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Suklingphaa
Suklingphaa
Suklingphaa
(1795–1811), or Kamaleswar Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ কমলেশ্বৰ সিংহ), was a king of the Ahom kingdom. His reign witnessed the suppression of Moamoria rebellion and restoration of Ahom rule over Upper Assam. The Dundiya Revolution in Kamrup was also suppressed during his reign. In Nagaon, the Ahom army also managed to defeat a coalition of Moamoria rebels and the Kacharis of Kachari Kingdom. Since the monarch was very young, the administration of the kingdom was run by Purnananda Burhagohain, the Prime Minister of Ahom Kingdom, who was an able administrator and general
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Jaintia Kingdom
The Jaintia Kingdom
Jaintia Kingdom
was a kingdom in present-day North-East India. It was annexed by the British East India Company
British East India Company
in 1835.Contents1 Etymology 2 Extent 3 History3.1 British annexation4 Rulers 5 Notes 6 ReferencesEtymology[edit] One theory says that the word "Jaintia" is derived the shrine of Jayanti Devi or Jainteswari, an incarnation of the Hindu goddess Durga
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Kachari Kingdom
The Dimasa kingdom (Pron: kəˈʧɑ:rɪ) was a powerful kingdom on the Indian subcontinent, located in the region of Assam, India. The rulers belonged to the Dimasa ethnic group. The Dimasa kingdom and others (Kamata, Chutiya) that developed in the wake of the Kamarupa
Kamarupa
kingdom were led by chieftains of indigenous tribes and are examples of indigenous state formations in Medieval Assam. Remnants of the Dimasa kingdom lingered until the advent of the British, and this kingdom gave its name to two districts in Assam: Cachar
Cachar
and North Cachar
Cachar
Hills ( Dima Hasao
Dima Hasao
district). The origin of the Dimasa Kingdom is not clear.[1] According to tradition, Dimasas had to leave the Kamarupa
Kamarupa
Kingdom in the ancient period due to political turmoil
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Sukaphaa
Chaolung Sukaphaa
Sukaphaa
(r. 1228–1268), also Siu-Ka-Pha, the first Ahom king in medieval Assam, was the founder of the Ahom kingdom. A Tai prince originally from Mong Mao, (which is now included within the Dehong-Dai Singhpho Autonomous Prefecture of Yunnan
Yunnan
in Peoples Republic of China), the kingdom he established in 1228 existed for nearly six hundred years and in the process unified the various tribal and non-tribal peoples of the region that left a deep impact on the region
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Moamoria Rebellion
The Moamoria rebellion (1769–1805) was the 18th century conflict between the Moamorias, who were mainly Motok( Chutias and Morans) and Kachari adherents of the Moamara Sattra, and the Ahom kings. This led to widespread popular discontent against the Ahom king and the nobles and to two periods in which the Ahom king lost control of the capital. Retaking the capital was accompanied by a massacre of subjects, leading to a steep depopulation of large tracts. The Ahom king failed to retake the entire kingdom; a portion in the north-east, Bengmara, became virtually independent. The Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
emerged from the rebellion much weakened
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Nagaon District
Nagaon
Nagaon
(Assamese: নগাঁও জিলা Nôgãûw Zila) is an administrative district in the state of Assam
Assam
in India.Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 National protected area3 Economy 4 Demographics 5 Culture 6 Tourism 7 Flora and fauna 8 Sports 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Batadrowa gave birth to the Vaishnavite reformer Sankardeva, who brought about a Renaissance in Assamese society. Located in the very heartland of Assam, it falls directly at the center of the entire northeast of India
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Assamese Language
AncientDavaka KamarupaMedievalAhom Kingdom Chutiya Kingdom Kachari Kingdom Kamata Kingdom Baro-BhuyanColonialColonial Assam Assam
Assam
ProvincePeopleAhoms Assamese Brahmins Muslims Assamese Sikhs[7]Kalitas Kaibartas SutiyasTribes Bodos
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Burhagohain
Buragohain (Ahom language:Chao Phrang Mong) was the first of the two original counsellors in the Ahom kingdom. He was selected by the Ahom king from members of the Ahom nobility (Satgharia Ahom), who was not eligible for the position of Ahom kingship. The other original counsellor is the Borgohain. Both the positions existed from the time of the first Ahom king, Sukaphaa
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Assam
Assam
Assam
(English: /əˈsæm/, /-sɑːm/  listen (help·info)) is a state in Northeast India, situated south of the eastern Himalayas along the Brahmaputra
Brahmaputra
and Barak River
Barak River
valleys. Assam
Assam
covers an area of 78,438 km2 (30,285 sq mi)
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Calcutta
Kolkata
Kolkata
/koʊlˈkɑːtə/ (Bengali pronunciation: [kolkat̪a]), formerly Calcutta /kælˈkʌtə/ until 2001, is the capital of the Indian state
