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Stocking Frame
A stocking frame was a mechanical knitting machine used in the textiles industry. It was invented by William Lee of Calverton near Nottingham
Nottingham
in 1589. Its use, known traditionally as framework knitting, was the first major stage in the mechanisation of the textile industry, and played an important part in the early history of the Industrial Revolution. It was adapted to knit cotton and to do ribbing, and by 1800 had been adapted as a lace making machine.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Development 4 Influence on the Industrial Revolution 5 Derby
Derby
Rib machine 6 Lace
Lace
making 7 Postscript 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksDescription[edit]Six stages in the knitting machine cycleLee's machine consisted of a stout wooden frame. It did straight knitting, not tubular knitting
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Gloucester
Gloucester
Gloucester
(/ˈɡlɒstər/ ( listen)) is a city and district in southwest England, the county city of Gloucestershire. Gloucester lies close to the Welsh border, on the River Severn, between the Cotswolds
Cotswolds
to the east and the Forest of Dean
Forest of Dean
to the southwest. Gloucester
Gloucester
was founded in AD 97 by the Romans under Emperor Nerva
Nerva
as Colonia Glevum
Glevum
Nervensis, and was granted its first charter in 1155 by King Henry II
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Wool
Wool
Wool
is the textile fiber obtained from sheep and other animals, including cashmere and mohair from goats, qiviut from muskoxen, angora from rabbits, and other types of wool from camelids.[1] Wool
Wool
mainly consists of protein together with a few percent lipids. In this regard it is chemically quite distinct from the more dominant textile, cotton, which is mainly cellulose.[1]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Processing2.1 Shearing 2.2 Scouring3 Fineness and yield 4 History 5 Production 6 Marketing6.1 Australia 6.2 Other countries7 Yarn 8 Uses 9 Events 10 See also10.1 Production 10.2 Processing 10.3 Refined products 10.4 Organizations 10.5 Miscellaneous wool11 References 12 External linksCharacteristics[edit]Champion hogget fleece, Walcha Show Wool
Wool
is produced by follicles which are small cells located in the skin
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Milford, Derbyshire
Milford is a village in Derbyshire, England, on the River Derwent, between Duffield and Belper
Belper
on the A6 trunk road. Until the end of the 18th century it was no more than a few houses near the point, about a quarter of a mile further south, where a Roman road from the Wirksworth
Wirksworth
lead mines forded the river. The road still exists as it passes across the Chevin hill and descends into the village by what is now Sunny Hill. It is thought to have then proceeded along the east bank of the river to the Roman garrison of Derventio, in what is now Derby
Derby
where it connected with Rykneld Street.[1] However, next to it was Makeney where, in 1554, Burchard Kranich
Burchard Kranich
built the first Smeltmill[2] for extracting lead from its ore
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Water Frame
A water frame is a water-powered spinning frame designed for the production of cotton thread, first used in 1768. It was able to spin 128 threads at a time, which was an easier and faster method than ever before. It was developed by Richard Arkwright, who patented the technology in 1767.[1] The design was partly based on a spinning machine built for Thomas Highs
Thomas Highs
by clock maker John Kay, who was hired by Arkwright.[2] Being run on water power, it produced stronger and harder yarn than the then famous 'Spinning Jenny', thus, greatly ushering the factory system.Contents1 Principle of operation 2 Cromford 3 References 4 External linksPrinciple of operation[edit] The water frame is the name given to a spinning frame when water power is used to drive it. Both are credited to Richard Arkwright, who patented the technology in 1768
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Cromford
Cromford
Cromford
is a village and civil parish, two miles to the south of Matlock in the Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Dales district in Derbyshire, England. The population at the 2011 Census was 1,433.[1] It is principally known for its historical connection with Richard Arkwright, and the nearby Cromford Mill
Cromford Mill
which he built outside the village in 1771. Cromford
Cromford
is in the Derwent Valley Mills
Derwent Valley Mills
World Heritage site.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Cultural references 4 Governance 5 Landmarks 6 Notable residents 7 Gallery 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksGeography[edit] The River Derwent, with its sources on Bleaklow
Bleaklow
in the Dark Peak, flows southward to Derby
Derby
and then to the River Trent
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Richard Arkwright
Sir Richard Arkwright
Richard Arkwright
