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Swiss Army Knife
The Swiss Army
Swiss Army
knife[1] is a pocketknife or multi-tool manufactured by Victorinox
Victorinox
AG (and up to 2005 also by Wenger
Wenger
SA). The term "Swiss Army knife" was coined by American soldiers after World War II
World War II
due to the difficulty they had in pronouncing "Offiziersmesser", the German name.[2] The Swiss Army
Swiss Army
knife generally has a main spearpoint blade, as well as various tools, such as screwdrivers, a can opener, and many others. These attachments are stowed inside the handle of the knife through a pivot point mechanism
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Manganese
Manganese
Manganese
is a chemical element with symbol Mn and atomic number 25. It is not found as a free element in nature; it is often found in minerals in combination with iron. Manganese
Manganese
is a metal with important industrial metal alloy uses, particularly in stainless steels. Historically, manganese is named for pyrolusite and other black minerals from the region of Magnesia in Greece, which also gave its name to magnesium and the iron ore magnetite. By the mid-18th century, Swedish-German chemist Carl Wilhelm Scheele
Carl Wilhelm Scheele
had used pyrolusite to produce chlorine. Scheele and others were aware that pyrolusite (now known to be manganese dioxide) contained a new element, but they were unable to isolate it
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Liner Lock
The Linerlock is a locking mechanism for folding pocket knives. A Linerlock is a folding knife with a side-spring lock that can be opened and closed with one hand without repositioning the knife in the hand. The lock is self-adjusting for wear. The modern Linerlock traces its lineage to the late 19th century, but in the 1980s the design was improved by American custom knifemaker Michael Walker.Contents1 History 2 Construction 3 Variations 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Linerlock knives have been around since the late 19th century
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Shield
A shield is a piece of personal armour held in the hand or mounted on the wrist or forearm. Shields are used to intercept specific attacks, whether from close-ranged weaponry or projectiles such as arrows, by means of active blocks, instead of providing passive protection. Shields vary greatly in size, ranging from large panels that protect the user's whole body to small models (such as the buckler) that were intended for hand-to-hand-combat use. Shields also vary a great deal in thickness; whereas some shields were made of relatively deep, absorbent, wooden planking to protect soldiers from the impact of spears and crossbow bolts, others were thinner and lighter and designed mainly for deflecting blade strikes
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Schwyz
The town of Schwyz
Schwyz
(German pronunciation: [ʃviːt͡s] ( listen); French: Schwytz; Italian: Svitto) is the capital of the canton of Schwyz
Schwyz
in Switzerland. The
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Canton Of Jura
The Republic and Canton of the Jura (French: République et canton du Jura), also known as the canton of Jura or canton Jura, is the newest (founded in 1979) of the 26 Swiss cantons, located in the northwestern part of Switzerland. The capital is Delémont
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Monroe, Connecticut
Monroe is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 19,479 at the 2010 census.[1] Like many of its neighbors, Monroe is largely considered a bedroom community of New York City
New York City
and Bridgeport
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Armasuisse
Armasuisse
Armasuisse
is a federal agency of the Swiss Confederation. It is the procurement organization for armaments of Switzerland
Switzerland
and is affiliated with the Federal Department of Defence, Civil Protection and Sport. Armasuisse
Armasuisse
employs around 750 people. The budget was 217 million Swiss francs in 2006. National Armaments Director is Martin Sonderegger. The Armasuisse
Armasuisse
group covers many skills as a provider with a broad field of activity. This ranges from the evaluation, procurement, maintenance and liquidation of materials and systems for the Comprehensive Real Estate Management in VBS to ensuring scientific and technical services
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Bundeswehr
The Bundeswehr
Bundeswehr
(German: [ˈbʊndəsˌveːɐ̯] ( listen), Federal Defence) is the unified armed forces of Germany
Germany
and their civil administration and procurement authorities. The States of Germany
Germany
are not allowed to maintain armed forces of their own, since the German Constitution states that matters of defense fall into the sole responsibility of the federal government.[4] The Bundeswehr
Bundeswehr
