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Suo Chao
Suo Chao
Suo Chao
is a fictional character in Water Margin, one of the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature. He ranks 19th of the 36 Heavenly Spirits of the 108 Liangshan heroes and is nicknamed "Impatient Vanguard".Contents1 Background 2 Becoming an outlaw 3 Campaigns and death 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] The novel describes Suo Chao
Suo Chao
as seven chi tall, with a round face, big ears, a squarish mouth and a beard which overshadows his face. His physical appearance gives him an impressive bearing and makes him seem like a hero. He serves as an imperial general in Daming Prefecture (大名府; in present-day Handan, Hebei) under the governor, Grand Secretary Liang Shijie. He is nicknamed "Impatient Vanguard" because of his hot temper and tendency to always charge ahead of his men in battle
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Emperor Huizong Of Song
Emperor Huizong of Song
Emperor Huizong of Song
(7 June 1082[citation needed] – 4 June 1135), personal name Zhao Ji, was the eighth emperor of the Song dynasty in China. He was also a very well-known calligrapher. Born as the 11th son of Emperor Shenzong, he ascended the throne in 1100 upon the death of his elder brother and predecessor, Emperor Zhezong, because Emperor Zhezong's only son died prematurely. He lived in luxury, sophistication and art in the first half of his life. In 1126, when the Jurchen-led Jin dynasty invaded the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
during the Jin–Song Wars, Emperor Huizong abdicated and passed on his throne to his eldest son, Emperor Qinzong, while he assumed the honorary title of Taishang Huang (or "Retired Emperor"). The following year, the Song capital, Bianjing, was conquered by Jin forces in an event historically known as the Jingkang Incident
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Chen Hongshou
Chen Hongshou
Chen Hongshou
(1598–1652), formerly romanized as Ch'en Hung-shou, was a Chinese painter of the late Ming dynasty.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Gallery 4 See also4.1 Notes5 References 6 External linksLife[edit]Tomb of Chen Hongshou
Chen Hongshou
in Shaoxing.Chen was born in Zhuji, Zhejiang
Zhejiang
province in 1598, during the Ming dynasty. His courtesy name was Zhanghou (章侯), and his pseudonyms were Laolian (老莲), Fuchi (弗迟), Yunmenseng (云门僧), Huichi (悔迟), Chiheshang (迟和尚) and Huiseng (悔僧).[1] He once trained under Lan Ying, and was skilled in painting peculiar human figures, landscapes, flower-and-bird. He utilized plump, profound brushwork and precise color, creating a unique style. He always painted illustrations and made tapestry portraits
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Liao Dynasty
The Liao dynasty
Liao dynasty
(/ljaʊ/;[3] Khitan: Mos Jælud; simplified Chinese: 辽朝; traditional Chinese: 遼朝; pinyin: Liáo cháo),[4] also known as the Liao Empire, officially the Great Liao (simplified Chinese: 大辽; traditional Chinese: 大遼; pinyin: Dà Liáo), or the Khitan Empire (Khitan: Mos diau-d kitai huldʒi gur ),[5], was an empire in East Asia
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Hangzhou
Hangzhou
Hangzhou
(Mandarin: [xǎŋ.ʈʂóu] ( listen); local dialect: /ɦɑŋ tseɪ/) formerly romanized as Hangchow, is the capital and most populous city of Zhejiang
Zhejiang
Province in east China.[2] It sits at the head of Hangzhou
Hangzhou
Bay, which separates Shanghai
Shanghai
and Ningbo. Hangzhou
Hangzhou
grew to prominence as the southern terminus of the Grand Canal and has been one of the most renowned and prosperous cities in China
China
for much of the last millennium
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Pearl S. Buck
Pulitzer Prize 1932 Nobel Prize in Literature 1938Spouse John Lossing Buck (1917–1935) Richard J. Walsh (1935–1960) until his deathSignaturePearl S. BuckTraditional Chinese 賽珍珠Simplified Chinese 赛珍珠Literal meaning Precious PearlTranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin Sài ZhēnzhūWade–Giles Sai Chen-chuIPA [saɪ˥˩ tʂən˥ tʂu˥]Pearl Sydenstricker Buck (June 26, 1892 – March 6, 1973; also known by her Chinese name Sai Zhenzhu; Chinese: 賽珍珠) was an American writer and novelist. As the daughter of missionaries, Buck spent most of her life before 1934 in Zhenjiang, China. Her novel The Good Earth was the best-selling fiction book in the United States in 1931 and 1932 and won the Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
in 1932
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Mount Liang
Coordinates: 35°47′11.86″N 116°5′33.10″E / 35.7866278°N 116.0925278°E / 35.7866278; 116.0925278This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (January 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Mount Liang (Chinese: 梁山; pinyin: Liáng Shān, often referred to as Chinese: 水泊梁山; pinyin: Shuǐ Bó Liáng Shān) is a mountain in Liangshan County, Shandong
Shandong
province, China which rises to 197.9 m above sea level. It is well known as the stronghold of the 108 legendary Song Dynasty
Song Dynasty
heroes of the classic Chinese novel Water Margin
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Bandit Kings Of Ancient China
