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Tafsir
Tafsir
Tafsir
(Arabic: تفسير‎, translit. Tafsīr, lit. 'interpretation') is the Arabic word for exegesis, usually of the Qur'an. An author of tafsir is a mufassir (Arabic: مُفسّر‎; plural: Arabic: مفسّرون‎, translit. mufassirūn). A Qur'anic
Qur'anic
tafsir attempts at providing elucidation, explanation, interpretation, or commentary for clear understanding and conviction of God's will.[1] Principally, tafsir deals with the issues of linguistics, jurisprudence, and theology. In terms of perspective and approach, tafsir can be broadly divided into two categories, namely tafsir bi-al-ma'thur (lit. received tafsir) which is transmitted from the early days of Islam
Islam
through the prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
and his companions, and tafsir bi-al-ra'y (lit
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Classical Arabic
Classical Arabic
Arabic
is the form of the Arabic language
Arabic language
used in Umayyad and Abbasid
Abbasid
literary texts from the 7th century AD to the 9th century AD. The orthography of the Qurʾān was not developed for the standardized form of Classical Arabic; rather, it shows the attempt on the part of writers to record an archaic form of Old Higazi. Modern Standard Arabic
Modern Standard Arabic
(MSA) is its direct descendant used today throughout the Arab world
Arab world
in writing and in formal speaking, for example, prepared speeches, some radio broadcasts, and non-entertainment content;[1] it is also used in modernized versions of the Quran
Quran
and revised editions of poetries and novels from Umayyad and Abbasid
Abbasid
times (7th to 9th centuries)
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Quranism
Quranism (Arabic: القرآنية‎; al-Qur'āniyya) describes any form of Islam
Islam
that accepts the Quran
Quran
as revelation but rejects the religious authority, and/or authenticity of, the Hadith
Hadith
collections. Quranists follow the Quran
Quran
alone; they believe that its message is clear and complete, and that it can therefore be fully understood without referencing the Hadith
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Sana'a Manuscript
The Sana'a
Sana'a
palimpsest, sometimes referred to as Ṣanʿā’ 1, or as DAM 01-27.1 (with reference to the catalog number for the major collection of its folios) is one of the oldest Quranic manuscripts in existence.[1] Part of a sizable cache of Quranic and non-Quranic fragments discovered in Yemen
Yemen
during a 1972 restoration of the Great Mosque of Sana'a, the manuscript was identified as a palimpsest Quran in 1981; as it is written on parchment and comprises two layers of text. The upper text largely conforms to the standard 'Uthmanic' Quran in text and in the standard order of suras; whereas the lower text contains many variations from the standard text, and the sequence of its suras corresponds to no known quranic order
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Samarkand Kufic Quran
The Samarkand
Samarkand
Kufic
Kufic
Quran
Quran
(also known as the Uthman Quran, Samarkand codex, Samarkand
Samarkand
manuscript and Tashkent
Tashkent
Quran) is an 8th or 9th century manuscript Quran
Quran
written in the territory of modern Iraq
Iraq
in the Kufic
Kufic
script
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Ahmadiyya Translations Of The Quran
Translations
Translations
is a three-act play by Irish playwright Brian Friel, written in 1980. It is set in Baile Beag (Ballybeg), a Donegal village in 19th century agricultural Ireland. Friel has said that Translations is "a play about language and only about language", but it deals with a wide range of issues, stretching from language and communication to Irish history and cultural imperialism. Friel responds strongly to both political and language questions in the modern-day Republic of Ireland
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Literal Translation
Literal translation, direct translation, or word-for-word translation is the rendering of text from one language to another one word at a time (Latin: "verbum pro verbo") with or without conveying the sense of the original whole. In translation studies, "literal translation" denotes technical translation of scientific, technical, technological or legal texts.[1] In translation theory, another term for "literal translation" is "metaphrase"; and for phrasal ("sense") translation — "paraphrase." When considered a bad practice of conveying word by word (lexeme to lexeme, or morpheme to lexeme) translation of non-technical type literal translations has the meaning of mistranslating idioms,[2] for example, or in the context of translating an analytic language to a synthetic language, it renders even the grammar unintelligible. The concept of literal translation may be viewed as an oxymoron (contradiction in terms), given that literal denotes something existing without interpretation, where
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Romanization Of Arabic
The romanization of Arabic
Arabic
writes written and spoken Arabic
Arabic
in the Latin script
Latin script
in one of various systematic ways. Romanized Arabic
Arabic
is used for a number of different purposes, among them transcription of names and titles, cataloging Arabic language
Arabic language
works, language education when used in lieu of or alongside the Arabic
Arabic
script, and representation of the language in scientific publications by linguists
