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TTIP
The Transatlantic Trade and Investment
Investment
Partnership (TTIP) is a proposed trade agreement between the European Union
European Union
and the United States, with the aim of promoting trade and multilateral economic growth
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Non-governmental Organization
Non-governmental organizations, nongovernmental[1] organizations, or nongovernment organizations,[2][3] commonly referred to as NGOs,[4] are usually non-profit and sometimes international organizations[5] independent of governments and international governmental organizations (though often funded by governments)[6] that are active in humanitarian, educational, health care, public policy, social, human rights, environmental, and other areas to effect changes according to their objectives.[7][8][9][10] They are thus a subgroup of all organizations founded by citizens, which include clubs and other associations that provide services, benefits, and premises only to members. Sometimes the term is used as a synonym of "civil society organization" to refer to any association founded by citizens,[11] but this is not how the term is normally used in the media or everyday language, as recorded by major dictionaries
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Max Otte
Max Otte (full name Matthias Otte born 7 October 1964 in Plettenberg, North Rhine-Westphalia) is a German economist and independent investment fund manager. He is a professor for general and international business administration at the University of Applied Sciences Worms and head of the Cologne-based IFVE Institut für Vermögensentwicklung GmbH (IFVE: a privately owned institute for asset management), which he founded in 2003.Contents1 Career 2 Books2.1 A Rising Middle Power? German Foreign Policy in Transformation, 1988–1998 2.2 Investieren statt Sparen (investing rather than saving) 2.3 Der Crash kommt
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Charitable Organization
A charitable organization or charity is a non-profit organization (NPO) whose primary objectives are philanthropy and social well-being (e.g. charitable, educational, religious, or other activities serving the public interest or common good). The legal definition of a charitable organisation (and of charity) varies between countries and in some instances regions of the country. The regulation, the tax treatment, and the way in which charity law affects charitable organizations also vary. Financial figures (e.g. tax refund, revenue from fundraising, revenue from sale of goods and services or revenue from investment) are important indicators to assess the financial sustainability of a charity, especially to charity evaluators. This information can impact a charity's reputation with donors and societies, and thus the charity's financial gains. Charitable organisations often depend partly on donations from businesses
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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Environmentalist
An environmentalist is a supporter of the goals of the environmental movement, "a political and ethical movement that seeks to improve and protect the quality of the natural environment through changes to environmentally harmful human activities".[1] An environmentalist is engaged in or believes in the philosophy of environmentalism. Environmentalists are sometimes referred to using informal or derogatory terms such as "greenie" and "tree-hugger".[2]Contents1 Notable environmentalists 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksNotable environmentalists[edit]Sir David Attenborough
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The Independent
The Independent
The Independent
is a British online newspaper.[2] Established in 1986 as an independent national morning newspaper published in London, it was controlled by Tony O'Reilly's Independent News & Media from 1997 until it was sold to Russian oligarch
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Big Business
Big businesses or large businesses are businesses involving in large-scale corporate-controlled financial or business activities. Large businesses can be seen as megacorporations/conglomerates or multinational corporations. As a term, it describes activities that run from "huge transactions" to the more general "doing big things". The concept first rose in a symbolic sense after 1880 in connection with the combination movement that began in American business at that time.[citation needed] United States corporations that fall into the category of "big business" as of 2015[update] include ExxonMobil, Walmart, Google, Microsoft, Apple, General Electric, General Motors, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs
Goldman Sachs
and JPMorgan Chase
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Food Safety
Food safety
Food safety
is a scientific discipline describing handling, preparation, and storage of food in ways that prevent food-borne illness. The occurrence of two or more cases of a similar illnesses resulting from the ingestion of a common food is known as a Food-borne disease outbreak. [1]This includes a number of routines that should be followed to avoid potential health hazards. In this way food safety often overlaps with food defense to prevent harm to consumers. The tracks within this line of thought are safety between industry and the market and then between the market and the consumer. In considering industry to market practices, food safety considerations include the origins of food including the practices relating to food labeling, food hygiene, food additives and pesticide residues, as well as policies on biotechnology and food and guidelines for the management of governmental import and export inspection and certification systems for foods
