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Subtraction
Subtraction
Subtraction
is an arithmetic operation that represents the operation of removing objects from a collection. It is signified by the minus sign (−). For example, in the adjacent picture, there are 5 − 2 apples—meaning 5 apples with 2 taken away, which is a total of 3 apples. Therefore, 5 − 2 = 3. Subtraction
Subtraction
represents removing or decreasing physical and abstract quantities using different kinds of objects including negative numbers, fractions, irrational numbers, vectors, decimals, functions, and matrices. Subtraction
Subtraction
follows several important patterns. It is anticommutative, meaning that changing the order changes the sign of the answer. It is not associative, meaning that when one subtracts more than two numbers, the order in which subtraction is performed matters. Subtraction
Subtraction
of 0 does not change a number
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Bordeaux
www.bordeaux.frUNESCO World Heritage SiteOfficial name Bordeaux, Port of the MoonCriteria Cultural: ii, ivReference 1256Inscription 2007 (31st Session)Area 1,731 haBuffer zone 11,974 ha1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Bordeaux
Bordeaux
(French pronunciation: ​[bɔʁdo]; Gascon Occitan: Bordèu) is a port city on the Garonne
Garonne
River in the Gironde
Gironde
department in southwestern France. The municipality (commune) of Bordeaux
Bordeaux
proper has a population of 246,586 (2014)
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1 (number)
1 (one, also called unit, unity, and (multiplicative) identity) is a number, numeral, and glyph. It represents a single entity, the unit of counting or measurement. For example, a line segment of unit length is a line segment of length 1
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Verb
A verb, from the Latin
Latin
verbum meaning word, is a word (part of speech) that in syntax conveys an action (bring, read, walk, run, learn), an occurrence (happen, become), or a state of being (be, exist, stand). In the usual description of English, the basic form, with or without the particle to, is the infinitive. In many languages, verbs are inflected (modified in form) to encode tense, aspect, mood, and voice. A verb may also agree with the person, gender or number of some of its arguments, such as its subject, or object
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Compound (linguistics)
In linguistics, a compound is a lexeme (less precisely, a word) that consists of more than one stem. Compounding, composition or nominal composition is the process of word formation that creates compound lexemes. That is, in familiar terms, compounding occurs when two or more words are joined to make one longer word. The meaning of the compound may be similar to or different from the meanings of its components in isolation. The component stems of a compound may be of the same part of speech—as in the case of the English word footpath, composed of the two nouns foot and path—or they may belong to different parts of speech, as in the case of the English word blackbird, composed of the adjective black and the noun bird. With very few exceptions, English compound words are stressed on their first component stem. The process occurs readily in other Germanic languages
Germanic languages
for different reasons
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Gerundive
In Latin grammar, a gerundive (/dʒəˈrʌndɪv/) is a verb form that functions as a verbal adjective. In Classical Latin, the gerundive is distinct in form and function from the gerund and the present active participle. In Late Latin, the differences were largely lost, resulting in a form derived from the gerund or gerundive but functioning more like a participle. The adjectival gerundive form survives in the formation of progressive aspect forms in Italian, Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese. In French the adjectival gerundive and participle forms merged completely, and the term gérondif is used for adverbial use of -ant forms.[1] There is no true equivalent to the gerundive in English; the closest translation is a passive to-infinitive non-finite clause such as books to be read. That reflects the most common use of the Latin gerundive, to combine a transitive verb (such as read) and its object (such as books), usually with a sense of obligation
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Affix
In linguistics, an affix is a morpheme that is attached to a word stem to form a new word or word form. Affixes may be derivational, like English -ness and pre-, or inflectional, like English plural -s and past tense -ed. They are bound morphemes by definition; prefixes and suffixes may be separable affixes. Affixations, the linguistic process speakers use form different words by adding morphemes (affixes) at the beginning (prefixation), the middle (infixation) or the end (suffixation) of words.Contents1 Positional categories of affixes 2 Lexical affixes 3 Orthographic affixes 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksPositional categories of affixes[edit] Affixes are divided into many categories, depending on their position with reference to the stem. Prefix
Prefix
and suffix are extremely common terms. Infix
