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Stock Phrase
A cliché or cliche (/ˈkliːʃeɪ/ or /klɪˈʃeɪ/) is an expression, idea, or element of an artistic work which has become overused to the point of losing its original meaning or effect, even to the point of being trite or irritating, especially when at some earlier time it was considered meaningful or novel.[1] In phraseology, the term has taken on a more technical meaning, referring to an expression imposed by conventionalized linguistic usage
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Cliché (other)
Cliché
Cliché
is an adjective denoting overuse. Cliché
Cliché
may also refer to:Contents1 In arts and entertainmen
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Robert W. Bly
Robert W. Bly (born July 21, 1957) is an American writer on the subjects of copywriting, freelance writing, and other marketing/writing subjects
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Kitsch
Kitsch
Kitsch
(/kɪtʃ/; loanword from German), also called cheesiness or tackiness, is art or other objects that appeal to popular rather than high art tastes. Such objects are sometimes appreciated in a knowingly ironic or humorous way.[1][2][3] The word was first applied to artwork that was a response to certain divisions of 19th-century art with aesthetics that favored what later art critics would consider to be exaggerated sentimentality and melodrama. Hence, 'kitsch art' is closely associated with 'sentimental art'. Kitsch
Kitsch
is also related to the concept of camp, because of its humorous and ironic nature. To brand visual art as "kitsch" is generally pejorative, as it implies that the work in question is gaudy, or that it serves a solely ornamental and decorative purpose rather than amounting to a work of true artistic merit
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List Of Film And Television Clichés
The following is a list of clichés found to occur frequently in films and television series. Clichés are recurring ideas in fiction and have been considered to have been overused in cinematic and televised media.[1] Clichés are present throughout the action, horror, and romance genres, among others.Contents1 Examples by genre1.1 Primarily action 1.2 Primarily horror 1.3 Primarily romance 1.4 Primarily sports 1.5 Primarily Western 1.6 Miscellaneous2 See also 3 References 4 External linksExamples by genre[edit] This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries. Primarily action[edit]Description Examples Ref.A chase scene, be it running on foot or a car chase often on top of trains
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Meme
A meme (/miːm/ MEEM[1][2][3]) is an idea, behavior, or style that spreads from person to person within a culture—often with the aim of conveying a particular phenomenon, theme, or meaning represented by the meme.[4] A meme acts as a unit for carrying cultural ideas, symbols, or practices, that can be transmitted from one mind to another through writing, speech, gestures, rituals, or other imitable phenomena with a mimicked theme. Supporters of the concept regard memes as cultural analogues to genes in that they self-replicate, mutate, and respond to selective pressures.[5] Proponents theorize that memes are a viral phenomenon that may evolve by natural selection in a manner analogous to that of biological evolution. Memes do this through the processes of variation, mutation, competition, and inheritance, each of which influences a meme's reproductive success. Memes spread through the behavior that they generate in their hosts
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Platitude
A platitude is a trite, meaningless, or prosaic statement, generally directed at quelling social, emotional, or cognitive unease. Platitudes are geared towards presenting a shallow, unifying wisdom over a difficult topic. However, they are too general and overused to be anything more than undirected statements with ultimately little meaningful contribution towards a solution. Examples could be statements such as "it is what it is", "meet in the middle", "busy as a bee", "method to my madness", "better late than never", "just be yourself", "burning the midnight oil", "strength is something you choose", “thoughts and prayers”, and "nobody's perfect". Platitudes are generally a form of thought-terminating cliché.Contents1 Etymology 2 See also 3 References 4 SourcesEtymology[edit] The word is a borrowing from the French compound platitude, from plat 'flat' + -(i)tude '-ness', thus 'flatness'
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Siamese Twins (linguistics)
Siamese twins (also irreversible binomials,[1] binomials,[1] binomial pairs, nonreversible word pairs,[2] or freezes) in the context of the English language
English language
refer to a pair or group of words used together as an idiomatic expression or collocation, usually conjoined by the words and or or. The order of elements cannot be reversed.[1] The expressions milk and honey (two nouns), short and sweet (two adjectives), and do or die (two verbs) are various examples of Siamese twins. Many Siamese twins are "catchy" (and thus clichés and catchphrases) due to alliteration, rhyming, or their ubiquity in society and culture. Word combinations like rock and roll, the birds and the bees, mix and match, and wear and tear have become so widely used that their meanings surpass the meaning of the constituent words and are thus inseparable and permanent parts of the English lexicon; the former two are idioms, whilst the latter two are collocations
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Slogan
