HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Surma Stickfighting
Surma is a traditional local name for a people living in southwestern Ethiopia. It refers to the 'Suri', consisting of Chai, Tirmaga and Baale groups (self-names), politically and territorially different, but all speaking 'South East Surmic'[1] languages within the Nilo-Saharan, like Mursi, Majangir, and Me'en.Contents1 Overview 2 Shared culture 3 History3.1 Reports of displacement4 Religion and beliefs 5 Economy 6 Culture6.1 Stick fighting 6.2 Ways of life7 Notes 8 Sources and references 9 Further reading 10 External linksOverview[edit] The term Surma is also the Ethiopian government's collective name for the Suri, as expressed in the label 'Surma woreda' (= lower administrative district) in southwestern Ethiopia, bordering South Sudan
[...More...]

"Surma Stickfighting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ethiopia
Coordinates: 8°N 38°E / 8°N 38°E / 8; 38Federal Democratic Republic
Republic
of Ethiopia የኢትዮጵያ ፌዴራላዊ ዴሞክራሲያዊ ሪፐብሊክ yeʾĪtiyoṗṗya Fēdēralawī Dēmokirasīyawī RīpebilīkFlagEmblemAnthem:  ወደፊት ገስግሺ፣ ውድ እናት ኢትዮጵያ March Forward, Dear Mother EthiopiaCapital and largest city Addis Ababa 9°1′N 38°45′E / 9.017°N 38.750°E / 9.017; 38.750Official languages
[...More...]

"Ethiopia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cushitic Languages
The Cushitic languages
Cushitic languages
are a branch of the Afroasiatic language family
[...More...]

"Cushitic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Rainmaking
Rainmaking, also known as artificial precipitation, artificial rainfall and pluviculture, is the act of attempting to artificially induce or increase precipitation, usually to stave off drought. According to the clouds' different physical properties, this can be done using airplanes or rockets to sow to the clouds with catalysts such as dry ice, silver iodide and salt powder, to make clouds rain or increase precipitation, to remove or mitigate farmland drought, to increase reservoir irrigation water or water supply capacity, or to increase water levels for power generation. In the United States, rainmaking was attempted by traveling showmen. It was practiced in the old west, but may have reached a peak during the dust bowl drought of the American West and Midwest in the 1930s. The practice was depicted in the 1956 film The Rainmaker
[...More...]

"Rainmaking" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lip Plates
The lip plate, also known as a lip plug or lip disc, is a form of body modification. Increasingly large discs (usually circular, and made from clay or wood) are inserted into a pierced hole in either the upper or lower lip, or both, thereby stretching it. The term labret denotes all kinds of pierced-lip ornaments, including plates and plugs. Archaeological evidence indicates that labrets have been independently[citation needed] invented no fewer than six times, in Sudan and Ethiopia
Ethiopia
(8700 BC), Mesoamerica (1500 BC), and Coastal Ecuador (500 BC).[1] Today, the custom is maintained by a few groups in Africa and Amazonia.Contents1 Usage in Ethiopia 2 Usage in the Americas 3 List of traditional wearers 4 Ubangi misnomer 5 References 6 External linksUsage in Ethiopia[edit]Mursi woman wearing a lip plate in EthiopiaIn Africa, a lower lip plate is usually combined with the excision of the two lower front teeth, sometimes all four
[...More...]

"Lip Plates" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Scarification
Scarifying (also scarification modification) involves scratching, etching, burning / branding, or superficially cutting designs, pictures, or words into the skin as a permanent body modification.[1] In the process of body scarification, scars are formed by cutting or branding the skin by varying methods (sometimes using further sequential aggravating wound healing methods at timed intervals, like irritation), to purposely influence wound healing to scar more and not scar less
[...More...]

"Scarification" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

BBC
The British Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Corporation (BBC) is a British public service broadcaster. Its headquarters are at Broadcasting House
Broadcasting House
in Westminster, London
London
and it is the world's oldest national broadcasting organisation[3] and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees
[...More...]

"BBC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Discovery Channel
Discovery Channel
Discovery Channel
(known as The Discovery Channel
Discovery Channel
from 1985 to 1995, and often referred to as simply Discovery) is an American basic cable and satellite television channel (which is also delivered via IPTV, terrestrial television and internet television in other parts of the world) that is the flagship television property of Discovery Inc., a publicly traded company run by CEO David Zaslav. As of June 2012[update], Discovery Channel
Discovery Channel
is the third most widely distributed cable channel in the United States, behind TBS and The Weather Channel;[2] it is available in 409 million households worldwide, through its U.S
[...More...]

"Discovery Channel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Tribe (UK TV Series)
Tribe
Tribe
(known as Going Tribal in the United States) is a documentary television series co-produced by the BBC
BBC
and the Discovery Channel, and hosted by former British Royal Marine
Royal Marine
Bruce Parry. In each series, Parry visits a number of remote tribes in such locales as the Himalayas, Ethiopia, West Papua, Gabon
Gabon
and Mongolia, spending a month living and interacting with each society. While there, Parry adopts the methods and practices of his hosts, participating in their rituals and exploring their cultural norms. This often enables him to form personal bonds with the members of each tribe. Parry tries to learn the basics of the tribe's language but is also accompanied by a translator. The series is co-produced by BBC
BBC
Wales and the Discovery Channel
[...More...]