is divided into a military part (armed forces or Streitkräfte) and a civil part with the armed forces administration (Wehrverwaltung)
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DIP Switch
A DIP switch
DIP switch
is a manual electric switch that is packaged with others in a group in a standard dual in-line package (DIP). The term may refer to each individual switch, or to the unit as a whole. This type of switch is designed to be used on a printed circuit board along with other electronic components and is commonly used to customize the behavior of an electronic device for specific situations. DIP switches are an alternative to jumper blocks. Their main advantages are that they are quicker to change and there are no parts to lose. The DIP switch
DIP switch
with sliding levers was granted US Patent 4012608 in 1976.[1] It was applied for 1974 and was used in 1977 in an ATARI Flipper game.[2] Types[edit] There are many different kinds of DIP switches
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Piezoelectricity
Piezoelectricity
Piezoelectricity
is the electric charge that accumulates in certain solid materials (such as crystals, certain ceramics, and biological matter such as bone, DNA
DNA
and various proteins)[1] in response to applied mechanical stress. The word piezoelectricity means electricity resulting from pressure and latent heat
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Guinness World Records
Guinness
Guinness
World Records, known from its inception from 1819 until 2000 as The Guinness
Guinness
Book of Records and in previous United States
United States
editions as The Guinness
Guinness
Book of World Records, is a reference book published annually, listing world records both of human achievements and the extremes of the natural world. The brainchild of Sir Hugh Beaver, the book was co-founded by brothers Norris and Ross McWhirter in Fleet Street, London in August 1819. The book itself holds a world record, as the best-selling copyrighted book of all time. As of the 2019 edition, it is now in its 64th year of publication, published in 100 countries and 23 languages. The international franchise has extended beyond print to include television series and museums
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Rivet
A rivet is a permanent mechanical fastener. Before being installed, a rivet consists of a smooth cylindrical shaft with a head on one end. The end opposite to the head is called the tail. On installation, the rivet is placed in a punched or drilled hole, and the tail is upset, or bucked (i.e., deformed), so that it expands to about 1.5 times the original shaft diameter, holding the rivet in place. In other words, pounding creates a new "head" on the other end by smashing the "tail" material flatter, resulting in a rivet that is roughly a dumbbell shape. To distinguish between the two ends of the rivet, the original head is called the factory head and the deformed end is called the shop head or buck-tail. Because there is effectively a head on each end of an installed rivet, it can support tension loads (loads parallel to the axis of the shaft); however, it is much more capable of supporting shear loads (loads perpendicular to the axis of the shaft)
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Corkscrew
A corkscrew is a tool for drawing corks from wine bottles, beer bottles and other household bottles before the invention of screw caps and Crown corks. In its traditional form, a corkscrew simply consists of a pointed metallic helix (often called the "worm") attached to a handle, which the user screws into the cork and pulls to extract it. Corkscrews are necessary because corks themselves, being small and smooth, are difficult to grip and remove, particularly when inserted fully into an inflexible glass bottle
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Bushing (bearing)
A plain bearing (in railroading sometimes called a solid bearing or friction bearing[citation needed]) is the simplest type of bearing, comprising just a bearing surface and no rolling elements. Therefore, the journal (i.e., the part of the shaft in contact with the bearing) slides over the bearing surface. The simplest example of a plain bearing is a shaft rotating in a hole
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Brass
Brass
Brass
is a metallic alloy that is made of copper and zinc. The proportions of zinc and copper can vary to create different types of brass alloys with varying mechanical and electrical properties.[1] It is a substitutional alloy: atoms of the two constituents may replace each other within the same crystal structure. In contrast, bronze is an alloy of copper and tin.[2] Both bronze and brass may include small proportions of a range of other elements including arsenic, lead, phosphorus, aluminium, manganese, and silicon
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