HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Sydney Camm
Sir Sydney Camm, CBE, FRAeS (5 August 1893 – 12 March 1966) was an English aeronautical engineer who contributed to many Hawker aircraft designs, from the biplanes of the 1920s to jet fighters. One particularly notable aircraft he designed is the Hawker Hurricane fighter.[1]Contents1 Early years 2 Aviation career2.1 Hurricane 2.2 Typhoon 2.3 Tempest 2.4 Sea Fury3 Postwar3.1 Harrier 3.2 Hunter4 Final years 5 Death 6 Personal life 7 Tributes 8 See also 9 References 10 External links10.1 Video clipsEarly years[edit] Sydney Camm
Sydney Camm
was born at 10 Alma Road in Windsor, Berkshire, the eldest child of the twelve children of Frederick Camm, a carpenter/joiner and Mary Smith.[2] The Camm family lived near Windsor & Eton Central railway station
[...More...]

"Sydney Camm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wing Root
The wing root is the part of the wing on a fixed-wing aircraft that is closest to the fuselage.[1] On a simple monoplane configuration, this is usually easy to identify. On parasol wing or multiple boom aircraft, the wing may not have a clear root area.[1] Wing roots usually bear the highest bending forces in flight and during landing, and they often have fairings (often named "wing fillets") to reduce interference drag between the wing and the fuselage.[citation needed] The opposite end of a wing from the wing root is the wing tip.[1] See also[edit]WingboxReferences[edit]^ a b c Peppler, I.L.: From The Ground Up, page 9. Aviation Publishers Co
[...More...]

"Wing Root" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

AVRO
Subsidiary of Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
1935 Merged into Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
Aircraft 1963Successor Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
AviationFounded 1910 – Brownsfield Mill, ManchesterDefunct 1963Headquarters Alexandra Park, Woodford, Stockport, United KingdomKey peopleA.V. Roe, Roy Chadwick, Roy Dobson, Harry Broadhurst Avro
Avro
was a British aircraft manufacturer. Its designs include the Avro 504, used as a trainer in the First World War, the Avro
Avro
Lancaster, one of the pre-eminent bombers of the Second World War, and the delta wing Avro
Avro
Vulcan, a stalwart of the Cold War. Avro
Avro
was founded in 1910 by Alliott Verdon Roe
Alliott Verdon Roe
at the Brownsfield Mill on Great Ancoats Street
Great Ancoats Street
in Manchester
[...More...]

"AVRO" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Suffer Fools Gladly
Suffer fools gladly is a well-known phrase in contemporary use, first coined by Saint Paul in his second letter to the Church at Corinth (chapter 11). The full verse of the original source of the idiom, 2 Corinthians 11:19 (KJV), reads "For ye suffer fools gladly, seeing ye yourselves are wise."[1][2] The New International Version
New International Version
states "You gladly put up with fools since you are so wise!"[3] In its current usage, the meaning of the negative, not to suffer fools gladly, has been stated by the Cambridge Idiom Dictionary, 2nd Ed
[...More...]

"Suffer Fools Gladly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

English Electric Lightning
The English Electric
English Electric
Lightning is a supersonic fighter aircraft of the Cold War
Cold War
era. It was designed, developed, and manufactured by English Electric, which was subsequently absorbed by the newly formed British Aircraft Corporation. It was then marketed as the BAC Lightning. The Lightning was the only all-British Mach 2 fighter aircraft. The Lightning was used by the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF) and the Royal Saudi Air Force (RSAF). Although it was the RAF's primary interceptor for more than two decades, it was never required to attack another aircraft. The Lightning is powered by two Rolls-Royce Avon
Rolls-Royce Avon
turbojet engines in a unique staggered stacked installation in the fuselage
[...More...]

"English Electric Lightning" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Leslie Appleton
Leslie Appleton (born 28 September 1947) is an Australian former cricketer. He played eight first-class matches for Tasmania between 1969 and 1974.[1] See also[edit]List of Tasmanian representative cricketersReferences[edit]^ "Leslie Appleton". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 13 March 2016. External links[edit]Leslie Appleton at ESPNcricinfoThis biographical article related to an Australian cricket person born in the 1940s is a stub
[...More...]

"Leslie Appleton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fairey Delta 2
The Fairey Delta 2
Fairey Delta 2
or FD2 (internal designation Type V within Fairey) was a British supersonic research aircraft produced by the Fairey Aviation Company in response to a specification from the Ministry of Supply for a specialised aircraft for conducting investigations into flight and control at transonic and supersonic speeds. Key features of the type include the adoption of a delta wing and a droop-nose. On 6 October 1954, the Delta 2 conducted its maiden flight, flown by Fairey test pilot Peter Twiss; a total of two aircraft would be produced. The Delta 2 was the final aircraft to be produced by Fairey as an independent manufacturer.[1] The Fairey Delta 2
Fairey Delta 2
is the first jet aircraft to exceed 1000 mph in level flight,[2] flying faster than the sun moves across the sky. On 10 March 1956, it set a new world speed record of 1,132 mph during a test flight
[...More...]