Bandit Kings of Ancient China, also known as Suikoden: Tenmei no Chikai (水滸伝・天命の誓い, lit. Water Margin: Oath of Destiny) in Japan, is a turn-based strategy video game developed and published by Koei,[1] and released in 1989 for MS-DOS, Amiga
Amiga
and the Macintosh
Macintosh
and in 1990 for the Nintendo Entertainment System.[2][3][4] In 1996, Koei
Koei
issued a remake for the Japanese Sega Saturn
Sega Saturn
and Sony PlayStation
PlayStation
featuring vastly improved graphics and new arrangements of the original songs.[citation needed]Contents1 Gameplay 2 Reception 3 References 4 External linksGameplay[edit] Based on the Great Classical Novel Water Margin, the game takes place in ancient China
China
during the reign of Emperor Huizong of the Song Dynasty
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Handan
Handan
Handan
is a prefecture-level city located in the southwestern part of Hebei
Hebei
province, China. It borders Xingtai
Xingtai
on the north, and the provinces of Shanxi
Shanxi
on the west, Henan
Henan
on the south and Shandong
Shandong
on the east
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Chi (unit)
The chi is a traditional Chinese unit of length. Although it is often translated as the "Chinese foot", its length was originally derived from the distance measured by a human hand, from the tip of the thumb to the tip of the forefinger[1] similar to the ancient Span. It first appeared during China's Shang dynasty
Shang dynasty
approximately 3000 years ago and has since been adopted by other East Asian cultures such as Japan (shaku), Korea
Korea
(ja), and Vietnam. Its present value is standardized around one-third of a meter, although the exact standards vary among the mainland of the People's Republic of China, its special administrative region of Hong Kong, and Taiwan. In its ancient and modern forms, the chi is divided into 10 smaller units known as cun (the "Chinese inch")
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Chinese Literature
The history of Chinese literature
Chinese literature
extends thousands of years, from the earliest recorded dynastic court archives to the mature vernacular fiction novels that arose during the Ming Dynasty
Ming Dynasty
to entertain the masses of literate Chinese. The introduction of widespread woodblock printing during the Tang Dynasty
Tang Dynasty
(618–907) and the invention of movable type printing by Bi Sheng (990–1051) during the Song Dynasty (960–1279) rapidly spread written knowledge throughout China
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Four Great Classical Novels
Classic Chinese Novels is one of several terms used in sinological scholarship to refer to various groupings of the four to six most well-known traditional Chinese novels. A very often used term is Four Classic Novels, which includes Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Journey to the West, Water Margin
Water Margin
and Dream of the Red Chamber; yet another is Six Classic Novels, which additionally includes The Scholars and The Plum in the Golden Vase. These are among the world's longest and oldest novels,[1] and they are the most read, studied and adapted works of pre-modern Chinese fiction.[2][3][4][5]Contents1 Nomenclature and subgroupings 2 Background 3 Influences 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further readingNomenclature and subgroupings[edit] Several terms have been used to refer to the novels and various subgroupings of them
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Chinese Surname
Chinese surnames are used by Han Chinese
Han Chinese
and Sinicized ethnic groups in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Malaysia, Brunei, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam
Vietnam
and among overseas Chinese communities. In ancient times two types of surnames existed, namely xing (Chinese: 姓; pinyin: xìng) or clan names, and shi (Chinese: 氏; pinyin: shì) or lineage names. Chinese family names are patrilineal, passed from father to children (in adoption, the adoptee usually also takes the same surname). Women do not normally change their surnames upon marriage, except in places with more Western influences such as Hong Kong. Traditionally Chinese surnames have been exogamous.[1][2] The colloquial expressions laobaixing (老百姓; lit. "old hundred surnames") and bǎixìng (百姓, lit
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Wade–Giles
Wade–Giles (/ˌweɪd ˈdʒaɪlz/), sometimes abbreviated Wade,[citation needed] is a Romanization system for Mandarin Chinese. It developed from a system produced by Thomas Wade, during the mid-19th century, and was given completed form with Herbert A. Giles's Chinese–English Dictionary of 1892. Wade–Giles was the system of transcription in the English-speaking world for most of the 20th century, used in standard reference books and in English language books published before 1979. It replaced the Nanking dialect-based romanization systems that had been common until the late 19th century, such as the Postal Romanization (still used in some place-names). In mainland China it has been entirely replaced by the Hànyǔ Pīnyīn system approved in 1958. Outside mainland China, it has mostly been replaced by Pīnyīn, even though Taiwan implements a multitude of Romanization systems in daily life
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