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Stroudwater Canal
The Stroudwater Navigation
Stroudwater Navigation
is a canal which linked Stroud to the Severn Estuary
Severn Estuary
in England and Wales. It was authorised in 1776, although part had already been built, as the proprietors believed that an Act of Parliament
Act of Parliament
obtained in 1730 gave them the necessary powers. Opened in 1779, it was a commercial success, its main cargo being coal. It was 8 miles (13 km) in length and had a rise of 102 feet 5 inches (31.22 m) through 12 locks.[1] Following the opening of the Thames and Severn Canal
Thames and Severn Canal
in 1789, it formed part of a through route from Bristol
Bristol
to London, although much of its trade vanished when the Kennet and Avon Canal
Canal
provided a more direct route in 1810
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Beam (nautical)
The beam of a ship is its width at the widest point as measured at the ship's nominal waterline. The beam is a bearing projected at right-angles from the fore and aft line, outwards from the widest part of ship
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Cutter (boat)
A cutter is typically a small, but in some cases a medium-sized, watercraft designed for speed rather than for capacity.[1][2] Traditionally a cutter sailing vessel is a small single-masted boat, fore-and-aft rigged, with two or more headsails and often a bowsprit. The cutter's mast may be set farther back than on a sloop.[3] In modern usage, a cutter can be either a small- or medium-sized vessel whose occupants exercise official authority. Examples are harbor pilots' cutters and cutters of the U.S. Coast Guard[4] or UK Border Force. Cutters can also be a small boat serving a larger one to ferry passengers or light stores between larger boats and the shore. This type of cutter may be powered by oars, sails or a motor.[clarification needed]Contents1 Sailing 2 Rowing 3 Pulling 4 Naval cutter 5 Pilot cutter 6 Customs services 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksSailing[edit]French cutterThe cutter is one of several types of sailboats
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Droitwich Canal
The Droitwich Canal is a synthesis of two canals in Worcestershire, England; the Droitwich Barge Canal and the Droitwich Junction Canal. The Barge Canal is a broad canal which opened in 1771 linking Droitwich Spa to the River Severn at Hawford Mill, Claines. The Droitwich Junction Canal is a narrow canal, opened in 1854, which linked Droitwich to the Worcester and Birmingham Canal. Both were built to carry salt, and were abandoned in 1939. They have been the subject of a restoration plan since 1973, and the Barge Canal was officially reopened in 2010, while the Junction Canal reopened in July 2011. Following the opening of the canal, ownership transferred to the newly created Canal and River TrustContents1 History1.1 Operation 1.2 Decline2 Restoration 3 Points of interest 4 See also 5 Bibliography5.1 References6 External linksHistory[edit] Droitwich has been an important centre for the production of salt, obtained from natural brine springs, since before Roman times
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Assizes
The courts of assize, or assizes (/əˈsaɪzɪz/), were periodic courts held around England and Wales
England and Wales
until 1972, when together with the quarter sessions they were abolished by the Courts Act 1971
Courts Act 1971
and replaced by a single permanent Crown Court
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Coventry Canal
The Coventry
Coventry
Canal
Canal
is a navigable narrow canal in the Midlands of England. It starts in Coventry
Coventry
and ends 38 miles (65 km) north at Fradley Junction, just north of Lichfield, where it joins the Trent and Mersey Canal.[1] It also has connections with the Oxford
Oxford
Canal, the Ashby Canal, and the Birmingham and Fazeley Canal. Some maps show the canal as a northern and a southern section, connected by a stretch of the Birmingham and Fazeley Canal, but others, including the Canal
Canal
and River Trust show the through route as the Coventry
Coventry
Canal
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Trow
A trow was a type of cargo boat found in the past on the rivers Severn and Wye in Great Britain
Great Britain
and used to transport goods.Contents1 Features 2 Types 3 Pronunciation 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksFeatures[edit] The mast could be taken down so that the trow could go under bridges, such as the bridge at Worcester
Worcester
and the many bridges up and downstream. The mast was stepped in a three sided frame open at the rear but closed with an iron pin or rope lashing. From the top of the mast a forestay ran down to the bow winch. To lower the mast the pin was removed and the winch slackened off to let the mast fall towards the stern. The reverse operation pulled the mast up. Despite their flat-bottomed hull form which made volume available for their load and permitted drying out on muddy banks in the tidal area where they operated, Trows were seaworthy
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Towpath
A towpath is a road or trail on the bank of a river, canal, or other inland waterway. The purpose of a towpath is to allow a land vehicle, beasts of burden, or a team of human pullers to tow a boat, often a barge. This mode of transport was common where sailing was impractical due to tunnels and bridges, unfavourable winds, or the narrowness of the channel. After the Industrial Revolution, towing became obsolete when engines were fitted on boats and when railway transportation superseded the slow towing method. Since then, many of these towpaths have been converted to multi-use trails
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Capstan (nautical)
A capstan is a vertical-axled rotating machine developed for use on sailing ships to multiply the pulling force of seamen when hauling ropes, cables, and hawsers. The principle is similar to that of the windlass, which has a horizontal axle.Contents1 History1.1 Early form 1.2 Later form 1.3 Modern form2 Similar machines 3 Use on land 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The word, connected with the Old French