"Fairey Delta 2" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fairey Fireflash
Fireflash
Fireflash
was the United Kingdom's first air-to-air guided missile to see service with the Royal Air Force. It was briefly deployed during the 1950s. Constructed by Fairey Aviation, the missile utilised radar beam riding guidance.Contents1 Development 2 Description 3 Operators 4 Survivors 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksDevelopment[edit]A Supermarine Swift
Supermarine Swift
with two Fireflash
Fireflash
missiles (1956)Produced in response to a Ministry of Supply requirement for a guided air-to-air missile, the project began in 1949 under the name Blue Sky. It was initially developed under the designation Pink Hawk. Blue Sky itself was a de-rated version of the Red Hawk missile. About 300 missiles had been produced by 1955, but the Royal Air Force soon decided not to retain the type in its inventory
[...More...]

"Fairey Fireflash" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stuart Davies (engineer)
Stuart Duncan Davies CBE FEng
FEng
FRAeS
FRAeS
(5 December 1906 – 22 January 1995) was a British aerospace engineer who was in charge of the design of the Avro
Avro
Vulcan. He was also responsible for converting the unsuccessful two-engined Avro
Avro
Manchester into the four-engined Avro Lancaster.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Vauxhall 2.2 Vickers 2.3 Hawker 2.4 Avro 2.5 Later career3 Personal life 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] He was the son of William Davies and Alice Duncan
[...More...]

"Stuart Davies (engineer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Avro Vulcan
The Avro
Avro
Vulcan (later Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
Vulcan[2] from July 1963)[3] is a jet-powered tailless delta wing high-altitude strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A.V. Roe and Company (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers
V bombers
produced, the Vulcan was considered the most technically advanced and hence the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro
Avro
707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles. The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile
[...More...]

"Avro Vulcan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Technical Drawing
Technical drawing, drafting or drawing, is the act and discipline of composing drawings that visually communicate how something functions or is constructed. Technical drawing
Technical drawing
is essential for communicating ideas in industry and engineering. To make the drawings easier to understand, people use familiar symbols, perspectives, units of measurement, notation systems, visual styles, and page layout. Together, such conventions constitute a visual language and help to ensure that the drawing is unambiguous and relatively easy to understand. Many of the symbols and principles of technical drawing are codified in an international standard called ISO 128. The need for precise communication in the preparation of a functional document distinguishes technical drawing from the expressive drawing of the visual arts. Artistic drawings are subjectively interpreted; their meanings are multiply determined
[...More...]

"Technical Drawing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chief Project Engineer
The chief project engineer (CPE) is a member of the design organisation of an aeronautical company, required by the European Aviation Safety Agency
[...More...]

"Chief Project Engineer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fairey Aviation Company
The Fairey Aviation Company
Fairey Aviation Company
Limited was a British aircraft manufacturer of the first half of the 20th century based in Hayes in Middlesex and Heaton Chapel
Heaton Chapel
and RAF Ringway
RAF Ringway
in Lancashire. Notable for the design of a number of important military aircraft, including the Fairey III
Fairey III
family, the Swordfish, Firefly, and Gannet, it had a strong presence in the supply of naval aircraft, and also built bombers for the RAF. After World War II the company diversified into mechanical engineering and boat-building. The aircraft manufacturing arm was taken over by Westland Aircraft
Westland Aircraft
in 1960
[...More...]

"Fairey Aviation Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Biplane
A biplane is a fixed-wing aircraft with two main wings stacked one above the other. The first powered, controlled aeroplane to fly, the Wright Flyer, used a biplane wing arrangement, as did many aircraft in the early years of aviation. While a biplane wing structure has a structural advantage over a monoplane, it produces more drag than a similar unbraced or cantilever monoplane wing. Improved structural techniques, better materials and the quest for greater speed made the biplane configuration obsolete for most purposes by the late 1930s. Biplanes offer several advantages over conventional cantilever monoplane designs: they permit lighter wing structures, low wing loading and smaller span for a given wing area
[...More...]

"Biplane" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Monoplane
A monoplane is a fixed-wing aircraft with a single main wing plane, in contrast to a biplane or other multiplane, each of which has multiple planes. A monoplane has inherently the highest efficiency and lowest drag of any wing configuration and is the simplest to build
[...More...]

"Monoplane" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.