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Surform
A surform tool (also surface-forming tool[1]) features perforated sheet metal and resembles a food grater. A surform tool consists of a steel strip with holes punched out and the rim of each hole sharpened to form a cutting edge. The strip is mounted in a carriage or handle. Surform
Surform
tools were called "cheese graters"[2][3] decades before they entered the market as kitchen utensils used to grate cheese.[4][5] Surform
Surform
planes have been described as a cross between a rasp and a plane.[6] Although similar to many food graters made of perforated sheet metal, surforms differ in having sharpened rims
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Perforation
A perforation is a small hole in a thin material or web. There is usually more than one perforation in an organized fashion, where all of the holes are called a perforation. The process of creating perforations is called perforating, which involves puncturing the workpiece with a tool. Perforations are usually used to allow easy separation of two sections of the material, such as allowing paper to be torn easily along the line. Packaging
Packaging
with perforations in paperboard or plastic film is easy for consumers to open
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Kitchen Utensil
A kitchen utensil is a small hand held tool used for food preparation. Common kitchen tasks include cutting food items to size, heating food on an open fire or on a stove, baking, grinding, mixing, blending, and measuring; different utensils are made for each task. A general purpose utensil such as a chef's knife may be used for a variety of foods; other kitchen utensils are highly specialized and may be used only in connection with preparation of a particular type of food, such as an egg separator or an apple corer. Some specialized utensils are used when an operation is to be repeated many times, or when the cook has limited dexterity or mobility. The number of utensils in a household kitchen varies with time and the style of cooking. A cooking utensil is a utensil for cooking
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Bonsai
Bonsai
Bonsai
(盆栽, "tray planting"  pronunciation (help·info))[1] is a Japanese art
Japanese art
form using cultivation techniques to produce small trees in containers that mimic the shape and size of full size trees. Similar practices exist in other cultures, including the Chinese tradition of penzai or penjing from which the art originated, and the miniature living landscapes of Vietnamese hòn non bộ. The Japanese tradition dates back over a thousand years. "Bonsai" is a Japanese pronunciation of the earlier Chinese term penzai. The purposes of bonsai are primarily contemplation for the viewer, and the pleasant exercise of effort and ingenuity for the grower.[2] By contrast with other plant cultivation practices, bonsai is not intended for production of food or for medicine
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Deadwood Bonsai Techniques
Bonsai
Bonsai
is a Japanese art
Japanese art
using miniature trees grown in containers, similar in some ways to the Chinese art of penjing and the Vietnamese art of hòn non bộ. The Japanese tradition of bonsai cultivation contains many specialized terms and techniques for creating bonsai and enhancing the illusion of age and the portrayal of austerity[1] that mark a successful bonsai. Some of these methods are the deadwood techniques, which create, shape, and preserve dead wood on a living bonsai
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Drywall
Drywall
Drywall
(also known as plasterboard, wallboard, gypsum panel, sheet rock, or gypsum board) is a panel made of calcium sulfate dihydrate (gypsum), with or without additives, typically extruded between thick sheets of facer and backer paper, utilized in the construction of interior walls and ceilings.[1] The plaster is mixed with fiber (typically paper and/or fibreglass), plasticizer, foaming agent, and various additives that can decrease mildew, increase fire resistance, and lower water absorption.
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Automobile Repair Shop
An automobile repair shop (also known regionally as a garage or a workshop) is an establishment where automobiles are repaired by auto mechanics and technicians.Contents1 Types 2 Auto body repair 3 See also 4 ReferencesTypes[edit] Automotive garages and repair shops can be divided into following categories:The auto parts stores or motor-factors that also maintain service operations. This is not common in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
but more common in the US. Automobile
Automobile
repair workshops that are independently owned and operated businesses. These may also include regional or national chains and franchises including OEM car dealership sites[clarification needed]. In the United States, these sites are commonly certified by their respective manufacturer to perform warranty and recall repairs by that manufacturer or distributor[clarification needed]
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Panel Beater
A panel beater is a term used in some Commonwealth countries to describe a person who repairs vehicle bodies back to their factory state after having been damaged (e.g., after being involved in a collision).[1] Description[edit] In the USA and Canada, the same job is done by an auto body mechanic. They do this using many skills such as planishing as well as various other metalworking techniques, welding, use of putty fillers, and many more. Accident repair may require the panel beater to either repair or replace various parts of a vehicle. These parts may be made from various metals including various steels and alloys, many different plastics, fibreglass and others. The common panel beater will work on everyday vehicles, cars, vans, 4WDs for example. Specialised areas include repairs to motorcycles, trucks and even aircraft. Some panel beaters also work exclusively on vehicle restorations, and do not repair smash work at all