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Environmental Law
Environmental law, also known as environmental and natural resources law, is a collective term describing the network of treaties, statutes, regulations, common and customary laws addressing the effects of human activity on the natural environment. The core environmental law regimes address environmental pollution. A related but distinct set of regulatory regimes, now strongly influenced by environmental legal principles, focus on the management of specific natural resources, such as forests, minerals, or fisheries
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Bank Regulation
Bank
Bank
regulation is a form of government regulation which subjects banks to certain requirements, restrictions and guidelines, designed to create market transparency between banking institutions and the individuals and corporations with whom they conduct business, among other things. Given the interconnectedness of the banking industry and the reliance that the national (and global) economy hold on banks, it is important for regulatory agencies to maintain control over the standardized practices of these institutions. Supporters of such regulation often base their arguments on the "too big to fail" notion. This holds that many financial institutions (particularly investment banks with a commercial arm) hold too much control over the economy to fail without enormous consequences. This is the premise for government bailouts, in which government financial assistance is provided to banks or other financial institutions who appear to be on the brink of collapse
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Cold War
The Cold War
Cold War
was a state of geopolitical tension after World War II between powers in the Eastern Bloc
Eastern Bloc
(the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and its satellite states) and powers in the Western Bloc
Western Bloc
(the United States, its NATO allies and others). Historians do not fully agree on the dates, but a common timeframe is the period between 1947, the year the Truman Doctrine, a U.S. foreign policy pledging to aid nations threatened by Soviet expansionism, was announced, and either 1989, when communism fell in Eastern Europe, or 1991, when the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
collapsed
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Center For Economic And Policy Research
The Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) is an economic policy think-tank, co-founded by economists Dean Baker and Mark Weisbrot, and is based in Washington, D.C.[2]Contents1 History 2 Policy positions2.1 United States2.1.1 Affordable Care Act 2.1.2 Employment 2.1.3 Minimum wage 2.1.4 Taxes2.2 Haiti 2.3 Latin America3 Personnel 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR), founded in 1999, is a think tank which produces economic research on topics that affect people's lives to contribute to the public debate (social security, healthcare, the national budget), and internationally (global economy, International Monetary Fund, and Latin America policy).[3] Policy positions[edit] CEPR has been described as both progressive[4] and left-leaning.[5][6][7] CEPR is based in Washington, DC. United States[edit] Affordable Care Act[edit] CEPR supports the Affordable Care Act stating that it
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European Social Model
The European social model is a common vision many European states have for a society that combines economic growth with high living standards and good working conditions. Historian Tony Judt has argued that the European social model "binds Europe together" in contrast to the 'American way of life'.[1] European states do not all use a single social model, but welfare states in Europe do share several broad characteristics. These generally include a commitment to full employment, social protections for all citizens, social inclusion, and democracy. Examples common among European countries include universal health care, free higher education, strong labor protections and regulations, and generous welfare programs in areas such as unemployment insurance, retirement pensions, and public housing. The Treaty of the European Community set out several social objectives: promotion of employment, improved living and working conditions ..
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Direct Democracy
Direct democracy
Direct democracy
or pure democracy is a form of democracy in which people decide on policy initiatives directly. This differs from the majority of most currently established democracies, which are representative democracies.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Examples3.1 Ancient Athens 3.2 Switzerland 3.3 Paris Commune 3.4 United States 3.5 Rojava 3.6 Occupy Wall Street4 Democratic reform trilemma 5 Electronic direct democracy 6 Relation to other movements 7 In schools 8 Contemporary movements 9 See also 10 Notes and references 11 Bibliography 12 Further reading 13 External links13.1 MultimediaOverview[edit] In a representative democracy, people vote for representatives who then enact policy initiatives.[1] In direct democracy, people decide on policies without any intermediary
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Protectionism
Protectionism
Protectionism
is the economic policy of restricting imports from other countries through methods such as tariffs on imported goods, import quotas, and a variety of other government regulations. Proponents claim that protectionist policies shield the producers, businesses, and workers of the import-competing sector in the country from foreign competitors
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