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Lucien N. Andriot
Lucien Andriot ASC[1] (1892–1979) was a prolific French-American cinematographer. He shot more than 200 films and television programs over the course of his career. Born in Paris, Andriot began his career in France in 1909 working for Victorin-Hippolyte Jasset. His elder sister Josette Andriot was a French film actress, working for Jasset. He then came to the U.S. some time before 1914 as an employee of the Éclair American Company based in Fort Lee, New Jersey.[2][3] The outbreak of World War I drove a re-organization of foreign film-industry assets in Fort Lee, including the employees. Now working for the World Film Company, financed by Lewis J. Selznick and run by William A. Brady, Andriot became a member of a separate French-speaking unit within World Film
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Drama Film

In film and television, drama is a category of narrative fiction (or semi-fiction) intended to be more serious than humorous in tone.[1] Drama of this kind is usually qualified with additional terms that specify its particular super-genre, macro-genre, or micro-genre,[2] such as soap opera (operatic drama), police crime drama, political drama, legal drama, historical drama, domestic drama, teen drama, and comedy-drama (dramedy)
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War Correspondent (film)
War Correspondent is a 1932 American drama film directed by Paul Sloane. [1] The film stars Jack Holt, Ralph Graves and Lila Lee.[2] Although set in war-torn China, War Correspondent was entirely shot in California.[3]Outside of Shanghai, famous war correspondent Franklyn Bennett (Ralph Graves), part of an unofficial branch of the U.S. military, broadcasts over the radio an eyewitness report of an air battle won by China's ace, "General Ching," flying for the nationalist forces of Wu Sun (Victor Wong). "General Ching" is Jim Kenyon ( Jack Holt), a cynical American soldier of fortune
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Half Shot At Sunrise

Half Shot at Sunrise is a 1930 American comedy film starring the comedy duo Wheeler & Woolsey and Dorothy Lee. Their fourth film together, it was the second starring vehicle for the two, following the success of The Cuckoos, which had been released earlier in 1930. Directed by Paul Sloane, from a screenplay by Anne Caldwell, James Ashmore Creelman, Ralph Spence, and Fatty Arbuckle, which had been tailored to highlight the comedic talents of Wheeler and Woolsey.

During World War I, two American Doughboys, Tommy Turner and Gilbert Simpson, are more interested in picking up girls than in military duty. In Paris, they go AWOL in order to follow their libertine pursuits. They alternate between impersonating officers in order to impress the ladies, and avoiding being found out by the military police
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The Cuckoos (1930 Film)

Professor Bird (Woolsey) and his partner, Sparrow (Wheeler), are a pair of charlatan fortune tellers who are bankrupt and stranded at a Mexican resort just south of the border. An heiress, Ruth Chester (June Clyde), appears, who is running away from her aunt, Fanny Furst (Jobyna Howland). She is in love with an American pilot, Billy Shannon (Hugh Trevor), but her aunt wishes her to marry the European nobleman, The Baron (Ivan Lebedeff), whom the aunt believes is the "right" type of person for her niece. Sparrow, meanwhile has fallen in love with a young American girl, Anita (Dorothy Lee), who has been living with a band of Gypsies. This creates an issue, since the leader of the Gypsy band, Julius (Mitchell Lewis), has had his eye on Anita for years. When Fannie Furst arrives, she attempts to persuade Ruth into marrying the Baron, but unbeknownst by Fannie, The Baron is only interested in marrying Ruth for her money
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