A slogan is a memorable motto or phrase used in a clan, political, commercial, religious, and other context as a repetitive expression of an idea or purpose, with the goal of persuading members of the public or a more defined target group. The Oxford Dictionary of English defines a slogan as "a short and striking or memorable phrase used in advertising."[1] (Stevenson, 2010) A slogan usually has the attributes of being memorable, very concise and appealing to the audience.[2] (Lim & Loi, 2015). These attributes are necessary in a slogan, as it is only a short phrase
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Snowclone
A snowclone is a cliché and phrasal template that can be used and recognized in multiple variants. The term was coined as a neologism in 2004, derived from journalistic clichés that referred to the number of Eskimo words for snow.[1]Contents1 History and derivation 2 Notable examples2.1 Eskimo words for snow 2.2 In space, no one can X 2.3 X is the new Y 2.4 The mother of all X 2.5 X while Y 2.6 To X or not to X 2.7 Have X, will travel3 Similar concepts3.1 X-gate and similar suffixes4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory and derivation[edit] The linguistic phenomenon of "a multi-use, customizable, instantly recognizable, time-worn, quoted or misquoted phrase or sentence that can be used in an entirely open array of different variants" was originally described by linguist Geoffrey K
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Speech
Speech
Speech
is the vocalized form of communication used by humans and some animals, which is based upon the syntactic combination of items drawn from the lexicon. Each spoken word is created out of the phonetic combination of a limited set of vowel and consonant speech sound units (phonemes). These vocabularies, the syntax that structures them, and their sets of speech sound units differ, creating many thousands of different, and mutually unintelligible, human languages. The vocal abilities that enable humans to produce speech also enable them to sing. A gestural form of human communication exists for the deaf in the form of sign language. Speech
Speech
in some cultures has become the basis of written language, often one that differs in its vocabulary, syntax and phonetics from its associated spoken one, a situation called diglossia
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Stock Character
A stock character is a stereotypical fictional character in a work of art such as a novel, play, or film, whom audiences recognize from frequent recurrences in a particular literary tradition. Stock characters are archetypal characters distinguished by their flatness. As a result, they tend to be easy targets for parody and to be criticized as clichés. The presence of a particular array of stock characters is a key component of many genres. The point of the stock character is to move the story along by allowing the audience to already understand the character.[1][2]Contents1 Examples and history1.1 Ancient Greece1.1.1 New Comedy 1.1.2 Mimistry1.2 Roman input1.2.1 Plautus 1.2.2 Laertius 1.2.3 Supersession by philosophy1.3 Other countries2 Academic analysis 3 Copyright
Copyright
law 4 See also 5 ReferencesExamples and history[edit]This section possibly contains original research
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Gary Blake
Dr. Gary Blake (born July 25, 1944) is a writer on the subject of humor, writing, and teaching. He is also the director of The Communication Workshop, a company dedicated to helping business and technical professionals improve their writing.[1][2][3] He is a prolific author in the field of technical writing and is often invited to give workshops to Fortune 500
Fortune 500
companies.[4] Biography[edit] Blake grew up in Bronxville, New York. He got a B.S. degree in Speech and Theater in 1966 from the University of Wisconsin and a M.S. a year later. Blake received a PhD from City University of New York in 1973.[5] While teaching at Hunter College in New York and Baruch College, Blake wrote his first book, The Status Book (1978)[6] and began writing for Travel and Leisure, Glamour, Family Circle and other magazines. Blake has presented writing seminars at more than 250 organizations in the US, UK, Bermuda, and Canada
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Figure Of Speech
A figure of speech or rhetorical figure[1] is figurative language in the form of a single word or phrase. It can be a special repetition, arrangement or omission of words with literal meaning, or a phrase with a specialized meaning not based on the literal meaning of the words.[dubious – discuss] Figures of speech often provide emphasis, freshness of expression, or clarity
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Macmillan Publishers (United States)
Macmillan Publishers
Macmillan Publishers
USA was the former name of a now mostly defunct American publishing company. Once the American division of the British Macmillan Publishers, remnants of the original American Macmillan are present in McGraw-Hill Education's Macmillan/McGraw-Hill textbooks and Gale's Macmillan Reference USA
Macmillan Reference USA
division. The German publisher Holtzbrinck, which bought Macmillan UK in 1999, purchased most US rights to the name in 2001 and rebranded its American division with it in 2007.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Brett family 1.2 Mergers and end 1.3 Holtzbrinck2 Authors 3 Publishers 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingHistory[edit] Brett family[edit] George Edward Brett opened the first Macmillan office in the United States in 1869 and Macmillan sold its U.S
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