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Stock Phrase
A CLICHé or CLICHE (/ˈkliːʃeɪ/ or /klɪˈʃeɪ/ ) is an expression, idea, or element of an artistic work which has become overused to the point of losing its original meaning or effect, even to the point of being trite or irritating, especially when at some earlier time it was considered meaningful or novel. In phraseology , the term has taken on a more technical meaning, referring to an expression imposed by conventionalized linguistic usage . The term is frequently used in modern culture for an action or idea that is expected or predictable, based on a prior event. Typically pejorative, "clichés" may or may not be true. Some are stereotypes , but some are simply truisms and facts . Clichés often are employed for comic effect, typically in fiction. Most phrases now considered clichéd originally were regarded as striking, but have lost their force through overuse
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Bromide (language)
Bromide in literary usage means a phrase, cliché, or platitude that is trite or unoriginal. It can be intended to soothe or placate; it can suggest insincerity or a lack of originality in the speaker. When hypostatized and embodied, in which the concept becomes a person, bromide can mean a commonplace or tiresome person, a bore. A now outdated usage of bromide is a photographic print, stemming from the use of silver bromide in photographic films, emulsions and papers. Its original usage was as a chemical term, referring to bromine salts. ETYMOLOGYBromide has both literal and figurative meanings. The word originally derives from chemistry in which it can be used to describe a compound containing the element bromine , especially as a salt or bonded to an alkyl radical
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Archetype
The concept of an ARCHETYPE /ˈɑːrkɪtaɪp/ appears in areas relating to behavior , modern psychological theory , and literary analysis . An archetype can be: * a statement, pattern of behavior, or prototype (model) which other statements, patterns of behavior, and objects copy or emulate. (Frequently used informal synonyms for this usage include "standard example", "basic example", and the longer form "archetypal example". Mathematical archetypes often appear as "canonical examples".) * a Platonic philosophical idea referring to pure forms which embody the fundamental characteristics of a thing in Platonism * a collectively-inherited unconscious idea, pattern of thought, image, etc., that is universally present, in individual psyches, as in Jungian psychology * a constantly recurring symbol or motif in literature, painting, or mythology (this usage of the term draws from both comparative anthropology and from Jungian archetypal theory )
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Catch-phrase
A CATCHPHRASE (alternatively spelled CATCH PHRASE) is a phrase or expression recognized by its repeated utterance. Such phrases often originate in popular culture and in the arts, and typically spread through a variety of mass media (such as literature and publishing, films, Internet, television and radio), as well as word of mouth. Some become the de facto or literal "trademark" or "signature" of the person or character with whom they originated, and can be instrumental in the typecasting (beneficially or otherwise) of a particular actor. CONTENTS * 1 Culture * 2 See also * 2.1 Lists * 2.2 Related topics * 3 References * 4 Further reading * 5 External links CULTUREAccording to Richard Harris, a psychology professor at Kansas State University who studied why people like to cite films in social situations, using film quotes in everyday conversation is similar to telling a joke and a way to form solidarity with others
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Figure Of Speech
A FIGURE OF SPEECH or RHETORICAL FIGURE is figurative language in the form of a single word or phrase . It can be a special repetition, arrangement or omission of words with literal meaning, or a phrase with a specialized meaning not based on the literal meaning of the words. Figures of speech often provide emphasis, freshness of expression, or clarity. However, clarity may also suffer from their use, as any figure of speech introduces an ambiguity between literal and figurative interpretation
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Idiom
An IDIOM (Latin : idiomī, "special property", from Greek : ἰδίωμα – idíōma, "special feature, special phrasing, a peculiarity", f. Greek : ἴδιος – ídios, "one's own") is a phrase or an expression that has a figurative , or sometimes literal, meaning . Categorized as formulaic language , an idiom's figurative meaning is different from the literal meaning. There are thousands of idioms, occurring frequently in all languages. It is estimated that there are at least twenty-five thousand idiomatic expressions in the English language
English language
. CONTENTS * 1 Derivations * 2 Compositionality * 3 Mobility * 4 Translating idioms * 5 Dealing with non-compositionality * 6 See also * 7 References * 7.1 Bibliography * 8 External links DERIVATIONSMany idiomatic expressions, in their original use, were not figurative but had literal meaning
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World War II
Allied victory * Collapse of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
* Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires * Dissolution of the League of Nations * Creation of the United Nations
United Nations
* Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers * Beginning of the Cold War (more... ) PARTICIPANTS ALLIES AXIS COMMANDERS AND LEADERS MAIN ALLIED LEADERS Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Platitude
A PLATITUDE is a trite, meaningless, or prosaic statement, generally directed at quelling social, emotional, or cognitive unease. Platitudes are geared towards presenting a shallow, unifying wisdom over a difficult topic. However, they are too general and overused to be anything more than undirected statements with ultimately little meaningful contribution towards a solution. Examples could be statements such as "it is what it is", "meet in the middle", "busy as a bee", "method to my madness", "better late than never", "just be yourself", "burning the midnight oil", "strength is something you choose" and "nobody's perfect". Platitudes are generally a form of thought-terminating cliché . CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 Sources ETYMOLOGYThe word is a borrowing from the French compound platitude, from plat 'flat' + -(i)tude '-ness', thus 'flatness'
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Eichmann In Jerusalem
EICHMANN IN JERUSALEM: A REPORT ON THE BANALITY OF EVIL is a book by political theorist Hannah Arendt , originally published in 1963. Arendt, a Jew
Jew
who fled Germany during Adolf Hitler
Adolf Hitler
's rise to power , reported on Adolf Eichmann
Adolf Eichmann
's trial for The New Yorker
The New Yorker
. CONTENTS * 1 Overview * 2 The banality of evil * 3 Controversy * 4 See also * 5 Further reading * 6 Notes * 7 References * 8 External links OVERVIEWArendt's subtitle famously introduced the phrase "the banality of evil," which also serves as the final words of the book
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Hannah Arendt
JOHANNA "HANNAH" ARENDT (/ˈɛərənt/ or /ˈɑːrənt/ ; German: ; 14 October 1906 – 4 December 1975) was a German -born American political theorist . Her 18 books and numerous articles, ranging from works on totalitarianism to thinking and judging, greatly influence political philosophy to this day. Arendt is widely considered one of the most important thinkers of the twentieth century. She escaped from Europe during the Holocaust
Holocaust
, becoming an American citizen. Her works deal with the nature of power and the subjects of politics, direct democracy , authority , and totalitarianism . The Hannah Arendt Prize is named in her honor
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Nazi Party
Hitler Youth
Hitler Youth
* Deutsches Jungvolk
Deutsches Jungvolk
* League of German Girls<
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Adolf Eichmann
OTTO ADOLF EICHMANN (pronounced ; 19 March 1906 – 1 June 1962) was a German Nazi SS - Obersturmbannführer
Obersturmbannführer
(lieutenant colonel) and one of the major organizers of the Holocaust . Eichmann was tasked by SS- Obergruppenführer
Obergruppenführer
(general/lieutenant general) Reinhard Heydrich with facilitating and managing the logistics involved in the mass deportation of Jews
Jews
to ghettos and extermination camps in German-occupied Eastern Europe during World War II
World War II
. In 1960, Eichmann was captured in Argentina
Argentina
by the Mossad , Israel's intelligence service. Following a widely publicised trial in Israel, he was found guilty of war crimes and hanged in 1962
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Kitsch
KITSCH (/ˈkɪtʃ/ ; loanword from German ), also called CHEESINESS or TACKINESS, is art or other objects that appeal to popular rather than high art tastes. Such objects are sometimes appreciated in a knowingly ironic or humorous way. The word was first applied to artwork that was a response to certain divisions of 19th-century art with aesthetics that favored what later art critics would consider to be exaggerated sentimentality and melodrama . Hence, 'kitsch art' is closely associated with 'sentimental art'. Kitsch
Kitsch
is also related to the concept of camp , because of its humorous and ironic nature. To brand visual art as "kitsch" is generally pejorative , as it implies that the work in question is gaudy, or that it serves a solely ornamental and decorative purpose rather than amounting to a work of true artistic merit
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List Of Film And Television Clichés
The following is a list of clichés found to occur frequently in films and television series . Clichés are recurring ideas in fiction and have been considered to have been overused in cinematic and televised media. Clichés are present throughout the action , horror , and romance genres, among others. CONTENTS* 1 Examples by genre * 1.1 Primarily action * 1.2 Primarily horror * 1.3 Primarily romance * 1.4 Primarily sports * 1.5 Primarily Western * 1.6 Miscellaneous * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 External links EXAMPLES BY GENRE This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries. PRIMARILY ACTION DESCRIPTION EXAMPLES REF. A chase scene, be it running on foot or a car chase
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Robert W. Bly
ROBERT W. BLY (born July 21, 1957) is an American writer on the subjects of copywriting , freelance writing , and other marketing/writing subjects. He is a well-known copywriter. Bly grew up in Fair Lawn, New Jersey