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Tachrichim
Tachrichim (Hebrew: תכריכים) are traditional simple white burial furnishings, usually made from 100% pure linen, in which the bodies of deceased Jews are dressed by the Chevra Kadisha, or other burial group, for interment after undergoing a taharah (ritual purification). In Hebrew, tachrichim means to "enwrap" or "bind." It comes from the Biblical verse (Esther 8:15) "And Mordechai
Mordechai
left the king's presence in royal ap
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Hebrew
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Linen
Linen
Linen
/ˈlɪnɪn/ is a textile made from the fibers of the flax plant. Linen
Linen
is laborious to manufacture, but the fiber is very absorbent and garments made of linen are valued for their exceptional coolness and freshness in hot weather. Many products are made of linen: aprons, bags, towels (swimming, bath, beach, body and wash towels), napkins, bed linens, tablecloths, runners, chair covers, and men's and women's wear. The word linen is of West Germanic origin and cognate to the Latin name for the flax plant, linum, and the earlier Greek λινόν (linón). This word history has given rise to a number of other terms in English, most notably line, from the use of a linen (flax) thread to determine a straight line.[1] Textiles in a linen weave texture, even when made of cotton, hemp and other non-flax fibers, are also loosely referred to as "linen"
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Israel
Coordinates: 31°N 35°E / 31°N 35°E / 31; 35State of Israelמְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל (Hebrew) دَوْلَة إِسْرَائِيل (Arabic)FlagEmblemAnthem: "Hatikvah" (Hebrew for "The Hope")(pre-) 1967 border (Green Line)Capital and largest city Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(limited recognition)[fn 1] 31°47′N 35°13′E / 31.783°N 35.217°E / 31.783; 35.217Official languagesHebrew ArabicEthnic groups (2017)74.7% Jewish
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Tzitzit
Tzitzit
Tzitzit
[tsiˈtsit] (Hebrew: ציצית‬, Modern tsitsit, Tiberian sˤisˤiṯ; plural tsitsiyot) are specially knotted ritual fringes, or tassels, worn in antiquity by Israelites
Israelites
and today by observant Jews
Jews
and Samaritans. Tzitzit
Tzitzit
are attached to the four corners of the tallit (prayer shawl) and tallit katan (everyday undergarment). Other pronunciations include Biblical and Middle Eastern (i. e., Mizrachi): ṣiṣit (pl. Ṣiṣiyot), Spanish and Mediterranean (i. e., Sephardic): tzitzit; European and Yiddish
Yiddish
(i. e., Ashkenazi): tzitzis; Yemenite (i
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Tallit
A tallit (Hebrew: טַלִּית‬ [taˈlit] talit[1] in Modern Hebrew; tālēt in Sephardic Hebrew and Ladino; tallis[2] in Ashkenazic Hebrew and Yiddish) (pl. tallitot [taliˈtot], talleisim,[3] tallism[4] in Ashkenazic Hebrew and Yiddish; ṭālēth/ṭelāyōth in Tiberian Hebrew) is a fringed garment traditionally worn by religious Jews. The tallit has special twined and knotted fringes known as tzitzit attached to its four corners. The cloth part is known as the "beged" (lit. garment) and is usually made from wool or cotton, although silk is sometimes used for a tallit gadol. The term is, to an extent, ambiguous
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Honorarium
An honorarium is an ex gratia payment (i.e., a payment made without the giver recognizing himself as having any liability or legal obligation made to a person for his or her services in a volunteer capacity or for services for which fees are not traditionally required). It is a common remuneration practice in schools or sports clubs, for teachers and coaches.[1][2][3] Another example includes the payment to guest speakers at a conference meeting to cover their travel, accommodation, or preparation time
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Chuppah
A chuppah (Hebrew: חוּפָּה‎, pl. חוּפּוֹת, chuppot, literally, "canopy" or "covering"), also huppah, chipe, chupah, or chuppa, is a canopy under which a Jewish couple stand during their wedding ceremony. It consists of a cloth or sheet, sometimes a tallit, stretched or supported over four poles, or sometimes manually held up by attendants to the ceremony. A chuppah symbolizes the home that the couple will build together. In a more general sense, chupah refers to the method by which nesuin, the second stage of a Jewish marriage, is accomplished
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Passover Seder
The Passover
Passover
Seder /ˈseɪdər/ (Hebrew: סֵדֶר‬ [ˈsedeʁ] 'order, arrangement'; Yiddish: סדר‎ seyder) is a Jewish ritual feast that marks the beginning of the Jewish holiday
Jewish holiday
of Passover. It is conducted throughout the world on the evening of the 15th day of Nisan
Nisan
in the Hebrew calendar
Hebrew calendar
(with a calendar day reckoned to start at sunset). The day falls in late March or in April of the Gregorian calendar and the Passover
Passover
lasts for 7 days in Israel
Israel
and 8 days outside Israel. Jews
Jews
generally observe one or two seders: in Israel, one seder is observed on the first night of Passover; many Diaspora communities hold a seder also on the second night
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Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur (/jɔːm, joʊm, jɒm ˈkɪpər, kɪˈpʊər/;[1] Hebrew: יוֹם כִּיפּוּר‬, IPA: [ˈjom kiˈpuʁ], or יום הכיפורים‬), also known as the Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the year in Judaism.[2] Its central themes are atonement and repentance
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Kohen
Four gifts given in Jerusalem 11. Firstborn animal · 12. Firstfruits 13. Burnt offering (Judaism) · 14. Parts of the thank offering and Nazirite's offering Ten gifts given (even) outside of Jerusalem 15. Heave offering 16. Heave offering of the Levite's tithe 17. Dough offering 18. First shearing of the sheep 19. Shoulder, cheeks and maw 20. Coins for redemption of the first born son · 21. Redemption of a donkey  · 22. Dedication of property to a priest  · 23. Field not redeemed in a Jubilee year · 24
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Muslin
Muslin
Muslin
(/ˈmʌzlɪn/ or /ˈmjuːslɪn/[citation needed]), also mousseline, is a cotton fabric of plain weave.[1][2] It is made in a wide range of weights from delicate sheers to coarse sheeting.[2][3] They were imported into Europe from India in the 17th century and were later manufactured in Scotland and England
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Ostentation
Conspicuous consumption
Conspicuous consumption
is the spending of money on and the acquiring of luxury goods and services to publicly display economic power—of the income or of the accumulated wealth of the buyer
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Decorum
Decorum
Decorum
(from the Latin: "right, proper") was a principle of classical rhetoric, poetry and theatrical theory that was about the fitness or otherwise of a style to a theatrical subject. The concept of decorum is also applied to prescribed limits of appropriate social behavior within set situations.Contents1 In rhetoric and poetry 2 In theatre 3 Social decorum 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksIn rhetoric and poetry[edit] In classical rhetoric and poetic theory, decorum designates the appropriateness of style to subject. Both Aristotle
Aristotle
(in, for example, his Poetics) and Horace
Horace
(in his Ars Poetica) discussed the importance of appropriate style in epic, tragedy, comedy, etc
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Rabban Gamliel
Gamaliel
Gamaliel
the Elder (/ɡəˈmeɪliəl, -ˈmɑː-, ˌɡæməˈliːəl/;[1] also spelled Gamliel; Hebrew: רבן גמליאל הזקן; Greek: Γαμαλιὴλ ὁ Πρεσβύτερος) or Rabban Gamaliel
Gamaliel
I, was a leading authority in the Sanhedrin
Sanhedrin
in the early 1st century AD
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