"Tribe (UK TV Series)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Cahiers D'études Africaines
The Cahiers d'Études africaines is a peer-reviewed open access academic journal covering topics in the social sciences as relating to Africa, the West Indies, and the African diaspora. It publishes regular special theme issues on specific regions, problems, or the state of a discipline. The Cahiers d’Études africaines was established in 1960 and is published by the Editions de l’EHESS, in collaboration with the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and the Centre national du livre. External links[edit]Official websiteThis article about a journal on area studies is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee tips for writing articles about academic journals
[...More...]

"Cahiers D'études Africaines" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Life Magazine
Life was an American magazine that ran regularly from 1883 to 1972 and again from 1978 to 2000. During its golden age from 1936 to 1972, Life was a wide-ranging weekly general interest magazine notable for the quality of the photography. Life began as a humor magazine with limited circulation. Time owner Henry Luce
Henry Luce
bought the magazine in 1936, solely so that he could acquire the rights to its name, and launched a major weekly news magazine with a strong emphasis on photojournalism. Life was published weekly until 1972, as an intermittent "special" until 1978, and as a monthly from 1978 to 2000. After 2000, Time Inc.
Time Inc.
continued to use the Life brand for special and commemorative issues
[...More...]

"Life Magazine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

List Of Ethnic Groups In Ethiopia
This is a list of ethnic groups in Ethiopia
Ethiopia
that are officially recognized by the government. It is a list taken from the 2007 Ethiopian National Census:[1] Population size and percentage of Ethiopia's total population according to the 1994 and 2007 censuses follows each entry. Ethiopia's population is highly diverse, containing over 80 different ethnic groups. Most people in Ethiopia
Ethiopia
speak Afro-Asiatic languages, mainly of the Cushitic and Semitic branches. The former includes the Oromo and Somali, and the latter includes the Amhara and Tigray. Together these four groups make up three-quarters of the population. The country also has Omotic ethnic minorities who speak Afro-Asiatic languages of the Omotic branch. They inhabit the southern regions of the country, particularly the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples' Region
[...More...]

"List Of Ethnic Groups In Ethiopia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Afroasiatic Languages
Afroasiatic (Afro-Asiatic), also known as Afrasian and traditionally as Hamito-Semitic (Chamito-Semitic)[3] or Semito-Hamitic,[4] is a large language family of about 300 languages and dialects.[5] It includes languages spoken predominantly in West Asia, North Africa, the Horn of Africa
Horn of Africa
and parts of the Sahel. Afroasiatic languages
Afroasiatic languages
have over 495 million native speakers, the fourth largest number of any language family (after Indo-European, Sino-Tibetan and Niger–Congo).[6] The phylum has six branches: Berber, Chadic, Cushitic, Egyptian, Omotic
Omotic
and Semitic. By far the most widely spoken Afroasiatic language is Arabic. A language within the Semitic branch, it includes Modern Standard Arabic as well as spoken colloquial varieties
[...More...]

"Afroasiatic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Afar People
The Afar (Afar: Qafár), also known as the Danakil, Adali and Odali, are an ethnic group inhabiting the Horn of Africa. They primarily live in the Afar Region
Afar Region
of Ethiopia
Ethiopia
and in northern Djibouti, although some also inhabit the southern point of Eritrea
[...More...]

"Afar People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dizi People
Dizi (also known as the Maji) is the name of an ethnic group living in southern Ethiopia. They share a number of somatic similarities with certain culturally (but not always linguistically) related peoples of south-western Ethiopia, which include the Sheko and Nao, the Gimira (She, Bench, Mere), the Tsara, the Dime, the Aari and certain sub-groups of the Basketo people. A. E. Jensen has gathered these groups under the label of the "ancient peoples of southern Ethiopia".[2] They speak the Dizin language (part of the Omotic languages). Before their forced incorporation into the Ethiopian Empire in the 1890s, based on their own statements and the evidence of numerous abandoned terraced hillsides, the Dizi are estimated to have numbered between 50,000 and 100,000
[...More...]

"Dizi People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Agaw People
The Agaw (Ge'ez: አገው Agaw; modern Agew) are an ethnic group inhabiting Ethiopia
Ethiopia
and neighboring Eritrea. They speak Agaw languages, which belong to the Cushitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family.Contents1 History 2 Language 3 Subgroups 4 Notable Agaw people 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]15th century icon of Gebre Mesqel Lalibela, the 12th century Zagwe dynasty King.The Agaw are perhaps first mentioned in the third-century Monumentum Adulitanum, an Aksumite inscription recorded by Cosmas Indicopleustes in the sixth century
[...More...]

"Agaw People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.