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Stamford, Lincolnshire
Stamford is a town on the River Welland
River Welland
in Lincolnshire, England, 92 miles (148 km) north of London
London
on the A1
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Woolen
Woolen (American English) or woollen (Commonwealth English) is a type of yarn made from carded wool. Woolen yarn is soft, light, stretchy, and full of air. It is thus a good insulator, and makes a good knitting yarn. Woolen yarn is in contrast to worsted yarn, in which the fibers are combed to lie parallel rather than carded, producing a hard, strong yarn.[1][2]Contents1 Commercial manufacture 2 Handspinning woolen yarn 3 References 4 External linksCommercial manufacture[edit] The woolen and worsted process both require that the wool (and other similar animal fibers, cashmere, camel, etc.) be cleaned before mechanical processing
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The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
is the largest-selling British national newspaper in the "quality press" market category. It is published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News UK, which is in turn owned by News Corp. Times Newspapers also publishes The Times. The two papers were founded independently and have been under common ownership only since 1966. They were bought by News International in 1981. The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
occupies a dominant position in the quality Sunday market; its circulation of just under one million equals that of its main rivals, The Sunday Telegraph and The Observer, combined.[5] While some other national newspapers moved to a tabloid format in the early 2000s, The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
has retained the larger broadsheet format and has said that it will continue to do so
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East Midlands Ambulance Service
East Midlands Ambulance Service
East Midlands Ambulance Service
National Health Service (NHS) Trust (EMAS) provides emergency 999, urgent care and patient transport services for the 4.8 million people within the East Midlands region of the UK - covering Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire (except Glossop, Hadfield and Tintwistle), Leicestershire, Rutland, Lincolnshire (including North and North East Lincolnshire).Contents1 Performance 2 Funding 3 See also 4 References 5 Ex
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List Of Members Of The European Parliament For The United Kingdom, 2014–19
Legislation1972 EC Act 1986 EC (Amendment) Act 1993 EC (Amendment) Act 1998 EC (Amendment) Act 2002 EC (Amendment) Act 2008 EU (Amendment) Act 2011 EU ActEuropean Parliament Elections1979 1984 1989 1994 1999 2004 2009 20141973 delegation 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8thWithdrawal2004–05 EU Bill 2013–14 EU (Referendum) Bill 2015–16 EU membership renegotiation 2015 EU Referendum Act 2016 EU (Referendum) Act (Gibraltar)2016 EU membership referendumCauses Endorsements Issues Opinion pollingCampaignsOrganisations advocating and campaigning for a referendumPeople's Pledge Labour for a ReferendumLeave Vote Leave
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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List Of United Kingdom Parliament Constituencies
There are 650 constituencies in the United Kingdom, each electing a single Member of Parliament to the House of Commons ordinarily every five years. Voting
Voting
last took place in all 650 of those constituencies at the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
general election on 8 June 2017, and these results have been counted and verified. The election on 8 June 2017 elected 650 constituencies. 317 are held by the Conservative Party, 262 are held by the Labour Party, 35 are held by the Scottish National Party, 12 are held by the Liberal Democrats and 10 are held by the Democratic Unionist Party, with the balance held by various smaller parties, none of which have more than 8 seats, plus four unaffiliated MPs
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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List Of Places In England
Here is a list of places, divided by ceremonial county of England.Northumberland Durham Lancashire Cheshire Derbs. Notts. Lincolnshire Leics. Staffs. Shropshire Warks. Northants. Norfolk Suffolk Essex Herts. Beds. Bucks. Oxon. Glos. Somerset Wiltshire Berkshire Kent Surrey Hampshire Dorset Devon Cornwall Heref. Worcs. Bristol East Riding of Yorkshire Rutland Cambs. Greater London Tyne & Wear Cumbria North Yorkshire South Yorks. West Yorkshire Greater Manc. Merseyside East Sussex West Sussex Isle of Wight West MidlandsSee also[edit]Toponymy of Great Britain Toponymical list of counties of the United Kingdom List of generic forms in British place names List of places in the United Kingdom Subdivisions of the United Kingdom List of places in Northern Ireland List of places in Scotland List of places in Wales List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Englandv t eList of places in EnglandBedfordshire Berkshire Bristol Buckinghamshire
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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Boudica
Boudica
Boudica
(Latinised as Boadicea or Boudicea /boʊdɪˈsiːə/, and known in Welsh as Buddug [ˈbɨ̞ðɨ̞ɡ])[1][2] was a queen of the British Celtic Iceni
Iceni
tribe who led an uprising against the occupying forces of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in AD 60 or 61, and died shortly after its failure: having supposedly poisoned herself. She is considered a British folk hero.[3] Boudica's husband, Prasutagus, ruled as a nominally independent ally of Rome and left his kingdom jointly to his daughters and the Roman emperor in his will. However, when he died, his will was ignored, and the kingdom was annexed and his property taken
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Fire Services In The United Kingdom
The fire services in the United Kingdom operate under separate legislative and administrative arrangements in England and Wales, Northern Ireland, and Scotland. Emergency cover is provided by over fifty fire and rescue services (FRS), which is the term used in modern legislation and by government departments.[1] Many FRS were previously known as brigades or county fire services, but almost all now use the standard terminology. They are distinct from and governed by a fire authority, which is the legislative, public and administrative body, made up of civilians (usually members of elected local or regional bodies). Fire authorities in England and Wales
England and Wales
(and formerly Scotland), and therefore fire and rescue services, receive a large proportion of their funding through a share of Council Tax
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Legio IX Hispana
Legio IX Hispana
Legio IX Hispana
("Spanish 9th Legion"),[1] also Legio nona Hispana ("Spanish Ninth Legion"), was a legion of the Imperial Roman army
Imperial Roman army
that existed from the 1st century BC until at least AD 120. The legion fought in various provinces of the late Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and early Roman Empire. It was stationed in Britain following the Roman invasion in 43 AD. The legion disappears from surviving Roman records after c. AD 120 and there is no extant account of what happened to it. The unknown fate of the legion has been the subject of considerable research and speculation. One theory (per historian Theodor Mommsen) was that the legion was wiped out in action in northern Britain soon after 108, the date of the latest datable inscription of the Ninth found in Britain, perhaps during a rising of northern tribes against Roman rule
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Anglo-Saxons
The Anglo- Saxons
Saxons
were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest.[1] The early Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language
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Edgar The Peaceful
Edgar (Old English: Ēadgār; c. 943—8 July 975), known as the Peaceful or the Peaceable, was King of England from 959 until his death. He was the younger son of Edmund I
Edmund I
and Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury, and came to the throne as a teenager, following the death of his older brother Eadwig. As king, Edgar further consolidated the political unity achieved by his predecessors, with his reign being noted for its relative stability. His most trusted advisor was Dunstan, whom he recalled from exile and made Archbishop of Canterbury
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Danelaw
The Danelaw
Danelaw
(/ˈdeɪnˌlɔː/, also known as the Danelagh; Old English: Dena lagu;[1] Danish: Danelagen), as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, is a historical name given to the part of England
England
in which the laws of the Danes held sway[2] and dominated those of the Anglo-Saxons. Danelaw
Danelaw
contrasts West Saxon law and Mercian law. The term is first recorded in the early eleventh century as Dena lage.[3] Modern historians have extended the term to a geographical designation. The areas that constituted the Danelaw
Danelaw
lie in northern and eastern England. The Danelaw
Danelaw
originated from the Viking
Viking
expansion of the 9th century AD, although the term was not used to describe a geographic area until the 11th century AD
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