Infix
and circumfix are less so, as they are not important in European languages
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Line Segment
In geometry, a line segment is a part of a line that is bounded by two distinct end points, and contains every point on the line between its endpoints. A closed line segment includes both endpoints, while an open line segment excludes both endpoints; a half-open line segment includes exactly one of the endpoints. Examples of line segments include the sides of a triangle or square. More generally, when both of the segment's end points are vertices of a polygon or polyhedron, the line segment is either an edge (of that polygon or polyhedron) if they are adjacent vertices, or otherwise a diagonal
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Length
In geometric measurements, length is the most extended dimension of an object.[1] In the International System of Quantities, length is any quantity with dimension distance. In other contexts, length is a measured dimension of an object. Length
Length
may be distinguished from height, which is vertical extent, and width or breadth, which are the distance from side to side, measuring across the object at right angles to the length. For example, it is possible to cut a length of wire shorter than the wire's width
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2 (number)
2 (two; /ˈtuː/ ( listen)) is a number, numeral, and glyph. It is the natural number following 1 and preceding 3.Contents1 In mathematics1.1 List of basic calculations2 Evolution of the glyph 3 In science 4 In technology 5 In religion5.1 Judaism6 Numerological significance 7 In sports 8 In other fields 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksIn mathematics[edit] An integer is called even if it is divisible by 2. For integers written in a numeral system based on an even number, such as decimal, hexadecimal, or in any other base that is even, divisibility by 2 is easily tested by merely looking at the last digit. If it is even, then the whole number is even. In particular, when written in the decimal system, all multiples of 2 will end in 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8. Two is the smallest prime number, and the only even prime number (for this reason it is sometimes called "the oddest prime").[1] The next prime is three
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Infix Notation
Infix
Infix
notation Prefix notation ("Polish")v t e Infix
Infix
notation is the notation commonly used in arithmetical and logical formulae and statements. It is characterized by the placement of operators between operands—"infixed operators"—such as the plus sign in 2 + 2.Contents1 Usage 2 Order of operations 3 Further notations 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksUsage[edit] Infix
Infix
notation is more difficult to parse by computers than prefix notation (e.g. + 2 2) or postfix notation (e.g. 2 2 +). However many programming languages use it due to its familiarity. It is more used in arithmetic, e.g. 5 × 6.[1] Order of operations[edit] In infix notation, unlike in prefix or postfix notations, parentheses surrounding groups of operands and operators are necessary to indicate the intended order in which operations are to be performed
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3 (number)
3 (three; /θriː/) is a number, numeral, and glyph. It is the natural number following 2 and preceding 4.Contents1 Evolution of the glyph1.1 Flat top 32 Mathematics2.1 Numeral systems 2.2 List of basic calculations3 Science3.1 Protoscience 3.2 Pseudoscience4 Philosophy 5 Religion5.1 Christianity 5.2 Judaism 5.3 Buddhism 5.4 Shinto 5.5 Daoism 5.6 Hinduism 5.7 Zoroastrianism 5.8 Norse mythology 5.9 Other religions 5.10 Esoteric tradition 5.11 As a lucky or unlucky number6 Sports 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEvolution of the glyph[edit]Three is the largest number still written with as many lines as the number represents. (The Ancient Romans usually wrote 4 as IIII, but this was almost entirely replaced by the subtractive notation IV in the Middle Ages.) To this day 3 is written as three lines in Roman and Chinese numerals. This was the way the Brahmin
Brahmin
Indians wrote it, and the Gupta made the three lines more curved
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Natural Number
In mathematics, the natural numbers are those used for counting (as in "there are six coins on the table") and ordering (as in "this is the third largest city in the country")
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Natural Numbers
In mathematics, the natural numbers are those used for counting (as in "there are six coins on the table") and ordering (as in "this is the third largest city in the country")
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Closure (mathematics)
A set has closure under an operation if performance of that operation on members of the set always produces a member of the same set; in this case we also say that the set is closed under the operation. For example, the positive integers are closed under addition, but not under subtraction: 1 − 2 displaystyle 1-2 is not a positive integer even though both 1 and 2 are positive integers
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