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System Design
Systems design is the process of defining the architecture, modules, interfaces, and data for a system to satisfy specified requirements. Systems design could be seen as the application of systems theory to product development. There is some overlap with the disciplines of systems analysis, systems architecture and systems engineering.[1][2] If the broader topic of product development "blends the perspective of marketing, design, and manufacturing into a single approach to product development,"[3] then design is the act of taking the marketing information and creating the design of the product to be manufactured
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SCSD (School Construction Systems Development ) Project
From 1961-1967, in the U.S., the School Construction Systems Development (SCSD) project created an innovative, flexible, and prefabricated architectural building system that ignited an international interest in systems-based architecture.[1] The project emerged in response to the post-WWII baby boom, the mainstreaming of progressive education,[2] the industrialization of building materials, and a nationwide search to build schools faster and cheaper. In 1961 Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York proposed the use of stock plans (the same architectural plans on different sites). In response, the Architectural Forum and the Ford Foundation's Educational Facilities Laboratories (EFL) sponsored a conference of leading school administrators, architects, manufacturing executives, and engineers to devise alternative solutions
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Arcadia (engineering)
ARCADIA (Architecture Analysis & Design Integrated Approach) is a system and software architecture engineering method, based on architecture-centric and model-driven engineering activities. In the development cycle of a system, former practices focused more on the definition of requirements, their allocation to each component of the system component and associated traceability. Current approaches rather focus on functional analysis, system design, justification of architectural choices and verification steps. In addition, the design takes into account not only the functional point of view, but also other points of view, which affect the definition and breakdown of the system. For example, constraints relating to system integration, product line management, safety, performance and feasibility
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Embedded System

An embedded system is a computer system—a combination of a computer processor, computer memory, and input/output peripheral devices—that has a dedicated function within a larger mechanical or electrical system.[1][2] It is embedded as part of a complete device often including electrical or electronic hardware and mechanical parts. Because an embedded system typically controls physical operations of the machine that it is embedded within, it often has real-time computing constraints. Embedded systems control many devices in common use today.[3] Ninety-eight percent of all microprocessors manufactured are used in embedded systems.[4] Modern embedded systems are often based on microcontrollers (i.e
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Modular Design
Modular design, or modularity in design, is a design theory and practice that subdivides a system into smaller parts called modules (such as modular process skids), which can be independently created, modified, replaced or exchanged between different systems. A modular design can be characterized by functional partitioning into discrete scalable and reusable modules, rigorous use of well-defined modular interfaces, and making use of industry standards for interfaces. In this context modularity is at the component level, and has a single dimension, component slottability. A modular system with this limited modularity is generally known as a platform system that uses modular components. Examples are car platforms or the USB port in computer engineering platforms. In design theory this is distinct from a modular system which has higher dimensional modularity and degrees of freedom
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Morphological Analysis (problem-solving)
Morphological analysis or general morphological analysis is a method for exploring possible solutions to a multi-dimensional, non-quantified complex problem. It was developed by Fritz Zwicky.[1] General morphology was developed by Fritz Zwicky, the Bulgarian-born, Swiss-national astrophysicist based at the California Institute of Technology. Among others, Zwicky applied morphological analysis (MA) to astronomical studies and jet and rocket propulsion systems. As a problem-structuring and problem-solving technique, MA was designed for multi-dimensional, non-quantifiable problems where causal modelling and simulation do not function well, or at all
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