(23 December 1732 – 3 August 1792) was an English inventor and a leading entrepreneur during the early Industrial Revolution. Although his patents were eventually overturned, he is credited with inventing the spinning frame, which following the transition to water power was renamed the water frame. He also patented a rotary carding engine that transformed raw cotton into cotton lap. Arkwright's achievement was to combine power, machinery, semi-skilled labour and the new raw material of cotton to create mass-produced yarn. His skills of organization made him, more than anyone else, the creator of the modern factory system, especially in his mill at Cromford, Derbyshire, now preserved as part of the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site
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James Thompson (journalist)
James Thompson (1817–1877) of Leicester
Leicester
was an English journalist and local historian. Life[edit] James, son of Thomas Thompson, proprietor of the Leicester
Leicester
Chronicle, by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of John Garton of Halstead, Leicestershire, was born at Leicester
Leicester
on 6 December 1817. He received his education first at a school kept by Mr. Creaton of Billesdon, and then under Charles Berry, minister of the Great Meeting at Leicester. He followed his father's profession of journalist, as a reporter, and then assisting in the editorial department
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Fustian
Fustian
Fustian
is a variety of heavy cloth woven from cotton, chiefly prepared for menswear. It is also used figuratively to refer to pompous, inflated or pretentious writing or speech, from at least the time of Shakespeare
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Lancashire
Lancashire
Lancashire
(/ˈlæŋkəʃər/ LANG-kə-shər, /-ʃɪər/ -sheer or, locally, [ˈɫaŋkɪʃə(ɻ)];[2] abbreviated Lancs.) is a county in north west England. The county town is Lancaster although the administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire
Lancashire
are known as Lancastrians. The history of Lancashire
Lancashire
begins with its founding in the 12th century. In the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086, some of its lands were treated as part of Yorkshire. The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey, Inter Ripam et Mersam, was included in the returns for Cheshire
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India
India, officially the Republic
Republic
of India
India
(IAST: Bhārat Gaṇarājya),[e] is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country (with over 1.2 billion people), and the most populous democracy in the world. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
on the southeast. It shares land borders with Pakistan
Pakistan
to the west;[f] China, Nepal, and Bhutan
Bhutan
to the northeast; and Myanmar
Myanmar
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India
India
is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and the Maldives
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Leicester
Coordinates: 52°38′N 1°8′W / 52.633°N 1.133°W / 52.633; -1.133LeicesterFlagCoat of armsMotto(s): "Semper Eadem" Constant / Always the Same / "'the Eternal Urbs'" Location within Leicestershire
Leicestershire
and EnglandLeicesterLocation of Leicester
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Cotton
Cotton
Cotton
is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium
Gossypium
in the mallow family Malvaceae. The fiber is almost pure cellulose. Under natural conditions, the cotton bolls will increase the dispersal of the seeds. The plant is a shrub native to tropical and subtropical regions around the world, including the Americas, Africa, and India. The greatest diversity of wild cotton species is found in Mexico, followed by Australia
Australia
and Africa.[1] Cotton
Cotton
was independently domesticated in the Old and New Worlds. The fiber is most often spun into yarn or thread and used to make a soft, breathable textile
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Worshipful Company Of Framework Knitters
The Worshipful Company of Framework Knitters is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. It was incorporated by Oliver Cromwell in 1657 (reissued as a Royal Charter in 1663)[1] and was granted livery status in 1713. Unlike many other companies, the Framework Knitters' Company has retained close connections to its original trade, most members of the company being involved with the craft. The company does not, however, function only as a trade association of knitters, also supporting various charities. The Framework Knitters' Company ranks sixty-fourth in the order of precedence for Livery Companies
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Spitalfields
Spitalfields
Spitalfields
/ˈspɪtəlfiːldz/ is an inner city district and former parish in the East End of London, Central London
Central London
in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets and is near Liverpool Street station
Liverpool Street station
and Brick Lane. The Liberty of Norton Folgate
Liberty of Norton Folgate
and the neighbouring Liberty of the Old Artillery Ground were merged into Spitalfields
Spitalfields
in 1921. The area straddles Commercial Street and is home to several markets, including the historic Old Spitalfields
Spitalfields
Market, Brick Lane
Brick Lane
Market and Cheshire Street
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