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Steam Train
A steam locomotive is a type of railway locomotive that produces its pulling power through a steam engine. These locomotives are fueled by burning combustible material – usually coal, wood, or oil – to produce steam in a boiler. The steam moves reciprocating pistons which are mechanically connected to the locomotive's main wheels (drivers). Both fuel and water supplies are carried with the locomotive, either on the locomotive itself or in wagons (tenders) pulled behind. Steam locomotives were first developed in Great Britain during the early 19th century and used for railway transport until the middle of the 20th century. The first steam locomotive, made by Richard Trevithick, first operated on 21 February 1804, three years after the road locomotive he made in 1801
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DRB Class 41
The German Class 41 steam locomotives were standard goods train engines (Einheitslokomotiven) operated by the Deutsche Reichsbahn (DRB) and built from 1937–1941.Contents1 History 2 Preserved Locomotives 3 DB Rebuild 4 DR Class 41 and DR Rekolok 5 Video 6 See alsoHistory[edit] In the search for a new, fast, goods train locomotive, the Deutsche Reichsbahn-Gesellschaft (DRG) in 1934 was attracted by the proposal from the Berliner Maschinenbau
Berliner Maschinenbau
(BMAG, formerly Louis Schwartzkopff) for a 2-8-2
2-8-2
(1'D1'h2) engine. The design, produced by Friedrich Wilhelm Eckhardt (1892–1961), differed from the DRG's original requirement for a 2-8-0
2-8-0
(1'D) engine, because the required performance with an 18-ton axle load was easier to generate on a 2-8-2
2-8-2
engine rather than one with a 2-8-0
2-8-0
wheel configuration
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Ohio Historical Society
Ohio
Ohio
History
History
Connection is a non-profit organization incorporated in 1885 as The Ohio
Ohio
State Archaeological and Historical Society "to promote a knowledge of archaeology and history, especially in Ohio".[1] Until May 24, 2014, the organization was known as the Ohio Historical Society.[2] Ohio
Ohio
History
History
Connection exists to interpret, preserve, collect, and make available evidence of the past, and to provide leadership on furthering knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of the prehistory and history of Ohio
Ohio
and of the broader cultural and natural environments of which Ohio
Ohio
is a part. Its predecessor was founded by Brig. Gen
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LNER Class A4
The Class A4 is a class of streamlined 4-6-2
4-6-2
steam locomotive designed by Nigel Gresley for the London and North Eastern Railway
London and North Eastern Railway
in 1935. Their streamlined design gave them high-speed capability as well as making them instantly recognisable, and one of the class, 4468 Mallard, holds the world record as the fastest steam locomotive. Thirty-five of the class were built to haul express passenger trains on the East Coast Main Line
East Coast Main Line
route from London Kings Cross via York
York
to Newcastle, and later via Newcastle to Edinburgh, Scotland. They remained in service on the East Coast Main Line
East Coast Main Line
until the early 1960s when they were replaced by Deltic diesel locomotives
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Electric Locomotive
An electric locomotive is a locomotive powered by electricity from overhead lines, a third rail or on-board energy storage such as a battery or a supercapacitor. Electric locomotives with on-board fueled prime movers, such as diesel engines or gas turbines, are classed as diesel-electric or gas turbine-electric and not as electric locomotives, because the electric generator/motor combination serves only as a power transmission system. Electric locomotives benefit from the high efficiency of electric motors, often above 90% (not including the inefficiency of generating the electricity). Additional efficiency can be gained from regenerative braking, which allows kinetic energy to be recovered during braking to put power back on the line. Newer electric locomotives use AC motor-inverter drive systems that provide for regenerative braking. Electric locomotives are quiet compared to diesel locomotives since there is no engine and exhaust noise and less mechanical noise
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Diesel Locomotive
A diesel locomotive is a type of railway locomotive in which the prime mover is a diesel engine. Several types of diesel locomotive have been developed, differing mainly in the means by which mechanical power is conveyed to the driving wheels (drivers). Early internal combustion engine-powered locomotives and railcars used kerosene and gasoline as their fuel. Soon after Dr. Rudolf Diesel patented his first compression ignition engine[1] in 1898, it was considered for railway propulsion. Progress was slow, however, as several problems had to be overcome. Power transmission was a primary concern. As opposed to steam and electric engines, internal combustion engines work efficiently only within a limited range of turning frequencies. In light vehicles, this could be overcome by a clutch. In heavy railway vehicles, mechanical transmission never worked well or wore out too soon
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Rail Tracks
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t ePart of a series onRail transportOperations Track Maintenance High-speed railways Track gauge Stations Trains Locomotives Rolling
Rolling
stock Companies History Attractions Terminology (AU, NA, NZ, UK) By country Accidents Railway couplings Couplers by country Coupler conversion Track gauge Variable gauge Gauge conversion Dual gauge Wheelset Bogie
Bogie
(truck) Dual coupling Rail subsidiesModellingv t eThe track on a railway or railroad, also known as the permanent way, is the structure consisting of the rails, fasteners, railroad ties (sleepers, British English) and ballast (or slab track), plus the underlying subgrade. It enables trains to move by providing a dependable surface for their wheels to roll upon
