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Sunday Magazine
A Sunday magazine
Sunday magazine
is a publication inserted into a Sunday newspaper. It also has been known as a Sunday supplement, Sunday newspaper magazine or Sunday magazine
Sunday magazine
section
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Lord's Day Alliance
The Lord's Day
Lord's Day
Alliance (formerly known as the American Sabbath Union) is an ecumenical Christian first-day Sabbatarian organization,[1] based in the United States
United States

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Joseph Pulitzer
Joseph J. Pulitzer (/ˈpʊlɪtsər/ ( listen);[2] Hungarian: [ˈpulit͡sɛr]; born József Pulitzer;[a] April 10, 1847 – October 29, 1911) was a newspaper publisher of the St. Louis Post Dispatch and the New York World. Pulitzer introduced the techniques of yellow journalism (a type of journalism that presents little or no legitimate well-researched news) to the newspapers he acquired in the 1880s. He became a leading national figure in the Democratic Party and was elected congressman from New York
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Sunday Telegraph
The Sunday Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper, founded in February 1961, and is published by the Telegraph Media Group, a division of Press Holdings. It is the sister paper of The Daily Telegraph, also published by the Telegraph Media Group. Originally a separate operation with a different editorial staff, since 2013 the Telegraph has been a seven-day operation. [3] References[edit]^ "General Election 2015 explained: Newspapers". The Independent. London. 28 April 2015. Retrieved 9 December 2016. A study of the 2010 general election by Dominic Wring and David Deacon, of the Department of Social Sciences, Loughborough University, identified the following patterns of alleged “partisanship” in UK national newspapers: ... Sunday Telegraph: Conservative (strong)  ^ "ABCs: Increased bulks help Telegraph become only UK newspaper to increase circulation in November". Press Gazette
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The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
is a British daily newspaper. It was known from 1821 until 1959 as the Manchester
Manchester
Guardian. Along with its sister papers The Observer and the Guardian Weekly, The Guardian
The Guardian
is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust
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The Washington Post
The Washington Post
The Washington Post
is an American daily newspaper. Published in Washington, D.C., it was founded on December 6, 1877.[7] Located in the capital city of the United States, the newspaper has a particular emphasis on national politics. The newspaper's slogan states, "Democracy dies in darkness". Daily editions are printed for the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. It is published as a broadsheet. The newspaper has won 47 Pulitzer Prizes. This includes six separate Pulitzers awarded in 2008, second only to The New York Times' seven awards in 2002 for the highest number ever awarded to a single newspaper in one year.[8] Post journalists have also received 18 Nieman Fellowships and 368 White House
White House
News Photographers Association awards
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Grit (newspaper)
Grit is a magazine, formerly a weekly newspaper, popular in the rural US during much of the 20th century. It carried the subtitle "America's Greatest Family Newspaper". In the early 1930s, it targeted small town and rural families with 14 pages plus a fiction supplement. By 1932, it had a circulation of 425,000 in 48 states, and 83% of its circulation was in towns of fewer than 10,000 population.Contents1 History 2 Little League
Little League
and newsboy sales 3 Content 4 Comic strips 5 From Williamsport to Topeka 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksHistory[edit] The publication was founded in 1882 as the Saturday edition of the Williamsport, Pennsylvania, Daily Sun and Banner
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Joseph P. Knapp
Joseph Palmer Knapp (May 14, 1864 – January 30, 1951) was an American publisher and philanthropist. He was the son of Joseph Fairchild and Phoebe Palmer Knapp. His father was a past president of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company
and his mother was a hymn writer, credited with over 500 hymns, most notably "Blessed Assurance" with Fanny Crosby. J.P. was interested in game bird conservation, and founded the More Game Birds in America Foundation (with others including J. P. Morgan), which today is known as Ducks Unlimited.[1] Knapp has been credited with the invention of the multicolor six-cylinder press.[2] He contributed greatly to the Currituck County Schools in North Carolina and to the University of North Carolina.[3] Currituck County dedicated one of their public schools to Knapp. This school is currently the J.P
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New York Journal
The New York Journal-American
New York Journal-American
