used by the Romans themselves.Contents1 Etymology 2 Dacian falx2.1 Effectiveness3 Thracian falx 4 Development 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] "Falx" is a Latin word originally meaning sickle but was later used to mean any of a number of tools that had a curved blade that was sharp on the inside edge such as a scythe. Falx was also used to mean a weapon – particularly that of the Thracians and Dacians – and, later, a siege hook used by the Romans themselves. Dacian falx[edit]Dacian Weaponry including a falx (top) exhibited in Cluj National History Museum[1]In Latin texts, the weapon was described as an ensis falcatus (whence falcata) by Ovid in Metamorphose and as a falx supina by Juvenal in Satiriae. The Dacian falx came in two sizes: one-handed and two-handed
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Rhomphaia
The rhomphaia was a close-combat bladed weapon used by the Thracians as early as 400 BC. Rhomphaias were polearms with a straight or slightly curved single-edged blade attached to a pole, which in most cases was considerably shorter than the blade. Although the rhomphaia was similar to the falx, most archaeological evidence suggests that rhomphaias were forged with straight or slightly curved blades, presumably to enable their use as both a thrusting and slashing weapon. The blade was constructed of iron and used a triangular cross section to accommodate the single cutting edge with a tang of rectangular cross section. Length varied, but a typical rhomphaia would have a blade of approximately 60–80 cm and a tang of approximately 50 cm
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Ancient History
Ancient history
Ancient history
is the aggregate of past events[1] from the beginning of recorded human history and extending as far as the Early Middle Ages or the Post-classical Era. The span of recorded history is roughly 5,000 years, beginning with Sumerian Cuneiform
Cuneiform
script, the oldest discovered form of coherent writing from the protoliterate period around the 30th century BC.[2] The term classical antiquity is often used to refer to history in the Old World
Old World
from the beginning of recorded Greek history
Greek history
in 776 BC (First Olympiad). This roughly coincides with the traditional date of the founding of Rome in 753 BC, the beginning of the history of ancient Rome, and the beginning of the Archaic period in Ancient Greece
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Early Modern Period
The early modern period of modern history follows the late Middle Ages of the post-classical era. Although the chronological limits of the period are open to debate, the timeframe spans the period after the late portion of the post-classical age (c. 1500), known as the Middle Ages, through the beginning of the Age of Revolutions (c
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Fuller (weapon)
A fuller is a rounded or beveled longitudinal groove or slot along the flat side of a blade (e.g. a sword, knife, or bayonet) that is made using a blacksmithing tool called a spring swage or, like the groove, a fuller. A fuller is often used to lighten the blade. Similarly, the shape of an I-beam
I-beam
allows a given amount of strength to be achieved with use of less material. These grooves are often called "blood grooves" or "blood gutters", although their purpose has nothing to do with blood. When combined with proper distal tapers, heat treatment and blade tempering, a fullered blade can be 20% to 35% lighter than a non-fullered blade without any sacrifice of strength or blade integrity. This effect lessens as the blade is reduced in length
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Hausa People
The Hausa (autonyms for singular: Bahaushe (m), Bahaushiya (f); plural: Hausawa and general: Hausa; exonyms: Ausa, Mgbakpa, Kado, Al-Takari, Fellata, Afnu and Abakwariga) are one of the largest ethnic groups in Africa. The Hausa are a diverse but culturally homogeneous people based primarily in the Sahelian and Sudanian Daura
Daura
area of northern Nigeria
Nigeria
and southeastern Niger, with significant numbers also living in parts of Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Chad, Togo, Ghana,[1] Sudan, Gabon
Gabon
and Senegal. The largest population of Hausa are concentrated in Nigeria
Nigeria
and Niger. Predominantly Hausa-speaking communities are scattered throughout West Africa and on the traditional Hajj
Hajj
route north and east traversing the Sahara, with an especially large population in and around the town of Agadez
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Fulani
The Fula people
Fula people
or Fulani or Fulany or Fulɓe (Fula: Fulɓe; French: Peul; Hausa: Fulani or Hilani; Portuguese: Fula; Wolof: Pël; Bambara: Fulaw), numbering between 20 and 25 million people in total,[10] are one of the largest ethnic groups in the Sahel
Sahel
and West Africa, widely dispersed across the region.[11] The Fula people
Fula people
are traditionally believed to have roots stemming from North Africa
North Africa
and the Middle East, who later intermingled with local West African ethnic groups
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Estoc
French estoc or English tuck is a type of sword in use from the 14th to 17th centuries.[1] It is characterized as having a cruciform hilt with a grip for two-handed use and a straight, edgeless, but sharply pointed blade of around 0.91 metres (36 in) to 1.32 metres (52 in) in length.Contents1 Description 2 History2.1 Hunting3 Bullfighting 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] The estoc was a variation of the longsword designed for fighting against mail or plate armour.[2] It was long, straight and stiff with no cutting edge, just a point. Examples from Poland are more than 1.57 metres (62 in) long, with a blade of 1.32 metres (52 in); however, others show a more manageable 1.17 metres (46 in), with a 0.91 metres (36 in) blade
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Zweihänder
The Zweihänder
Zweihänder
(German pronunciation: [t͡svaɪhɛndɐ] ( listen)) (German "two hander") also Doppelhänder ("double-hander") or Beidhänder ("both-hander")[1] is a large two-handed sword primarily in use during the early decades of the 16th century. Zweihänder
Zweihänder
swords developed from the longswords of the Late Middle Ages and became the hallmark weapon of the German Landsknechte from the time of Maximilian I (d. 1519) and during the Italian Wars
Italian Wars
of 1494–1559. The Goliath Fechtbuch
Goliath Fechtbuch
(1510) shows an intermediate form between longsword and Zweihänder. These swords represent the final stage in the trend of increasing size that started in the 14th century
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Spada Da Lato
The spada da lato or side-sword is the Italian term for the type of sword popular during the late 16th century, corresponding to the Spanish espada ropera. It is a continuation of the medieval arming sword and in turn the predecessor of the rapier of the Early Modern period. Its use was taught in the Dardi school
Dardi school
of Italian fencing, influential on 17th century rapier fencing. [1] They were ideal for handling the mix of armored and unarmored opponents of that time. A new technique of placing one's finger on the ricasso to improve the grip (a practice that would continue in the rapier) led to the production of hilts with a guard for the finger. This sword design eventually led to the development of the civilian rapier, but it was not replaced by it, and the side-sword continued to be used during the rapier's lifetime
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