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Sylvana Foa
Sylvana Foa
Sylvana Foa
(born January 31, 1945, Buffalo, New York) is a former foreign correspondent and public affairs specialist who shattered glass ceilings within the media and the United Nations. She was the first woman to serve as foreign editor of a major international news organization, the first woman news director of an American television network and the first woman to serve as Spokesman for the Secretary General of the United Nations.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 UN Spokesman 2.2 Journalism
Journalism
career 2.3 Cambodia Expulsion 2.4 Foreign Editor 2.5 News Director & Vice President For News3 UN Refugee Work 4 Awards 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Foa was born in Buffalo, New York. Her family moved to Troy, New York when she was seven. She graduated from Barnard College of Columbia University in 1967
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Buffalo, New York
Buffalo is the second largest city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York and the largest city in Western New York. As of 2018[update], the population was 256,304. The city is the county seat of Erie County and a major gateway for commerce and travel across the Canada–United States border, forming part of the bi-national Buffalo Niagara Region. The Buffalo area was inhabited before the 17th century by the Native American Iroquois
Iroquois
tribe and later by French colonizers. The city grew significantly in the 19th and 20th centuries as a result of immigration, the construction of the Erie Canal
Erie Canal
and rail transportation, and its close proximity to Lake Erie
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Elizabeth Becker
Elizabeth Becker
Elizabeth Becker
is an award-winning author and journalist who covered national and international affairs as a New York Times correspondent and was a member of the staff that won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. She was the Senior Foreign Editor of National Public Radio where she received two DuPont-Columbia Awards as executive producer for reporting of South Africa’s first democratic elections and the Rwanda genocide. She began her career as a war correspondent for The Washington Post
The Washington Post
covering Cambodia. She is the author of When the War Was Over, a modern history of Cambodia
Cambodia
and the Khmer Rouge, for which she won a Robert F
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Jon Swain
Jon (John) Anketell Brewer Swain is a British journalist and writer. Swain's book River of Time: A Memoir of Vietnam chronicles his experiences from 1970 to 1975 during the war in Indochina, including the fall of Cambodia.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 References 4 External linksEarly life[edit] Swain was born in London
London
in 1948 and is of English, Scots, Irish, French, and Spanish descent. After an unhappy education at the independent Blundell's School, from which he was expelled, he ran away to join the French Foreign Legion. Career[edit] For many years, Swain was The Sunday Times' correspondent in Paris. During this time he had many famous scoops, including uncovering the financial support extended by Libya's Colonel Gaddafi to Arthur Scargill's National Union of Mineworkers. He also reported for the newspaper from East Timor
East Timor
in 1999, at the time of its vote for independence
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Matthew V. Storin
Matthew V. Storin (born 1942, Massachusetts) was Editor of the Boston Globe from 1992-2001. He was succeeded by Martin Baron.Contents1 Biography1.1 Career 1.2 Marriage and children 1.3 Other2 ReferencesBiography[edit] Career[edit] Storin began his journalism career at his hometown newspaper, the Daily News of Springfield, Mass. In 1965, he joined the Griffin-Larrabee News Bureau in Washington D.C., where he was a political reporter until he joined the Globe staff in 1969. Storin initially covered Congress and the White House for the Globe, and later served in a number of positions, including City editor
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Jonathan Schell
Jonathan Edward Schell (August 21, 1943 – March 25, 2014)[1][2] was an American author and visiting fellow at Yale University, whose work primarily dealt with campaigning against nuclear weapons.Contents1 Career 2 Personal 3 Reviews, response, and criticism 4 Selected publications 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksCareer[edit] His work appeared in The Nation, The New Yorker, and TomDispatch. The Fate of the Earth received the Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Times
Book Prize, among other awards, and was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the National Critics Award. In his words ; “Never has a nation unleashed so much violence with so little risk to itself
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Peter R. Kann
Peter R
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Ward Just
Ward S. Just (born September 5, 1935 in Michigan City, Indiana) is an American writer. He is the author of 17 novels and numerous short stories.Contents1 Biography 2 Works2.1 Novels 2.2 Story collections 2.3 Nonfiction 2.4 Plays 2.5 Anthologized in3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Just was born in Michigan City, Indiana, attended Lake Forest Academy, and subsequently graduated from Cranbrook School in 1953. He briefly attended Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. He started his career as a print journalist for the Waukegan (Illinois) News-Sun. He was also a correspondent for Newsweek
Newsweek
and The Washington Post
The Washington Post
from 1959 to 1969, after which he left journalism to write fiction. His influences include Henry James