Indian state
of West Bengal. Located on the east bank of the Hooghly River, it is the principal commercial, cultural, and educational centre of East India, while the Port of Kolkata
Port of Kolkata
is India's oldest operating port and its sole major riverine port. The city is widely regarded as the "cultural capital" of India, and is also nicknamed the "City of Joy". In 2011, the city had a population of 4.5 million, while the population of the city and its suburbs was 14.1 million, making it the third-most populous metropolitan area in India
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Sunenphaa
Sunenphaa
Sunenphaa
(reign 1744–1751), or Pramatta Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ প্ৰমত্ত সিংহ), was the king of Ahom Kingdom
Ahom Kingdom
from 1744 – 1751 CE. He succeeded his elder brother Swargadeo Siva Singha, as the king of Ahom Kingdom. His reign of seven years was peaceful and prosperous. He constructed numerous buildings and temples
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Sudoiphaa
Sudoiphaa
Sudoiphaa
or Tej Singha was the king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
from 1677 CE to 1679 CE. After deposing king Sujinphaa, Atan Burhagohain, the Prime-Minister of Ahom Kingdom, installed Sudoiphaa
Sudoiphaa
in the throne. Sudoiphaa's reign witnessed the end of ministerial dictatorship of Atan Burhagohain and rise of Laluksola Borphukan, the Ahom Viceroy of Guwahati
Guwahati
and Lower Assam, as the real authority behind the throne
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Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
or Ratnadhwaj Singha was the king of the Ahom Kingdom
Ahom Kingdom
(now in northeast India) from 1679 CE to 1681 CE. He was only fourteen years of age when Laluksola Borphukan, the Ahom viceroy of Guwahati and Lower Assam, raised him to the throne, after deposing the former king, Sudoiphaa. Due to his youth at the time of his accession, he was generally known as Lora Raja or the Boy-king. His reign was characterized by the atrocities committed by Laluksola Borphukan, who held the real authority behind the throne. The most notorious act which occurred during his reign was the mutilation of Ahom princes belonging to the Royal Ahom Dynasty
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Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
or Supaatpha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ গদাধৰ সিংহ, reign 1681–1696[1]) established the rule of the Tungkhungia clan of the Ahom kings that ruled the Ahom kingdom till its climactic end. He was the son of Gobar Roja, a descendant of Suhungmung, and who had become the king for a mere 20 days. Previously known as Gadapani, Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
was able to stabilize the kingdom after the decade long turmoil following the Ahom victory in the Battle of Saraighat. This period saw the ruthless power grab of Debera Borbarua and Laluksola Borphukan's abandonment of Guwahati
Guwahati
and oppression via Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
Lora Roja. Gadadhar Singha retook Guwahati
Guwahati
from the Mughals for good, and established a strong rule of 'blood and iron'
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Sukhrungphaa
Sukhrungphaa
Sukhrungphaa
(reigned 1696–1714), or Swargadeu Rudra Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ ৰূদ্ৰ সিংহ Sorgodeu Rudro Xingho), was a Tungkhungia king of the Ahom kingdom under whom the kingdom reached its zenith of power and glory. Rudra Singha, known as Lai before he became the king, was the son of the previous Ahom king Gadadhar Singha. An illiterate (probably dyslexic), he is best known for building a coalition of rulers in the region and raising a vast composite army against the Mughal Empire. He died on the eve of his march west from Guwahati. His father had to escape persecution by the previous Ahom king and his mother, Joymoti Konwari, was killed in royal custody. He established his capital at Rangpur.Silver rupee of Sukhrungphaa. The legends read: obverse: sri srimat swarga deva rudra simhasya sake 1622 and reverse: sri sri hara gauri padambuja madhu karasya
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Sutanphaa
Sutanphaa
Sutanphaa
(or Siva Singha) (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ শিৱ সিংহ) (reign 1714–1744) was a King in Assam in the early 18th century.Contents1 Reign1.1 Dafla
Dafla
expedition 1.2 Bar Rajas 1.3 Administrative and public works 1.4 Death2 See also 3 ReferencesReign[edit] As per wish of Swargadeo Rudra Singha
Rudra Singha
from his deathbed, he was succeeded by his eldest son Siba Singha (reign 1714–1744). Siba Singha ascended the throne and assumed the Ahom name Sutanphaa. He gave up Rudra Singha's plan to organise a confederacy of the rajas of Hindustan and to invade Bengal, but obeyed his father's injunction to become a disciple of Krishnaram Bhattacharjya (Nyayavagish) the Shakta priest from near Nabadwip
Nabadwip
in West Bengal
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