was a daily newspaper published in New York City from 1937 to 1966. The Journal-American was the product of a merger between two New York newspapers owned by William Randolph Hearst: The New York American (originally the New York Journal, renamed American in 1901), a morning paper, and the New York Evening Journal, an afternoon paper. Both were published by Hearst from 1895 to 1937. The American and Evening Journal merged in 1937. The Journal-American was a publication with several editions in the afternoon and evening.Contents1 Circulation war 2 Comics 3 Reporters 4 Columnists 5 Staff 6 Photographs 7 Decline 8 Merger 9 Archives 10 Gallery 11 References 12 External linksCirculation war[edit] Joseph Pulitzer's younger brother Albert founded the New York Morning Journal in 1882. John R
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Sunday (magazine)
The Lord's Day Alliance (formerly known as the American Sabbath Union) is an ecumenical Christian first-day Sabbatarian organization,[1] based in the United States and Canada that was founded in 1888 by mainstream Christian denominations.[2] These Churches worked together to found the Lord's Day Alliance in order to effect change in the public sphere, specially with respect to "lobbying for the passage of Sunday-rest laws."[2] The Lord's Day Alliance publishes a quarterly magazine called Sunday.[3] Erwin Fahlbusch and Geoffrey William Bromiley write that throughout its existence, the Lord's Day Alliance, supported by labor unions, has lobbied "to prevent secular and commercial interests from hampering freedom of worship and from exploiting workers."[4] For example, the United States Congress was supported by the Lord's Day Alliance in securing "a day of rest for city postal clerks whose hours of labor, unlike those of city mail carriers, were largely unregulated."[5] The Canadian branc
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New York World
The New York World
New York World
was a newspaper published in New York City from 1860 until 1931. The paper played a major role in the history of American newspapers. It was a leading national voice of the Democratic Party. From 1883 to 1911 under publisher Joseph Pulitzer, it became a pioneer in yellow journalism, capturing readers' attention and pushing its daily circulation to the one-million mark.Contents1 Early years 2 Joseph Pulitzer
Joseph Pulitzer
years 3 Later years 4 Legacy 5 Revival 6 Notable journalists of the World 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEarly years[edit] The World was formed in 1860. From 1862 to 1876, it was edited by Manton Marble, who was also its proprietor
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William Randolph Hearst
William Randolph Hearst
William Randolph Hearst
Sr. (/hɜːrst/;[1] April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American businessman, politician, and newspaper publisher who built the nation's largest newspaper chain and media company Hearst Communications
Hearst Communications
and whose flamboyant methods of yellow journalism influenced the nation's popular media by emphasizing sensationalism and human interest stories. Hearst entered the publishing business in 1887 after being given control of The San Francisco Examiner by his wealthy father. Moving to New York City, he acquired The New York Journal
New York Journal
and fought a bitter circulation war with Joseph Pulitzer's New York World
New York World
that sold papers by giant headlines over lurid stories featuring crime, corruption, graphics, sex, and innuendo
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Chicago Inter Ocean
The Chicago
Chicago
Inter Ocean, also known as the Chicago
Chicago
Inter-Ocean, is the name used for most of its history for a newspaper published in Chicago, Illinois, from 1865 until 1914. Its editors included Charles A. Dana and Byron Andrews.Contents1 History1.1 Founding 1.2 Growth 1.3 Demise 1.4 Locations2 See also 3 ReferencesHistory[edit] Founding[edit] The history of the Inter Ocean can be traced back to 1865 with the founding of the Chicago
Chicago
Republican, a partisan newspaper that supported the Republican party. Jacob Bunn, a prominent Illinois financier and industrialist, was the principal founder, and at one time the sole owner, of the Chicago
Chicago
Republican Company, and cooperated with several other Illinois financiers to establish the newspaper company in 1865
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Kansas State University
Kansas
Kansas
State University
University
(KSU), commonly shortened to Kansas
Kansas
State or K-State, is a public research university with its main campus in Manhattan, Kansas, United States. Kansas
Kansas
State was opened as the state's land-grant college in 1863 – the first public institution of higher learning in the state of Kansas.[8][9] It had a record high enrollment of 24,766 students for the Fall 2014 semester.[5] Branch campuses are in Salina and Olathe. The Kansas
Kansas
State University Polytechnic Campus
Campus
in Salina is home to the College
College
of Technology
Technology
and Aviation
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Cartoon
A cartoon is a type of two-dimensional illustration, possibly animated. While the specific definition has changed over time, modern usage refers to (a) a typically non-realistic or semi-realistic artistic style of drawing or painting, (b) an image or series of images intended for satire, caricature, or humor, or (c) a motion picture that relies on a sequence of illustrations for its animation. An artist who creates cartoons is called a cartoonist.[1] The concept originated in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and first described a preparatory drawing for a piece of art, such as a painting, fresco, tapestry, or stained glass window
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