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Supangmung
Supangmung
Supangmung
(reigned 1663–1670), also known as Chakradhwaj Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ চক্ৰধ্বজ সিংহ), was an important Ahom king under whom the Ahom kingdom took back Guwahati
Guwahati
from the Mughals following the reverses at the hands of Mir Jumla and the Treaty of Ghilajharighat. He is known for his fierce pride as an Ahom monarch.Contents1 Reign1.1 Ascension 1.2 Recapture of Guwahati 1.3 The Ideal Monarch 1.4 Death of King Chakradhwaj Singha2 See also 3 ReferencesReign[edit] Ascension[edit] Jayadhawaj Singha left no sons, so the Ahom nobles called in the Saring Raja and placed him on the throne. He was a cousin of the Jayadhwaj Singha, and a grandson of Suleng Deoraja, a previous Saring raja and the second son of Suhungmung
Suhungmung
(Gogoi 1968:448). The new monarch was named Supangmung
Supangmung
by the Deodhais
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Manas River
The Manas River
Manas River
(Pron: ˈmʌnəs; in Bhutan
Bhutan
Drangme Chhu; in China Niamjang[1]) is a transboundary river in the Himalayan foothills between southern Bhutan
Bhutan
and India. It is named after Manasa, the serpent god in Hindu mythology. It is the largest river system of Bhutan,[2] among its four major river systems; the other three are Amo Chu or Torsa
Torsa
river, Wong Chu or Raidak, Mo Chu or Sankosh. It is met by three other major streams before it again debouches into India
India
in western Assam. The total length of the river is 376 kilometres (234 mi), flows through Bhutan
Bhutan
for 272 kilometres (169 mi) and then through Assam
Assam
for 104 kilometres (65 mi) before it joins the mighty Brahmaputra River
Brahmaputra River
at Jogighopa
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Mir Jumla II
Jumla may refer to: Mir Jumla II (1591–1663), subahdar of Bengal Jumla District, one of the seventy-five districts of Nepal Jumla (town), seat of Jumla Distri
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Sukaphaa
Chaolung Sukaphaa
Sukaphaa
(r. 1228–1268), also Siu-Ka-Pha, the first Ahom king in medieval Assam, was the founder of the Ahom kingdom. A Tai prince originally from Mong Mao, (which is now included within the Dehong-Dai Singhpho Autonomous Prefecture of Yunnan
Yunnan
in Peoples Republic of China), the kingdom he established in 1228 existed for nearly six hundred years and in the process unified the various tribal and non-tribal peoples of the region that left a deep impact on the region
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Assamese Language
AncientDavaka KamarupaMedievalAhom Kingdom Chutiya Kingdom Kachari Kingdom Kamata Kingdom Baro-BhuyanColonialColonial Assam Assam
Assam
ProvincePeopleAhoms Assamese Brahmins Muslims Assamese Sikhs[7]Kalitas Kaibartas SutiyasTribes Bodos
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Guwahati
Guwahati
Guwahati
(/ɡʊwəˈhɑːti/ ( listen) Pragjyotishpura
Pragjyotishpura
in ancient Assam, Gauhati in the modern er
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Mughal Empire
The Mughal Empire
Empire
(Urdu: مغلیہ سلطنت‬‎, translit. Mughliyah Saltanat)[8][2] or Mogul Empire[9] was an empire in the Indian subcontinent, founded in 1526
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Treaty Of Ghilajharighat
The Treaty of Ghilajharighat, Tipam, was signed between the Ahoms and the Mughal forces led by Mir Jumla on January 23, 1663
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Koch Hajo
Koch Hajo[1] (1581-1616) was the kingdom under Raghudev and his son Parikshit Narayan of the Koch dynasty
Koch dynasty
that stretched from Sankosh river in the west to the Bhareli river
Bhareli river
in the east on the north bank of the Brahmaputra
Brahmaputra
river. It was created by dividing the Kamata kingdom[2] then under Nara Narayana
Nara Narayana
in medieval Assam. The Sankosh river divided the two new kingdoms, and it is roughly the boundary between the present-day Assam
Assam
and West Bengal. The western half of the Kamata kingdom
Kamata kingdom
emerged as Koch Bihar
Koch Bihar
whereas the eastern half emerged as Koch Hajo
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Aurangzeb
Muhi-ud-Din Muhammad[3] (Persian: محي الدين محمد‎) (3 November 1618 – 3 March 1707),[1] commonly known by the sobriquet Aurangzeb
Aurangzeb
(Persian: اورنگ‌زیب‎ "Ornament of the Throne")[3] or by his regnal title Alamgir (Persian: عالمگير‎ "Conqueror of the World"),[4] was the sixth, and widely considered the last effective Mughal emperor
