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Suranarai Road
Highways in Thailand MotorwaysThe railway bridge of northeastern rail route crosses over Suranarai Road in Amphoe Thep Sathit, Chaiyaphum Province Suranarai Road
Suranarai Road
(Thai: ถนนสุรนารายณ์) or Thailand
Thailand
Route 205 is a road connecting Lopburi
Lopburi
Province with northeastern Thailand. The road begins at Ban Mi District, Lopburi Province and ends at Mueang Nakhon Ratchasima
Nakhon Ratchasima
District, Nakhon Ratchasima Province. It is a strategic inter-regional road, linking the Lopburi
Lopburi
military base in central Thailand
Thailand
to Nakhon Ratchasima. The road was built in 1943, during Prime Minister Field marshal
Field marshal
Plaek Phibunsongkhram's tenure, but was not completed until 1951
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Narai
Narai[2] (Thai: นารายณ์; 16 February 1633 – 11 July 1688) or Ramathibodi III (รามาธิบดีที่ 3) or Ramathibodi Si Sanphet (รามาธิบดีศรีสรรเพชญ) was the king of Ayutthaya from 1656 to 1688 and arguably the most famous Ayutthayan king. His reign was the most prosperous during the Ayutthaya period and saw the great commercial and diplomatic activities with foreign nations including the Middle East and the West. During the later years of his reign, Narai
Narai
gave his favorite – the Greek adventurer Constantine Phaulkon
Constantine Phaulkon
– so much power that Phaulkon technically became the chancellor of the state. Through the arrangements of Phaulkon, the Siamese kingdom came into close diplomatic relations with the court of Louis XIV
Louis XIV
and French soldiers and missionaries filled the Siamese aristocracy and defense
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Ramesuan (king Of Ayutthaya)
Somdet Phra Ramesuan (Thai: สมเด็จพระราเมศวร) (1339–1395), son of king Ramathibodi I, reigned as the second and fifth king of the kingdom of Ayutthaya. When King Ramathibodi ascended to the throne of Ayuthaya, he sent King Ramesuan to reign in Lavo
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Yugala Dighambara
Prince Yugala Dighambara, Prince of Lopburi (March 17, 1882 – April 8, 1932) (Thai: สมเด็จพระเจ้าบรมวงศ์เธอ เจ้าฟ้ายุคลฑิฆัมพร กรมหลวงลพบุรีราเมศร์, RTGS: Chao Fa Yukhon Thikhamphon Krom Luang Lopburi Ramet), was a son of King Chulalongkorn
Chulalongkorn
of Siam. The Prince graduated from Cambridge University. He served as Viceroy of the South during the reign of his half-brother King Vajiravhud
Vajiravhud
and as the Minister of the Interior in the government of King Prajadhipok. He married Princess Chalermkhetra Mangala (Bhanubandh), a daughter of Prince Bhanurangsi Savangwongse. Their grandson is the filmmaker Prince Chatrichalerm Yugala. According to the announcement of his death in the Royal Gazette, Prince Yugala suffered from heart disease, dying at 3:05 p.m
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Lopburi River
The Lopburi
Lopburi
River (Thai: แม่น้ำลพบุรี, RTGS: Maenam Lop Buri, pronounced [mɛ̂ː.náːm lóp bū.rīː]) is a tributary of the Chao Phraya River
Chao Phraya River
in central Thailand. It splits from the Chao Phraya river at Tambon Bang Phutsa, Singburi. Passing through Tha Wung district and the town of Lopburi, it enters the Chao Phraya together with the Pa Sak River
Pa Sak River
at the town of Ayutthaya. It is about 95 kilometres (59 mi) long. Coordinates: 14°52′38″N 100°24′40″E / 14.87722°N 100.41111°E / 14.87722; 100.41111This article related to a river in Thailand
Thailand
is a stub
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Lam Sonthi District
