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Subset
In mathematics, especially in set theory, a set A is a subset of a set B, or equivalently B is a superset of A, if A is "contained" inside B, that is, all elements of A are also elements of B. A and B may coincide. The relationship of one set being a subset of another is called inclusion or sometimes containment
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Superset (other)
Superset
Superset
may refer to: Superset
Superset
in mathematics and set theory SuperSet Software, a group of friends who later became part of the early Novell Su
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Inequality (mathematics)
In mathematics, an inequality is a relation that holds between two values when they are different (see also: equality).The notation a ≠ b means that a is not equal to b.It does not say that one is greater than the other, or even that they can be compared in size.If the values in question are elements of an ordered set, such as the integers or the real numbers, they can be compared in size.The notation a < b means that a is less than b. The notation a > b means that a is greater than b.In either case, a is not equal to b. These relations are known as strict inequalities
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Mathematical Reviews
Mathematical Reviews is a journal published by the American Mathematical Society (AMS) that contains brief synopses, and in some cases evaluations, of many articles in mathematics, statistics, and theoretical computer science.[1][2] The AMS also publishes an associated online bibliographic database called MathSciNet which contains an electronic version of Mathematical Reviews and additionally contains citation information for almost 3 million papers.Contents1 Reviews 2 Online database 3 Mathematical citation quotient 4 Current Mathematical Publications 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksReviews[edit] Mathematical Reviews was founded by Otto E
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McGraw-Hill
McGraw-Hill Education
McGraw-Hill Education
(MHE) is a learning science company and one of the "big three" educational publishers[2][3] that provides customized educational content, software, and services for pre-K through postgraduate education
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Walter Rudin
Walter Rudin (May 2, 1921 – May 20, 2010)[2] was an Austrian-American mathematician and professor of Mathematics at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.[3] In addition to his contributions to complex and harmonic analysis, Rudin was known for his mathematical analysis textbooks: Principles of Mathematical Analysis,[4] Real and Complex Analysis,[5] and Functional Analysis[6] (informally referred to by students as "Baby Rudin", "Papa Rudin", and "Grandpa Rudin", respectively). Rudin wrote Principles of Mathematical Analysis only two years after obtaining his Ph.D. from Duke University
Duke University
while he was C. L. E
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Order Isomorphism
In the mathematical field of order theory an order isomorphism is a special kind of monotone function that constitutes a suitable notion of isomorphism for partially ordered sets (posets). Whenever two posets are order isomorphic, they can be considered to be "essentially the same" in the sense that one of the orders can be obtained from the other just by renaming of elements
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Isomorphic
In mathematics, an isomorphism (from the Ancient Greek: ἴσος isos "equal", and μορφή morphe "form" or "shape") is a homomorphism or morphism (i.e. a mathematical mapping) that admits an inverse.[note 1] Two mathematical objects are isomorphic if an isomorphism exists between them. An automorphism is an isomorphism whose source and target coincide
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Line (mathematics)
The notion of line or straight line was introduced by ancient mathematicians to represent straight objects (i.e., having no curvature) with negligible width and depth. Lines are an idealization of such objects. Until the 17th century, lines were defined in this manner: "The [straight or curved] line is the first species of quantity, which has only one dimension, namely length, without any width nor depth, and is nothing else than the flow or run of the point which […] will leave from its imaginary moving some vestige in length, exempt of any width
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Rational Number
In mathematics, a rational number is any number that can be expressed as the quotient or fraction p/q of two integers, a numerator p and a non-zero denominator q.[1] Since q may be equal to 1, every integer is a rational number. The set of all rational numbers, often referred to as "the rationals", the field of rationals or the field of rational numbers is usually denoted by a boldface Q (or blackboard bold Q displaystyle mathbb Q , Unicode ℚ);[2] it was thus denoted in 1895 by Giuseppe Peano
Giuseppe Peano
after quoziente, Italian for "quotient". The decimal expansion of a rational number always either terminates after a finite number of digits or begins to repeat the same finite sequence of digits over and over. Moreover, any repeating or terminating decimal represents a rational number. These statements hold true not just for base 10, but also for any other integer base (e.g
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Prime Number
A prime number (or a prime) is a natural number greater than 1 that cannot be formed by multiplying two smaller natural numbers. A natural number greater than 1 that is not prime is called a composite number. For example, 5 is prime because the only ways of writing it as a product, 1 × 5 or 5 × 1, involve 5 itself. However, 6 is composite because it is the product of two numbers (2 × 3) that are both smaller than 6. Primes are central in number theory because of the fundamental theorem of arithmetic: every natural number greater than 1 is either a prime itself or can be factorized as a product of primes that is unique up to their order. The property of being prime is called primality. A simple but slow method of checking the primality of a given number n displaystyle n , called trial division, tests whether n displaystyle n is a multiple of any integer between 2 and n displaystyle sqrt n
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Eric W. Weisstein
Eric Wolfgang Weisstein (born March 18, 1969) is an encyclopedist who created and maintains MathWorld and Eric Weisstein's World of Science (ScienceWorld). He is the author of the CRC Concise Encyclopedia of Mathematics. He currently works for Wolfram Research, Inc.Contents1 Education 2 Career2.1 Academic research 2.2 MathWorld, ScienceWorld
ScienceWorld
and Wolfram Research 2.3 Further scientific activities3 Footnotes 4 References 5 External linksEducation[edit] Weisstein holds a Ph.D. in planetary astronomy which he obtained from the California Institute of Technology's (Caltech) Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences in 1996 as well as an M.S. in planetary astronomy in 1993 also from Caltech. Weisstein graduated Cum Laude from Cornell University
Cornell University
with a B.A. in physics and a minor in astronomy in 1990
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MathWorld
MathWorld is an online mathematics reference work, created and largely written by Eric W. Weisstein. It is sponsored by and licensed to Wolfram Research, Inc.
Wolfram Research, Inc.
and was partially funded by the National Science Foundation's National Science Digital Library grant to the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.Contents1 History 2 CRC lawsuit 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Eric W. Weisstein, the creator of the site, was a physics and astronomy student who got into the habit of writing notes on his mathematical readings. In 1995 he put his notes online and called it "Eric's Treasure Trove of Mathematics." It contained hundreds of pages/articles, covering a wide range of mathematical topics. The site became popular as an extensive single resource on mathematics on the web. Weisstein continuously improved the notes and accepted corrections and comments from online readers
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Boolean Algebra (structure)
In abstract algebra, a Boolean algebra
Boolean algebra
or Boolean lattice is a complemented distributive lattice. This type of algebraic structure captures essential properties of both set operations and logic operations. A Boolean algebra
Boolean algebra
can be seen as a generalization of a power set algebra or a field of sets, or its elements can be viewed as generalized truth values. It is also a special case of a De Morgan algebra and a Kleene algebra (with involution). Every Boolean algebra
Boolean algebra
gives rise to a Boolean ring, and vice versa, with ring multiplication corresponding to conjunction or meet ∧, and ring addition to exclusive disjunction or symmetric difference (not disjunction ∨)
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