HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Svyatogor
Svyatogor
Svyatogor
(Russian: Святого́р, IPA: [svʲɪtɐˈɡor]) is a Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
mythical bogatyr (knight/hero) from bylinas. His name is a derivation from the words "sacred mountain". Svyatogor's tale, Ilya Muromets
Ilya Muromets
and Svyatogor, is a part of the Ilya Muromets
Ilya Muromets
cycle. After becoming a bogatyr of knyaz Vladimir the Bright Sun (Владимир Красное Солнышко, Vladimir Krasnoye Solnyshko), Ilya rides off to challenge Svyatogor, despite being forewarned not to do so by pilgrims who had miraculously healed him. On the road, Ilya Muromets
Ilya Muromets
sees a giant asleep on a giant horse. Ilya strikes him three times with his mace, with the only result that the giant, still asleep, grabs and puts Ilya into his pocket
[...More...]

"Svyatogor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

First Person Shooter
First-person shooter
First-person shooter
(FPS) is a video game genre centered around gun and other weapon-based combat in a first-person perspective; that is, the player experiences the action through the eyes of the protagonist. The genre shares common traits with other shooter games, which in turn makes it fall under the heading action game. Since the genre's inception, advanced 3D and pseudo-3D graphics have challenged hardware development, and multiplayer gaming has been integral. The first-person shooter genre has been traced as far back as Maze War, development of which began in 1973, and 1974's Spasim. Later, and after more playful titles like MIDI Maze
MIDI Maze
in 1987, the genre coalesced into a more violent form with 1992's Wolfenstein 3D, which has been credited with creating the genre's basic archetype upon which subsequent titles were based
[...More...]

"First Person Shooter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Overwatch (video Game)
Overwatch is a team-based multiplayer first-person shooter video game developed and published by Blizzard Entertainment, which released on May 24, 2016 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Windows. Overwatch assigns players into two teams of six, with each player selecting from a roster of over 20 characters, known in-game as "heroes", each with a unique style of play, whose roles are divided into four general categories: Offense, Defense, Tank, and Support. Players on a team work together to secure and defend control points on a map or escort a payload across the map in a limited amount of time. Players gain cosmetic rewards that do not affect gameplay, such as character skins and victory poses, as they play the game. The game was initially launched with casual play, with a competitive ranked mode, various 'arcade' game modes, and a player-customizable server browser subsequently included following its release
[...More...]

"Overwatch (video Game)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

WGBH-TV
WGBH-TV, virtual channel 2 (UHF digital channel 19), is a PBS
PBS
member television station located in Boston, Massachusetts, United States. The station is owned by, and is the flagship property of, the WGBH Educational Foundation, which also owns fellow PBS
PBS
stations WGBX-TV (channel 44) in Boston
Boston
and WGBY-TV
WGBY-TV
(channel 57) in Springfield, Massachusetts, and public radio stations WGBH (89.7 FM) and WCRB (99.5 FM) in the Boston
Boston
area, and WCAI (90.1 FM) (and satellites WZAI and WNAN) in Cape Cod. WGBH is also one of the two flagship stations of PBS, along with WNET-TV (channel 13) in New York City
[...More...]

"WGBH-TV" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stop Motion
Stop motion
Stop motion
(hyphenated stop-motion when used as an adjective) is an animation technique that physically manipulates an object so that it appears to move on its own. The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a fast sequence. Dolls with movable joints or clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Stop motion
Stop motion
animation using plasticine is called clay animation or "clay-mation". Not all stop motion requires figures or models; many stop motion films can involve using humans, household appliances and other things for comedic effect. Stop motion can also use sequential drawing in a similar manner to traditional animation, such as a flip book
[...More...]

"Stop Motion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Czechs
Mostly Irreligion[13] Historically Christian Roman Catholic, Hussite, Lutheran and other Moravians, Slovaks, Silesians, Sorbs, Germans[14], Austrians[14], Bavarians, Poles
Poles
& other West SlavsThe Czechs
Czechs
(Czech: Češi, pronounced [ˈtʃɛʃɪ]; singular masculine: Čech [ˈtʃɛx], singular feminine: Češka [ˈtʃɛʃka]) or the Czech people (Český národ), are a West Slavic ethnic group and a nation native to the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
in Central Europe, who share a common ancestry, culture, history and are native speakers of the Czech language. Ethnic Czechs
Czechs
were called Bohemians in English until the early 20th century, referring to the medieval land of Bohemia
Bohemia
which in turn was adapted from late Iron Age
Iron Age
tribe of Celtic Boii
[...More...]

"Czechs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Andrei Ryabushkin
Andrei Petrovich Ryabushkin (Russian: Андре́й Петро́вич Ря́бушкин; 29 October [O.S. 17 October] 1861 – 10 May [O.S. 27 April] 1904) was a Russian painter. His major works were devoted to life of ordinary Russians of the 17th century.Contents1 Biography 2 More selected works 3 See also 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Sources5 External linksBiography[edit]The DeaconAndrey Petrovich Ryabushkin was born in the village Stanichnaya sloboda, Borisoglebskiy uezd, Tambov
Tambov
gubernia in 1861. His father and brother were icon painters, and he started to help them from his early childhood. At 14 years old he became an orphan. A student of Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture A. Kh. Preobrazhensky, who spent the summer in the village, happened to see the boy’s drawings and was greatly impressed by them
[...More...]