Lam Sonthi (Thai: ลำสนธิ, pronounced [lām sǒn.tʰíʔ]) is the easternmost district (amphoe) of Lopburi Province, central Thailand.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Administration 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Lam Sonthi was created as a minor district (king amphoe) on 1 April 1989, by splitting off five tambon from the district Chai Badan.[1] It was upgraded to a full district on 5 December 1996.[2] The sixth tambon Khao Noi was created in 1994. Geography[edit] The name Lam Sonthi comes from the small Sonthi River that originates in the Sap Langka Wildlife Sanctuary, the last forest of Lopburi, in Tambon Kut Ta Phet in the very north of the district. Neighboring districts are (from the north clockwise) Si Thep and Wichian Buri of Phetchabun Province, Thep Sathit of Chaiyaphum Province, Thepharak, Dan Khun Thot and Sikhio of Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Muak Lek of Saraburi Province, and Tha Luang and Chai Badan of Lopburi Province. To
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Nakhon Ratchasima
Nakhon Ratchasima
Nakhon Ratchasima
(Thai: นครราชสีมา, pronounced [ná(ʔ).kʰɔ̄ːn râːt.t͡ɕʰā.sǐː.māː]) is one of the four major cities of Isan, Thailand, known as the "big four of Isan". The city is commonly known as Khorat (โคราช, pronounced [kʰōː.râːt]), a shortened form of its name. It is the governmental seat of the Nakhon Ratchasima Province
Nakhon Ratchasima Province
and Mueang Nakhon Ratchasima
Nakhon Ratchasima
District. Nakhon Ratchasima
Nakhon Ratchasima
is the heart of the Nakhon Ratchasima
Nakhon Ratchasima
metropolitan area. Korat
Korat
is at the western edge of the Korat
Korat
Plateau. Historically, it once marked the boundary between Lao and Siamese territory. It is the gateway to the Lao-speaking northeast (Isan)
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Pa Sak River
The Pa Sak River
Pa Sak River
(Thai: แม่น้ำป่าสัก, RTGS: Maenam Pa Sak, IPA: [mɛ̂ːnáːm pàː sàk], Pronunciation) is a river in central Thailand. The river originates in the Phetchabun Mountains, Dan Sai District, Loei Province, and passes through Phetchabun Province
Phetchabun Province
as the backbone of the province. It then passes through the eastern part of Lopburi Province
Lopburi Province
and Saraburi Province, until it joins together with the Lopburi River
Lopburi River
northeast of Ayutthaya Island, before it runs into the Chao Phraya River
Chao Phraya River
southeast of Ayutthaya near Phet Fortress. It has a length of 513 km (319 mi) and drains a watershed of 16,291 km2 (6,290 sq mi)
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Lopburi F.C.
Lopburi
Lopburi
Football Club (Thai: สโมสรฟุตบอลจังหวัดลพบุรี) is a Thai semi professional football club based in Lopburi
Lopburi
Province. The club currently plays in
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Bang Kham River
The Bang Kham River (Thai: แม่น้ำบางขาม, RTGS: Maenam Bang Kham, pronounced [mɛ̂ː.náːm bāːŋ kʰǎːm]) is a short tributary of the Lopburi River. It originates in Ban Mi district, Lopburi Province. It flows southward and tributes the Lopburi River in Tha Wung district. The river is only 20 kilometres (12 mi) long.This Lopburi Province location article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article related to a river in Thailand is a stub
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Phetchabun Province
Phetchabun (Thai: เพชรบูรณ์, pronounced [pʰét.t͡ɕʰā.būːn]) is one of the central or northern provinces (changwat) of Thailand.[1] Neighboring provinces are (from north clockwise) Loei, Khon Kaen, Chaiyaphum, Lopburi, Nakhon Sawan, Phichit, and Phitsanulok.Contents1 Geography 2 Administrative divisions 3 Etymology 4 History 5 Symbols 6 Transport6.1 Road 6.2 Air7 Tourism7.1 Sites 7.2 Festivals8 Local products 9 Notable people 10 References 11 External linksGeography[edit] Phetchabun is in the lower northern region of Thailand, in the area between the northern and the central region. The province lies in the broad fertile river valley of the Pa Sak River, with mountains of the Phetchabun mountain range to the east and west. It boasts national parks, waterfalls, and lakes. Administrative divisions[edit]The province is subdivided in 11 districts (amphoe)
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Amphoe