Old French
capestan or cabestan(t), from Old Provençal cabestan, from capestre "pulley cord," from Latin capistrum, -a halter, from capere, to take hold of, seems to have come into English (14th century) from Portuguese or Spanish shipmen at the time of the Crusades.[1] Both device and word are considered Spanish inventions.[2] Early form[edit]A capstan on a sailing ship
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Lechlade
Lechlade, or Lechlade-on-Thames, is a town at the southern edge of the Cotswolds
Cotswolds
in Gloucestershire, England. It is the highest point at which the River Thames
River Thames
is navigable, although there is a right of navigation that continues south-west into Cricklade, situated in the neighbouring county of Wiltshire. The town is named after the River Leach that joins the Thames near The Trout Inn.Contents1 Description 2 Governance 3 The River Thames 4 Youth facilities 5 Notable people 6 Location 7 References 8 External linksDescription[edit] The town is a popular venue for tourism and river-based activities. There are several pubs, some antique shops, a convenience store, food outlets, a garden centre and a Christmas shop. Near the 15th century Church of England
England
parish church of Saint Lawrence, in the centre of the town, there is a large open space which is now a car park
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Forest Of Dean
The Forest of Dean
Forest of Dean
is a geographical, historical and cultural region in the western part of the county of Gloucestershire, England. It forms a roughly triangular plateau bounded by the River Wye
River Wye
to the west and northwest, Herefordshire
Herefordshire
to the north, the River Severn
River Severn
to the south, and the City of Gloucester
Gloucester
to the east. The area is characterised by more than 110 square kilometres (42 sq mi) of mixed woodland, one of the surviving ancient woodlands in England. A large area was reserved for royal hunting before 1066, and remained as the second largest crown forest in England, the largest being New Forest
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Ketch
A ketch is a two-masted sailing craft whose mainmast is taller than the mizzen mast (or aft-mast). The name "ketch" is derived from "catch" or fishing boat.[1][2] Historically the ketch was a northern European square-rigged vessel, often a freighter or fishing boat, particularly in the Baltic and North seas. Nowadays, a ketch tends to be a fore-and-aft rigged pleasure yacht, similar to a yawl; but a ketch's mizzen mast is taller and its mizzen sail is larger than a yawl's.Contents1 Varieties of modern ketch 2 Similar rigs2.1 Historical 2.2 Modern3 History 4 Popular culture 5 See also 6 ReferencesVarieties of modern ketch[edit]A wishbone ketch with a huge genoa foresail.A gaff ketch with conventional main topsail & lug-rigged mizzen topsailThe large fore-and-aft sail on the mainmast is the mainsail, while the sail on the mizzen mast is the mizzen
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Sloop
A sloop (from Dutch sloep, in turn from French chaloupe) is a sailing boat with a single mast and a fore-and-aft rig. A sloop has only one head-sail; if a vessel has two or more head-sails, the term cutter is used, and its mast may be set further aft than on a sloop. The most common rig of modern sailboats is the Bermuda-rigged sloop. Typically, a modern sloop carries a mainsail on a boom aft of the mast, with a single loose-footed head-sail (a jib or a genoa) forward of the mast.Contents1 Masthead vs. fractional rigging 2 Rationale behind the sloop rig 3 Sails carried3.1 The Bermuda
Bermuda
sloop 3.2 Jamaican sloop 3.3 Historic naval definition 3.4 Modern naval definition 3.5 Modern civilian connotation4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksMasthead vs. fractional rigging[edit]A masthead-rigged UFO 34Sloops are either masthead-rigged or fractional-rigged
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Thomas Dadford, Jr.
Thomas Dadford Jr. (ca. 1761 to 1801) was an English canal engineer, who came from a family of canal engineers. He first worked with his father in the north of Britain on the Stour and the Trent, but later independently, contributing to a number of canal schemes, mainly in Monmouthshire and Glamorganshire but also in Montgomeryshire and Ellesmere, before dying at the young age of 40.Contents1 Family history 2 Working history 3 Achievements 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingFamily history[edit] Thomas Dadford was born in Britain around 1761, the first son of Thomas Dadford Sr. and Frances Brown, who are believed to have been living in Wolverhampton
Wolverhampton
at the time. His father was a canal engineer, and his brothers John Dadford and James Dadford also worked in this field
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Gloucester And Berkeley Canal
The Gloucester and Sharpness Canal or Gloucester and Berkeley Canal is a canal in the west of England, between Gloucester and Sharpness; for much of its length it runs close to the tidal River Severn, but cuts off a significant loop in the river, at a once-dangerous bend near Arlingham. It was once the broadest and deepest canal in the world. The canal is 26.5km[1] (16.5 miles) long.Contents1 18th-century conception 2 Decade of capital raising 3 Eventual completion 4 Eventual dividends 5 Early 20th century 6 The Purton Hulks 7 Recent history 8 See also 9 References9.1 Bibliography10 External links18th-century conception[edit] Conceived in the Canal Mania period of the late 18th century, the Gloucester and Berkeley Ship Canal scheme (as it was originally named) was started by architect and civil engineer Robert Mylne
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Shrewsbury
Shrewsbury
Shrewsbury
(/ˈʃroʊzbri/ ( listen) SHROHZ-bree or /ˈʃruːzbri/ ( listen) SHROOZ-bree[3][4]) is the county town of Shropshire, England
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