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Stanley Abbey
Stanley Abbey
Abbey
was a medieval abbey near Chippenham, Wiltshire
Wiltshire
in England
England
which flourished between 1151 and 1536.Contents1 Foundation 2 Subsequent history 3 References 4 External links 5 Further readingFoundation[edit] The abbey was given by Empress Matilda
Empress Matilda
in 1151 to monks from Quarr Abbey
Abbey
on the Isle of Wight. Originally at Loxwell, to the east of Chippenham, it moved to nearby Stanley in 1154. The abbey grew in size throughout the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, reaching a size of 450 acres (1.8 km2) at its largest. Its influence also grew, Abbot Nicholas entertaining King John in October 1200 and in 1210 Abbot Thomas of Calstone attending the meeting of King John and the Cistercian
Cistercian
abbots at York
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Religious Order
A religious order is a lineage of communities and organizations of people who live in some way set apart from society in accordance with their specific religious devotion, usually characterized by the principles of its founder's religious practice. The order is composed of laypeople and, in some orders, clergy
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Dissolution Of The Monasteries
The Dissolution of the Monasteries, sometimes referred to as the Suppression of the Monasteries, was the set of anti-Catholic administrative and legal processes between 1536 and 1541 by which Henry VIII disbanded Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
monasteries, priories, convents and friaries in England and Wales
Wales
and Ireland, appropriated their income, disposed of their assets, and provided for their former personnel and functions
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Spye Park, Wiltshire
Spye Park (grid reference ST952674) is a 90.3 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, notified in 1951. The historic house which stood there, near the great Roman road from London to Bath, had been twice destroyed by fire, most recently in 1974. The new owner, as of 2005, was planning to rebuild a Palladian house. Spye Park is about two miles (3 km) to the north of Bromham village in Wiltshire.Contents1 History of Spye Park House 2 Owners of the Estate since the Restoration2.1 Bayntun family 2.2 Bayntun-Rolt baronets (1726-1816) 2.3 Bayntun-Starkey family (1816-1864) 2.4 Spicer family (1864-2005) 2.5 Enthoven Family (2005-present)3 Notes 4 Sources 5 External linksHistory of Spye Park House[edit] The house was first known to be owned in the 16th century by Edward Baynton (1517–1593) of Rowdon; he had previously been Battle Abbey Steward and had built Bromham Hall in 1538
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Dovecote
A dovecote or dovecot /ˈdʌvkɒt/ (Scots: doocot) is a structure intended to house pigeons or doves.[1] Dovecotes may be free-standing structures in a variety of shapes, or built into the end of a house or barn
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Harold Brakspear
Sir Harold Brakspear
Harold Brakspear
KCVO (10 March 1870 – 20 November 1934) was a noted restoration architect and archaeologist. [1] He restored a number of ancient and notable buildings, including[1] Bath Abbey, Windsor Castle
Windsor Castle
and Brownston House, Devizes and St Cyriac's Church in Lacock. He lived in Corsham, Wiltshire, very close to his projects at Lacock Abbey, Hazelbury Manor and Great Chalfield Manor.[1] References[edit]^ a b c BRAKSPEAR, Sir; Harold (b. Corsham, Wilts. 10 March 1870 - d. 20 November 1934). Who's Who 2006 and Who Was Who 1897-2005 (2005). Retrieved 10 October 2006
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Blacksmith
A blacksmith is a metalsmith who creates objects from wrought iron or steel by forging the metal, using tools to hammer, bend, and cut (cf. whitesmith)
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Manor House
A manor house was historically the main residence of the lord of the manor. The house formed the administrative centre of a manor in the European feudal system; within its great hall were held the lord's manorial courts, communal meals with manorial tenants and great banquets. The term is today loosely applied to various country houses, frequently dating from the late medieval era, which formerly housed the gentry. They were sometimes fortified, but this was frequently intended more for show than for defence. Manor
Manor
houses existed in most European countries where feudalism existed, where they were sometimes known as castles, palaces, and so on
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Edward Baynton
Sir Edward Bayntun (1480 – 27 November? 1544), of Bromham, Wiltshire, was a gentleman at the court of Henry VIII of England. He was vice-chamberlain to Anne Boleyn, the King's second wife, and was the brother-in-law of Queen Catherine Howard, Henry VIII's fifth wife.Contents1 Early life 2 Vice-Chamberlain 3 War with France and death 4 Personality 5 Family 6 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Sir Edward Bayntun was born at Faulston House in Faulston in the county of Wiltshire
Wiltshire
in 1480. Though medieval accounts record the name "Baynton" as such, the spelling around the Tudor period was "Bayntun." In 1516, Sir Edward inherited the Manors of Bromham and Faulston after the death of his father John Bayntun
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Edward II
Edward II (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), also called Edward of Carnarvon, was King of England
King of England
from 1307 until he was deposed in January 1327. The fourth son of Edward I, Edward became the heir apparent to the throne following the death of his older brother Alphonso. Beginning in 1300, Edward accompanied his father on campaigns to pacify Scotland, and in 1306 he was knighted in a grand ceremony at Westminster Abbey. Edward succeeded to the throne in 1307, following his father's death. In 1308, he married Isabella of France, the daughter of the powerful King Philip IV, as part of a long-running effort to resolve the tensions between the English and French crowns. Edward had a close and controversial relationship with Piers Gaveston, who had joined his household in 1300. The precise nature of Edward and Gaveston's relationship is uncertain; they may have been friends, lovers or sworn brothers
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Edward I Of England
Edward
Edward
I (17/18 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots (Latin: Malleus Scotorum), was King of England
King of England
from 1272 to 1307. Before his accession to the throne, he was commonly referred to as The Lord Edward.[1] He spent much of his reign reforming royal administration and common law. Through an extensive legal inquiry, Edward
Edward
investigated the tenure of various feudal liberties, while the law was reformed through a series of statutes regulating criminal and property law. Increasingly, however, Edward's attention was drawn towards military affairs. As the first son of Henry III, Edward
Edward
was involved early in the political intrigues of his father's reign, which included an outright rebellion by the English barons. In 1259, he briefly sided with a baronial reform movement, supporting the Provisions of Oxford
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John Of England
John (24 December 1166 – 19 October 1216), also known as John Lackland (Norman French: Johan sanz Terre),[1] was King of England from 6 April 1199 until his death in 1216. John lost the Duchy of Normandy
Normandy
to King Philip II of France, resulting in the collapse of most of the Angevin Empire
Angevin Empire
and contributing to the subsequent growth in power of the Capetian dynasty
Capetian dynasty
during the 13th century. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom. John, the youngest of five sons of King Henry II of England
Henry II of England
and Duchess Eleanor of Aquitaine, was at first not expected to inherit significant lands
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Isle Of Wight
The Isle of Wight
Isle of Wight
(/waɪt/; also referred to informally as IoW or The Island)[4] is a county and the largest and second-most populous island in England. It is in the English Channel, about 2 miles (3.2 km) off the coast of Hampshire, separated by the Solent. The island has resorts that have been holiday destinations since Victorian times, and is known for its mild climate, coastal scenery, and verdant landscape of fields, downland and chines. The island has been home to the poets Swinburne and Tennyson and to Queen Victoria, who built her much-loved summer residence and final home Osborne House
Osborne House
at East Cowes. It has a maritime and industrial tradition including boat-building, sail-making, the manufacture of flying boats, the hovercraft, and Britain's space rockets
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