An amphoe (sometimes also amphur, Thai: อำเภอ, pronounced [ʔām.pʰɤ̄ː]) is the second level administrative subdivision of Thailand. Usually translated as "district". Amphoe make up the provinces, and are analogous to counties. The chief district officer is Nai Amphoe (นายอำเภอ). Amphoe are divided into tambons, or sub-districts. Altogether Thailand
Thailand
has 878 districts, not including the 50 districts of Bangkok
Bangkok
which are called khet (เขต) since the Bangkok administrative reform of 1972. The number of amphoe in provinces varies, from only three in the smallest provinces, up to the 50 urban districts of Bangkok. Also the sizes and population of amphoe differ greatly
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Amphoe Non Thai
Non Thai (Thai: โนนไทย, pronounced [nōːn tʰāj]) is a district (amphoe) of Nakhon Ratchasima Province, northeastern Thailand.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Administration3.1 Central administration 3.2 Local administration4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Originally, the area was Khwaeng San Thia (แขวงสันเทียะ). San Thia is Khmer language, meaning a place to fulfill salt. The name refers to the tradition of salt manufacturing in that area. In 1900, Khwaeng San Thia was changed to an Amphoe and renamed to Non Lao. However already in the following year it was named back to San Thia
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Amphoe Phra Thong Kham
Phra Thong Kham (Thai: พระทองคำ, pronounced [pʰráʔ tʰɔ̄ːŋ kʰām]) is a district (amphoe) in the northern part of Nakhon Ratchasima Province, northeastern Thailand.Contents1 History 2 Etymology 3 Geography 4 Administration 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Tambon Sa Phra, Thap Rang, Phang Thiam, Nong Hoi and Map Krat were separated from Non Thai district to create the Phra Thong Kham minor district on July 15, 1996.[1] Following a decision of the Thai government on May 15, 2007, all of the 81 minor districts were upgraded to full districts.[2] With the publishing in the Royal Gazette on August 24 the upgrade became official.[3] Etymology[edit] Phra Thong Kham in Thai language means Golden Lord Buddha image. The name Phra Thong Kham has two originsThe center of the minor district was located in Ban Pa Kham, Tambon Sa Phra
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Amphoe Bamnet Narong
Bamnet Narong (Thai: บำเหน็จณรงค์, pronounced [bām.nèt nā.rōŋ]) is a district (amphoe) in the southwestern part of Chaiyaphum Province, northeastern Thailand.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Administration 4 Economy 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] In the reign of King Rama II of Rattanakosin, the area of Bamnet Narong was a frontier town called Dan Chuan (ด่านชวน). As the town was in a strategic location, King Nangklao (Rama III) ordered a soldier from Mueang Khukhan to be the head of the town. In 1826, King Anouvong of Lan Xang moved his troops to Siam. At Nakhon Ratchasima, the headman of Dan Chuan led his soldiers to battle against the Laotian troop
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Amphoe Lam Sonthi
Lam Sonthi (Thai: ลำสนธิ, pronounced [lām sǒn.tʰíʔ]) is the easternmost district (amphoe) of Lopburi Province, central Thailand.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Administration 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Lam Sonthi was created as a minor district (king amphoe) on 1 April 1989, by splitting off five tambon from the district Chai Badan.[1] It was upgraded to a full district on 5 December 1996.[2] The sixth tambon Khao Noi was created in 1994. Geography[edit] The name Lam Sonthi comes from the small Sonthi River that originates in the Sap Langka Wildlife Sanctuary, the last forest of Lopburi, in Tambon Kut Ta Phet in the very north of the district. Neighboring districts are (from the north clockwise) Si Thep and Wichian Buri of Phetchabun Province, Thep Sathit of Chaiyaphum Province, Thepharak, Dan Khun Thot and Sikhio of Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Muak Lek of Saraburi Province, and Tha Luang and Chai Badan of Lopburi Province. To
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