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William Murdoch
William Murdoch
William Murdoch
(sometimes spelled Murdock) (21 August 1754 – 15 November 1839) was a Scottish engineer and inventor. Murdoch was employed by the firm of Boulton & Watt and worked for them in Cornwall, as a steam engine erector for ten years, spending most of the rest of his life in Birmingham, England. Murdoch was the inventor of the oscillating cylinder steam engine, and gas lighting is attributed to him in the early 1790s, also the term "gasometer". However, Archibald Cochrane, ninth Earl of Dundonald, had already in 1789 used gas for lighting his family estate.[1] Murdoch also made innovations to the steam engine, including the sun and planet gear and D slide valve. He invented the steam gun and the pneumatic tube message system, and worked on one of the first British paddle steamers to cross the English Channel
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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Birmingham
Birmingham
Birmingham
(/ˈbɜːrmɪŋəm/ ( listen),[3] locally /ˈbɜːmɪŋ(ɡ)əm/ or /ˈbɜːmɪnəm/) is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands of England, standing on the River Rea
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William Reynolds (industrialist)
William Reynolds (14 April 1758 – 3 June 1803) was an ironmaster and a partner in the ironworks in Coalbrookdale
Coalbrookdale
in Shropshire, England. He was interested in advances in science and industry, and invented the inclined plane for canals.Contents1 Early life 2 Innovations2.1 Visiting engineers3 Reynolds and Darby families 4 See also 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] He was born in Ketley
Ketley
near Coalbrookdale, son of Richard Reynolds who was in charge of Abraham Darby II's ironworks at Ketley. Around 1777 he took over the management of the works there.[1][2] William Reynolds's education included some time studying with the physician and chemist Joseph Black. Reynolds during his life maintained his interest in many branches of science, including chemistry, geology and mineralogy, and he had a laboratory at his home in Ketley. He was interested in the application of science in industry
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John Fitch (inventor)
John Fitch (January 21, 1743 – July 2, 1798) was an American inventor, clockmaker, entrepreneur and engineer. He was most famous for operating the first steamboat service in the United States.Contents1 Early life 2 Steam-powered boat 3 Steam locomotive 4 Death 5 Legacy5.1 Memorials6 See also 7 Notes and references7.1 Notes 7.2 References8 External linksEarly life[edit] Fitch was born to Joseph Fitch and Sarah Shaler in Windsor, Connecticut, on January 21, 1743, on a farm that is part of present-day South Windsor, Connecticut. He received little formal schooling and eventually apprenticed himself to a clockmaker
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Coalbrookdale
Coalbrookdale
Coalbrookdale
is a village in the Ironbridge Gorge
Ironbridge Gorge
in Shropshire, England, containing a settlement of great significance in the history of iron ore smelting. It lies within the civil parish called the Gorge. This is where iron ore was first smelted by Abraham Darby using easily mined "coking coal". The coal was drawn from drift mines in the sides of the valley. As it contained far fewer impurities than normal coal, the iron it produced was of a superior quality. Along with many other industrial developments that were going on in other parts of the country, this discovery was a major factor in the growing industrialisation of Britain, which was to become known as the Industrial Revolution
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Schiefe Ebene
The Schiefe Ebene (German pronunciation: [ˈʃiːfə ˈeːbənə] literally: 'inclined plane') is a steep railway incline on the course of the Bamberg–Hof section of the Ludwig South-North Railway in the region of Upper Franconia, in Bavaria, Germany.Contents1 Location and construction 2 Operation 3 Accident in 1944 4 Literature 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksLocation and construction[edit] The Schiefe Ebene is located in the Landkreis (country district) of Kulmbach, beginning east of Neuenmarkt–Wirsberg station and ending at Marktschorgast. The route is not electrified, but has been widened to two tracks. On the adjacent incline between Marktschorgast and Stammbach, the second track has been subsequently dismantled. On its way into the Franconian Forest mountains the ramp climbs 157.7 metres over a distance of 6.8 kilometres and therefore has an average incline of 23‰
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Shropshire
Shropshire
Shropshire
(/ˈʃrɒpʃər/ SHROP-shər or /ˈʃrɒpʃɪər/ SHROP-sheer; alternatively Salop;[citation needed] abbreviated, in print only, Shrops; demonym Salopian /səˈloʊpiən/ sə-LOH-pee-ən)[3] is a county in the West Midlands of England, bordering Wales
Wales
to the west, Cheshire
Cheshire
to the north, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
to the east, and Worcestershire
Worcestershire
and Herefordshire
Herefordshire
to the south. Shropshire Council
Shropshire Council
was created in 2009, a unitary authority taking over from the previous county council and five district councils
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Pen-y-darren
Penydarren
Penydarren
(Welsh: Penydarren) is a community in Merthyr Tydfil
Merthyr Tydfil
County Borough in Wales. The area is most notable for being the site of a 1st-century Roman fort, and during the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
it housed Penydarren Ironworks the third largest of the great Merthyr works. Penydarren
Penydarren
was also used by Richard Trevithick
Richard Trevithick
as the location for his experiments into steam locomotion
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