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Sunyeophaa
Sunyeophaa
Sunyeophaa
(1769–1780), also called Lakshmi Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ লক্ষ্মী সিংহ), was an Ahom king. Shortly after he was installed he became a captive of the rebels of the Moamoria rebellion for a few months but soon regained his kingdom. See also[edit]Ahom dynastyReferences[edit]Gogoi, Padmeshwar (1968), The Tai and the Tai Kingdoms, Guwahati: Gauhati University This biography of a member of an Indian royal house is a stub
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Moamoria Rebellion
The Moamoria rebellion (1769–1805) was the 18th century conflict between the Moamorias, who were mainly Motok( Chutias and Morans) and Kachari adherents of the Moamara Sattra, and the Ahom kings. This led to widespread popular discontent against the Ahom king and the nobles and to two periods in which the Ahom king lost control of the capital. Retaking the capital was accompanied by a massacre of subjects, leading to a steep depopulation of large tracts. The Ahom king failed to retake the entire kingdom; a portion in the north-east, Bengmara, became virtually independent. The Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
emerged from the rebellion much weakened
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Sukaphaa
Chaolung Sukaphaa
Sukaphaa
(r. 1228–1268), also Siu-Ka-Pha, the first Ahom king in medieval Assam, was the founder of the Ahom kingdom. A Tai prince originally from Mong Mao, (which is now included within the Dehong-Dai Singhpho Autonomous Prefecture of Yunnan
Yunnan
in Peoples Republic of China), the kingdom he established in 1228 existed for nearly six hundred years and in the process unified the various tribal and non-tribal peoples of the region that left a deep impact on the region
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Assamese Language
AncientDavaka KamarupaMedievalAhom Kingdom Chutiya Kingdom Kachari Kingdom Kamata Kingdom Baro-BhuyanColonialColonial Assam Assam
Assam
ProvincePeopleAhoms Assamese Brahmins Muslims Assamese Sikhs[7]Kalitas Kaibartas SutiyasTribes Bodos
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Jogeswar Singha
Jogeswar Singha
Jogeswar Singha
was installed as the king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
in 1821 CE, by the Burmese. He was more or less a puppet in the hands of the Burmese, who held the real power of administration. His reign witnessed Burmese atrocities on the people of Assam
Assam
and the attempts made by Chandrakanta Singha
Chandrakanta Singha
and Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
to expel Burmese invaders
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Sudingphaa
Sudingphaa
Sudingphaa
(or Chandrakanta Singha) (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ চন্দ্ৰকান্ত সিংহ) (1811–1818, 1819–1821) was a Tungkhungia king of the Ahom dynasty, who ruled at the climactic of the Ahom kingdom. His reign witnessed the invasion of Burmese on Assam
Assam
and its subsequent occupation by British East India Company. He was installed as King twice. His first reign ended when Ruchinath Burhagohain deposed him and installed Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
in his stead. His second reign ended with his defeat at the hands of the invading Burmese army. He continued his militant efforts to regain his kingdom as well as to keep Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
at bay. Finally he submitted himself to Burmese who induced him to believe that they will make him king. Instead he was seized and placed in confinement at Rangpur
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Suklingphaa
Suklingphaa
Suklingphaa
(1795–1811), or Kamaleswar Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ কমলেশ্বৰ সিংহ), was a king of the Ahom kingdom. His reign witnessed the suppression of Moamoria rebellion and restoration of Ahom rule over Upper Assam. The Dundiya Revolution in Kamrup was also suppressed during his reign. In Nagaon, the Ahom army also managed to defeat a coalition of Moamoria rebels and the Kacharis of Kachari Kingdom. Since the monarch was very young, the administration of the kingdom was run by Purnananda Burhagohain, the Prime Minister of Ahom Kingdom, who was an able administrator and general
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Suhitpangphaa
Suhitpangphaa
Suhitpangphaa
(1780–1795), also Gaurinath Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ গৌৰীনাথ সিংহ), was an Ahom king of the Ahom kingdom. He lost his capital Rangpur to the Moamoria rebellion and camped in the Nagaon and Guwahati region till Captain Welsh removed the rebels
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Suremphaa
Suremphaa
Suremphaa