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Arabic Language
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[4] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east to the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic
Arabic
is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic) [5]. The modern written language (Modern Standard Arabic) is derived from Classical Arabic
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Book
A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it. The book's most common modern form is that of a codex volume consisting of rectangular paper pages bound on one side, with a heavier cover and spine, so that it can fan open for reading. Books have taken other forms, such as scrolls, leaves on a string, or strips tied together; and the pages have been of parchment, vellum, papyrus, bamboo slips, palm leaves, silk, wood, and other materials.[1] The contents of books are also called books, as are other compositions of that length. For instance, Aristotle's Physics, the constituent sections of the Bible, and even the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Book of the Dead
are called books independently of their physical form. Conversely, some long literary compositions are divided into books of varying sizes, which typically do not correspond to physically bound units
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Topkapi Manuscript
The Topkapi manuscript
Topkapi manuscript
is an early manuscript of the Quran
Quran
dated to the late 1st century / early 2nd century AH (i.e. early to mid 8th century AD)[citation needed] This manuscript is kept in the Topkapi Palace
Topkapi Palace
Museum, Istanbul, Turkey. It is attributed to Uthman Ibn Affan
Uthman Ibn Affan
(d. 656) Similar illuminations can be found in the Dome of the Rock
Dome of the Rock
in Jerusalem, the Umayyad Mosque
Umayyad Mosque
in Damascus and other Umayyad monuments. The size of this manuscript is 41 cm x 46 cm. It contains more than 99% of the text of the Qur'an
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Surah
A Surah
Surah
(/ˈsʊərə/;[1] also spelled Sura; Arabic: سورة‎ sūrah, plural سور suwar) is the term for a chapter of the Quran. There are 114 Surahs in the Quran, each divided into verses.[2] The chapters or suras are of unequal length; the shortest chapter (Al-Kawthar) has only three ayat (verses) while the longest (Al-Baqara) contains 286 verses.[3] Of the 114 chapters in the Quran, 87 are classified as Meccan, while 27 are Medinan [4]. This classification is only approximate in regard to location of revelation; any chapter revealed after migration of Muhammad
Muhammad
to Medina (Hijrah) is termed Medinan and any revealed before that event is termed Meccan
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Quranic Infallibility
Quranic infallibility is a doctrine central to the Muslim
Muslim
faith that the Quran
Quran
is the infallible and inerrant word of God as revealed to Muhammad
Muhammad
by the archangel Gabriel fourteen hundred years ago.[1][2] References[edit]^ Braswell, George W. (2000). What You Need to Know about Islam & Muslims. B&H Publishing Group. ISBN 9780805418293.  ^ Anwar, Syed Shakeel Ahmed (2007). The Holy Quran
Quran
is Infallible: A Critique of the Book
Book
"Is the Qur'an Infallible?" by 'Abdullah 'Abdal-Fadi, a Minister of Christ. Telugu Islamic Publications Trust. ISBN 9788188241736. This article related to the Quran
Quran
is a stub
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Hadith Of The Quran And Sunnah
Sunnah
Sunnah
is a saying attributed to the Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
(a hadith), namely "I have left among you two matters by holding fast to which, you shall never be misguided: the Book
Book
of God and my Sunna."[1][2] It is an often quoted saying regarding the sources of Islam. The authenticity of this hadith is rejected by many Shi'a
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Tarteel
Tarteel (Arabic: ترتيل‎) is the Arabic word for hymnody, the term is commonly translated in reference to the Qur'an
Qur'an
as "recitation, "in proper order" and "with no haste." This word is used in chapter 73 verse 4 of the Qur'an:"and recite the Qur'an
Qur'an
in slow measured rhythmic tones."The Arabic word translated as "slow, measured rhythmic tones" is tarteel. It is also the term used to define the rules explaining proper recitation of the Qur'an
Qur'an
in the manner that Gabriel
Gabriel
revealed it to Muhammad. While reciting one has to keep in mind the fasl (division) and wasl (joining) of words and sentences
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Qira'at
In Islam, Qira'at, which means literally the readings, terminologically means the method of recitation. Traditionally, there are 10 recognised schools of qira'at, and each one derives its name from a famous reader of Quran
Quran
recitation. Each Qira'at
Qira'at
is then transmitted via a riwaya (transmission) named after its primary narrator. Each of the riwayas is the whole of the Qur'an as recited by a master in all the variants which are transmitted from him. It is a corpus of recitation. The forms of each recitation are referred to by the notable students of the master who recited them. So we will find the turuq (transmission lines) of so-and-so, the student of the master. Then under the Turuq, there are also the wujuh. We find the wajh of so-and-so from the tariq of so-and-so
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