"Andrei Ryabushkin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Belarusians
Belarusians
Belarusians
(Belarusian: беларусы, biełarusy, or Byelorussians (from the Byelorussian SSR), are an East Slavic ethnic group who are native to modern-day Belarus
Belarus
and the immediate region. There are over 9.5 million people who proclaim Belarusian ethnicity worldwide, with the overwhelming majority residing either in Belarus or the adjacent countries where they are an autochthonous minority.Contents1 Location 2 Languages 3 History 4 Cuisine 5 See also 6 References6.1 Bibliography7 External linksLocation[edit] See also: Belarusian diasporaEthnic territory of Belarusians   According to Y. Karskiy (1903)   According to M. Dovnar-Zapol'skiy (1919)   Modern state boundaries Belarusians
Belarusians
are an East Slavic ethnic group who populate the majority of the Belarus
[...More...]

"Belarusians" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vladimir I Of Kiev
Vladimir the Great
Vladimir the Great
(also (Saint) Vladimir of Kiev; Old East Slavic: Володимѣръ Свѧтославичь, Volodiměrъ Svętoslavičь,[3] Old Norse Valdamarr gamli;[4] c. 958 – 15 July 1015, Berestove) was a prince of Novgorod, grand prince of Kiev, and ruler of Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
from 980 to 1015.[5][6] Vladimir's father was prince Sviatoslav of the Rurik dynasty.[7] After the death of his father in 972, Vladimir, who was then prince of Novgorod, was forced to flee to Scandinavia
Scandinavia
in 976 after his brother Yaropolk had murdered his other brother Oleg and conquered Rus'
[...More...]

"Vladimir I Of Kiev" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Knyaz
Knyaz
Knyaz
or knez is a historical Slavic title, used both as a royal and noble title in different times of history and different ancient Slavic lands. It is usually translated into English as prince, duke or count, depending on specific historical context and the potentially known Latin
Latin
equivalents of the title for each bearer of the name. In Latin, sources the title is usually translated as comes or princeps, but the word was originally derived from the Proto-Germanic
Proto-Germanic
kuningaz (king).[1] The female form transliterated from Bulgarian and Russian is knyaginya (княгиня), kniahynia (княгиня) in Ukrainian, kneginja in Slovene, Croatian and Serbian (Serbian Cyrillic: кнегиња). In Russian, the daughter of a knyaz is knyazhna (княжна), in Ukrainian is kniazivna (князівна)
[...More...]

"Knyaz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Burislav
Burislav, Burisleif, Burysław (died 1008) is the name of a mythical Wendish king from Scandinavian sagas who is said to rule over Wendland. He is said to be father of Gunhild, Astrid and Geira
[...More...]

"Burislav" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hero
A hero (masculine) or heroine (feminine) is a person or main character of a literary work who, in the face of danger, combats adversity through feats of ingenuity, bravery or strength, often sacrificing their own personal concerns for a greater good. The concept of the hero can be found in classical literature. It is the main or revered character in heroic epic poetry celebrated through ancient legends of a people, often striving for military conquest and living by a continually flawed personal honor code.[1] The definition of a hero has changed throughout time
[...More...]

"Hero" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Knight
A knight is a person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch or other political leader for service to the monarch or country, especially in a military capacity. Historically, in Europe, knighthood was conferred upon mounted warriors.[1] During the High Middle Ages, knighthood was considered a class of lower nobility. By the Late Middle Ages, the rank had become associated with the ideals of chivalry, a code of conduct for the perfect courtly Christian warrior. Often, a knight was a vassal who served as a fighter for a lord, with payment in the form of land holdings.[2] The lords trusted the knights, who were skilled in battle on horseback. Knighthood
Knighthood
in the Middle Ages was closely linked with horsemanship (and especially the joust) from its origins in the 12th century until its final flowering as a fashion among the high nobility in the Duchy of Burgundy in the 15th century
[...More...]

"Knight" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mythology
Mythology
Mythology
refers variously to the collected myths of a group of people[1] or to the study of such myths.[2] A folklore genre, myth is a feature of every culture. Many sources for myths have been proposed, ranging from personification of nature or personification of natural phenomena, to truthful or hyperbolic accounts of historical events to explanations of existing rituals. A culture's collective mythology helps convey belonging, shared and religious experiences, behavioral models, and moral and practical lessons. The study of myth began in ancient history. Rival classes of the Greek myths by Euhemerus, Plato
Plato
and Sallustius were developed by the Neoplatonists
Neoplatonists
and later revived by Renaissance
Renaissance
mythographers
[...More...]

"Mythology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
(Old East Slavic: Рѹ́сь (Rus'), Рѹ́сьскаѧ землѧ (Rus'skaya zemlya), Latin: Rus(s)ia, Ruscia, Ruzzia, Rut(h)enia,[2][3]) was a loose federation[4] of East Slavic tribes in Europe
Europe
from the late 9th to the mid-13th century,[5] under the reign of the Rurik
Rurik
dynasty
[...More...]

"Kievan Rus'" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Russian Language
Russian (Russian: ру́сский язы́к, tr. rússkiy yazýk) is an East Slavic language
East Slavic language
and an official language in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
and many minor or unrecognised territories throughout Eurasia
Eurasia
(particularly in Eastern Europe, the Baltics, the Caucasus, and Central Asia). It is an unofficial but widely spoken language in Latvia, Moldova, Ukraine
Ukraine
and to a lesser extent, the other post-Soviet states.[31][32] Russian belongs to the family of Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
and is one of the four living members of the East Slavic languages
Slavic languages
(which in turn is part of the larger Balto-Slavic branch)
[...More...]

"Russian Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.