Henry James
and Ernest Hemingway
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Al Gore
v t eAlbert Arnold Gore Jr. (born March 31, 1948) is an American politician and environmentalist who served as the 45th Vice President of the United States from 1993 to 2001. Gore was Bill Clinton's running mate in their successful campaign in 1992, and the pair was re-elected in 1996. Near the end of Clinton's second term, Gore was selected as the Democratic nominee for the 2000 presidential election but lost the election in a very close race after a Florida recount. After his term as vice-president ended in 2001, Gore remained prominent as an author and environmental activist, whose work in climate change activism earned him (jointly with the IPCC) the Nobel Peace Prize
Nobel Peace Prize
in 2007. Gore was an elected official for 24 years. He was a Representative from Tennessee
Tennessee
(1977–85) and from 1985 to 1993 served as one of the state's Senators
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Correspondent
A correspondent or on-the-scene reporter is usually a journalist or commentator for magazines, or more speaking, an agent who contributes reports to a newspaper, or radio or television news, or another type of company, from a remote, often distant, location. A foreign correspondent is stationed in a foreign country. The term correspondent refers to the original practice of filing news reports via postal letter. The largest networks of correspondents belong to ARD (Germany) and BBC
BBC
(UK).Contents1 Vs. reporter 2 Common types2.1 Capitol correspondent 2.2 Legal/justice correspondent 2.3 Red carpet
Red carpet
correspondent 2.4 Foreign correspondent2.4.1 War correspondent 2.4.2 Foreign bureau3 On-the-scene TV news 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksVs. reporter[edit] In Britain, the term 'correspondent' usually refers to someone with a specific specialist area, such as health correspondent
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James Fenton
James Martin Fenton FRSL
FRSL
FRSA
FRSA
(born 25 April 1949, Lincoln) is an English poet, journalist and literary critic.[1] He is a former Oxford Professor of Poetry.Contents1 Life and career1.1 Musical theatre influence2 Awards and honours 3 Books 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksLife and career[edit] Born in Lincoln, Fenton grew up in Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
and Staffordshire, the son of Canon John Fenton, a noted biblical scholar.[2] He was educated at the Durham Choristers School, Repton and Magdalen College, Oxford. He graduated with a B.A. in 1970.[3] Fenton acquired at school an enthusiasm for the work of W.H. Auden. At Oxford John Fuller, who happened to be writing A Reader's Guide to W.H. Auden at the time, further encouraged that enthusiasm
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Richard Dudman
Richard Beebe Dudman (May 3, 1918 – August 3, 2017) was an American journalist who spent 31 years with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
during which time he covered Fidel Castro's insurgency in Cuba, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, the Watergate scandal, the Iran-Contra
Iran-Contra
scandal, and wars and revolutions in Latin America, the Middle East, and the Far East. He was chief of the Washington bureau during the 1970s which landed him on the master list of Nixon political opponents.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Selected works 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Dudman was born in Centerville, Iowa. He majored in journalism and economics at Stanford University, where he wrote for the school paper, graduating in 1940. During World War II, he served in the merchant marines, dodging German submarines in the North Atlantic. He joined the U.S
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Richard Tregaskis
Richard William Tregaskis (November 28, 1916 – August 15, 1973) was an American journalist and author whose best-known work is Guadalcanal Diary (1943), an account of just the first several weeks (in August - September 1942) of the U.S. Marine Corps
U.S. Marine Corps
invasion of Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands
Solomon Islands
during World War II. This was actually a six-month-long campaign
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Pulitzer Prize
The Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
/ˈpʊlɪtsər/[1] is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of American (Hungarian-born) Joseph Pulitzer who had made his fortune as a newspaper publisher, and is administered by Columbia University
Columbia University
in New York City.[2] Prizes are awarded yearly in twenty-one categories. In twenty of the categories, each winner receives a certificate and a U.S
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Indira Gandhi
Indira Priyadarshini Gandhi (Hindustani: [ˈɪnːdɪrə ˈɡaːnd̪ʱi] ( listen); née Nehru; 19 November 1917 – 31 October 1984) was an Indian stateswoman and central figure of the Indian National Congress.[1] She was the first and, to date, the only female Prime Minister of India. Indira Gandhi
Indira Gandhi
belonged to the Nehru–Gandhi family
Nehru–Gandhi family
and was the daughter of Jawaharlal Nehru, the first Indian prime minister. Despite her surname Gandhi, she is not related to the family of Mahatma Gandhi. She served as Prime Minister from January 1966 to March 1977 and again from January 1980 until her assassination in October 1984, making her the second longest-serving Indian prime minister after her father. Gandhi served as her father's personal assistant and hostess during his tenure as Prime Minister between 1947 and 1964. She was elected Congress President in 1959
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