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Plastic Body Filler
Putty is a material with high plasticity, similar in texture to clay or dough, typically used in domestic construction and repair as a sealant or filler. Painter's Putty is typically a linseed oil-based product used for filling holes, minor cracks and defacements in wood only. Putties can also be made intumescent, in which case they are used for firestopping as well as for padding of electrical outlet boxes in fire-resistance rated drywall assemblies. In the latter case, hydrates in the putty produce an endothermic reaction to mitigate heat transfer to the unexposed side.Contents1 Use in construction 2 Other uses 3 See also 4 External linksUse in construction[edit] Putty has been used extensively in glazing for fixing and sealing panes of glass into wooden frames (or sashes), although its use is decreasing with the prevalence of PVC and metal window frames which use synthetic sealants such as silicone
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Lee Valley Tools
Lee Valley Tools Ltd. is a Canadian business specializing in tools and gifts for woodworking and gardening.Contents1 Corporate identity 2 Consumer sales 3 Veritas Tools 4 References 5 External linksCorporate identity[edit] The company is family-owned. The founder, Leonard Lee, was a recipient of the Order of Canada. He founded the company in 1978, in Ottawa, Ontario. Over the next ten years, the company opened several more stores (Toronto, Vancouver) and started manufacturing its own line of tools (starting with the Veritas Dovetail Marker in 1982). Since then, it has continued opening stores, manufacturing more diverse tools, and selling through mail order and the Internet. In 1998, Canica Design was launched
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Farriery
A farrier is a specialist in equine hoof care, including the trimming and balancing of horses' hooves and the placing of shoes on their hooves, if necessary. A farrier combines some blacksmith's skills (fabricating, adapting, and adjusting metal shoes) with some veterinarian's skills (knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the lower limb) to care for horses' feet.Contents1 History and ceremonial 2 Work2.1 Tools used3 Qualifications 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory and ceremonial[edit] Historically, the jobs of farrier and blacksmith were practically synonymous, shown by the etymology of the word: farrier comes from Middle French: ferrier (blacksmith), from the Latin
Latin
word ferrum (iron).[1] A farrier's work in colonial America or pre-Industrial Revolution Europe would have included shoeing horses, as well as the fabrication and repair of tools, the forging of architectural pieces, and so on
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Pearl Harbor (film)
Pearl Harbor
Pearl Harbor
is a 2001 American romantic period war drama film directed by Michael Bay, produced by Bay and Jerry Bruckheimer
Jerry Bruckheimer
and written by Randall Wallace. It stars Ben Affleck, Kate Beckinsale, Josh Hartnett, Cuba Gooding Jr., Tom Sizemore, Jon Voight, Colm Feore, and Alec Baldwin. The film is loosely based on the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor
Pearl Harbor
on December 7, 1941, and the Doolittle Raid. Despite receiving generally negative reviews from critics, the film was a major box office success, earning $59 million in its opening weekend and, in the end, nearly $450 million worldwide.[2] It was nominated for four Academy Awards, winning in the category of Best Sound Editing. However, it was also nominated for six Golden Raspberry Awards, including Worst Picture
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Anachronism
An anachronism (from the Greek ἀνά ana, "against" and χρόνος khronos, "time") is a chronological inconsistency in some arrangement, especially a juxtaposition of persons, events, objects, or customs from different periods of time. The most common type of anachronism is an object misplaced in time, but it may be a verbal expression, a technology, a philosophical idea, a musical style, a material, a plant or animal, a custom or anything else associated with a particular period in time so that it is incorrect to place it outside its proper temporal domain. An anachronism may be either intentional or unintentional. Intentional anachronisms may be introduced into a literary or artistic work to help a contemporary audience engage more readily with a historical period. Anachronism
Anachronism
can also be used for purposes of rhetoric, comedy, or shock
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Charles William Hayward
Sir Charles William Hayward, CBE (3 September 1892 – 3 February 1983) was an English businessman, investor, and philanthropist.Contents1 Early Family 2 Career 3 Hayward Foundation 4 Honours 5 Family life 6 References 7 External linksEarly Family[edit] Sir Charles was the second child of John Hayward, a cycle manufacturer, and Mary (née Williams). On the early death of his father in 1894, Sir Charles and his older sister Marion Daisy were raised by their maternal grandmother, Sarah Ann Williams (née Patten), a locksmith 'employer at home' at Church Lane, Wolverhampton. In 1908, Sarah Williams became the second wife of Joseph Stevens, the father of Harry, Joe junior, Jack and George Stevens who founded A. J. Stevens & Co (AJS) in 1909. Career[edit] Hayward began his career as an engineering apprentice, setting up his own business at the age of 19. He initially manufactured engineering patterns before moving into the emerging sidecar industry
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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