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Lachit Borphukan
Lachit Borphukan (Assamese: লাচিত বৰফুকন ) was a commander and Borphukan in the Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
known for his leadership in the 1671 Battle of Saraighat
Battle of Saraighat
that thwarted a drawn-out attempt by Mughal forces under the command of Ramsingh I
Ramsingh I
to take back Kamrup.[1][2] He died about a year later due to illness.[3]
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Itakhuli
Itakhuli or Sukreswar Hill is a small hill on the south bank of the Brahmaputra
Brahmaputra
at Guwahati. The past official residence of the Deputy Commissioner of Kamrup District of Assam
Assam
was located on top of this hill. The D.C. bungalow was vacated for the Brahmaputra
Brahmaputra
river side development. Adjacent to it in the western side of the D.C.'s bungalow is the Sukreswar Temple. Itakhuli hill have always have been of strategic importance it was the seat of the viceroys and a garrison since the early days of Kamrup from Ahom, to Mughal and to the British
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Suremphaa
Suremphaa
Suremphaa
(reign 1751–1769), or Swargadeo Rajeswar Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ ৰাজেশ্বৰ সিংহ), the fourth son of Rudra Singha, became the king of the Ahom kingdom after the death of his brother King Pramatta Singha. Rudra Singha's third son, Mohanmala Gohain, was considered ineligible for kingship as his face was pitted with smallpox marks. According to the norm established after Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
Lora Roja, an Ahom prince had to be free from any physical disability, defects or deformities to become a king. The new king was installed with the usual ceremonies
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Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
or Ratnadhwaj Singha was the king of the Ahom Kingdom
Ahom Kingdom
(now in northeast India) from 1679 CE to 1681 CE. He was only fourteen years of age when Laluksola Borphukan, the Ahom viceroy of Guwahati and Lower Assam, raised him to the throne, after deposing the former king, Sudoiphaa. Due to his youth at the time of his accession, he was generally known as Lora Raja or the Boy-king. His reign was characterized by the atrocities committed by Laluksola Borphukan, who held the real authority behind the throne. The most notorious act which occurred during his reign was the mutilation of Ahom princes belonging to the Royal Ahom Dynasty
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Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
or Supaatpha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ গদাধৰ সিংহ, reign 1681–1696[1]) established the rule of the Tungkhungia clan of the Ahom kings that ruled the Ahom kingdom till its climactic end. He was the son of Gobar Roja, a descendant of Suhungmung, and who had become the king for a mere 20 days. Previously known as Gadapani, Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
was able to stabilize the kingdom after the decade long turmoil following the Ahom victory in the Battle of Saraighat. This period saw the ruthless power grab of Debera Borbarua and Laluksola Borphukan's abandonment of Guwahati
Guwahati
and oppression via Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
Lora Roja. Gadadhar Singha retook Guwahati
Guwahati
from the Mughals for good, and established a strong rule of 'blood and iron'
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Sukhrungphaa
Sukhrungphaa
Sukhrungphaa
(reigned 1696–1714), or Swargadeu Rudra Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ ৰূদ্ৰ সিংহ Sorgodeu Rudro Xingho), was a Tungkhungia king of the Ahom kingdom under whom the kingdom reached its zenith of power and glory. Rudra Singha, known as Lai before he became the king, was the son of the previous Ahom king Gadadhar Singha. An illiterate (probably dyslexic), he is best known for building a coalition of rulers in the region and raising a vast composite army against the Mughal Empire. He died on the eve of his march west from Guwahati. His father had to escape persecution by the previous Ahom king and his mother, Joymoti Konwari, was killed in royal custody. He established his capital at Rangpur.Silver rupee of Sukhrungphaa. The legends read: obverse: sri srimat swarga deva rudra simhasya sake 1622 and reverse: sri sri hara gauri padambuja madhu karasya
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