(reign 1751–1769), or Swargadeo Rajeswar Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ ৰাজেশ্বৰ সিংহ), the fourth son of Rudra Singha, became the king of the Ahom kingdom after the death of his brother King Pramatta Singha. Rudra Singha's third son, Mohanmala Gohain, was considered ineligible for kingship as his face was pitted with smallpox marks. According to the norm established after Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
Lora Roja, an Ahom prince had to be free from any physical disability, defects or deformities to become a king. The new king was installed with the usual ceremonies
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Ahom Kingdom
Assam, Nagaland, Tripura, Manipur, Arunachal Pradesh
Arunachal Pradesh
part of IndiaAhom dynasty1 Sukaphaa 1228–12682 Suteuphaa 1268–12813 Subinphaa 1281–12934 Sukhaangphaa 1293–13325 Sukhrangpha 1332–1364Interregnum 1364–13696 Sutuphaa 1369–1376Interregnum 1376–13807 Tyao Khamti 1380–1389Interregnum 1389–13978 Sudangphaa 1397–14079 Sujangphaa 1407–142210 Suphakphaa 1422–14391
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Sukhrungphaa
Sukhrungphaa
Sukhrungphaa
(reigned 1696–1714), or Swargadeu Rudra Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ ৰূদ্ৰ সিংহ Sorgodeu Rudro Xingho), was a Tungkhungia king of the Ahom kingdom under whom the kingdom reached its zenith of power and glory. Rudra Singha, known as Lai before he became the king, was the son of the previous Ahom king Gadadhar Singha. An illiterate (probably dyslexic), he is best known for building a coalition of rulers in the region and raising a vast composite army against the Mughal Empire. He died on the eve of his march west from Guwahati. His father had to escape persecution by the previous Ahom king and his mother, Joymoti Konwari, was killed in royal custody. He established his capital at Rangpur.Silver rupee of Sukhrungphaa. The legends read: obverse: sri srimat swarga deva rudra simhasya sake 1622 and reverse: sri sri hara gauri padambuja madhu karasya
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Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
or Supaatpha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ গদাধৰ সিংহ, reign 1681–1696[1]) established the rule of the Tungkhungia clan of the Ahom kings that ruled the Ahom kingdom till its climactic end. He was the son of Gobar Roja, a descendant of Suhungmung, and who had become the king for a mere 20 days. Previously known as Gadapani, Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
was able to stabilize the kingdom after the decade long turmoil following the Ahom victory in the Battle of Saraighat. This period saw the ruthless power grab of Debera Borbarua and Laluksola Borphukan's abandonment of Guwahati
Guwahati
and oppression via Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
Lora Roja. Gadadhar Singha retook Guwahati
Guwahati
from the Mughals for good, and established a strong rule of 'blood and iron'
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Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
or Ratnadhwaj Singha was the king of the Ahom Kingdom
Ahom Kingdom
(now in northeast India) from 1679 CE to 1681 CE. He was only fourteen years of age when Laluksola Borphukan, the Ahom viceroy of Guwahati and Lower Assam, raised him to the throne, after deposing the former king, Sudoiphaa. Due to his youth at the time of his accession, he was generally known as Lora Raja or the Boy-king. His reign was characterized by the atrocities committed by Laluksola Borphukan, who held the real authority behind the throne. The most notorious act which occurred during his reign was the mutilation of Ahom princes belonging to the Royal Ahom Dynasty
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Sudoiphaa
Sudoiphaa
Sudoiphaa
or Tej Singha was the king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
from 1677 CE to 1679 CE. After deposing king Sujinphaa, Atan Burhagohain, the Prime-Minister of Ahom Kingdom, installed Sudoiphaa
Sudoiphaa
in the throne. Sudoiphaa's reign witnessed the end of ministerial dictatorship of Atan Burhagohain and rise of Laluksola Borphukan, the Ahom Viceroy of Guwahati
Guwahati
and Lower Assam, as the real authority behind the throne
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Sujinphaa
Sujinphaa
Sujinphaa
(fl. 1675–1677) or Sur Singha was a Namrupiya king of the Ahom kingdom. Atan Burhagohain installed him on the throne after removing Debera Borbarua from power and deposing the previous king, Gobar Roja. Sujinphaa
Sujinphaa
began his reign well with proper advice and support from Atan Burhagohain and other nobles. But soon, acting on the advice of his wife and other advisors, the king began to defy the authority of the Burhagohain, which resulted in a head-on collision between both sides. The king successfully defended the first onslaught of Atan Burhagohain's forces, but fell to the second, which was reinforced with troops from Guwahati. Sujinphaa
Sujinphaa
was deposed and blinded
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