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Daylight Saving Time

Daylight saving time (DST), also daylight savings time or daylight time (the United States and Canada) and summer time (United Kingdom, European Union, and others), is the practice of advancing clocks during warmer months so that darkness falls later each day according to the clock. The typical implementation of DST is to set clocks forward by one hour in the spring ("spring forward") and set clocks back by one hour in autumn ("fall back") to return to standard time.[1][2] As a result, there is one 23-hour day in late winter or early spring and one 25-hour day in the autumn. George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[3] The German Empire and Austria-Hungary organized the first nationwide implementation starting on April 30, 1916. Many countries have used it at various times since then, particularly since the 1970s energy crisis
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British Summer Time
During British Summer Time (BST), civil time in the United Kingdom is advanced one hour forward of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) (in effect, changing the time zone from UTC+00:00 to UTC+01:00), so that mornings have one hour less daylight, and evenings one hour more.[1][2] BST begins at 01:00 GMT on the last Sunday of March and ends at 01:00 GMT (02:00 BST) on the last Sunday of October. Since 22 October 1995, the starting and finishing times of daylight saving time across the European Union have been aligned[3] – for instance Central European Summer Time begins and ends on the same Sundays at exactly the same time (that is, 02:00 Central European Time, which is 01:00 GMT)
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Ellenhall
Ellenhall is a small Staffordshire village roughly 2.5 miles south of Eccleshall originally comprising part of the extensive estates of the Earl of Lichfield. The population as taken at the 2011 census was 144.[1] The village consists of a scattered community of cottages, a hall, and several farms. Ellenhall has no shop, public house or post office. The village church stands on a natural mound close to the highest point at the northern end of the village and is dedicated to St. Mary. The grey sandstone chancel is the oldest part of the church dating from the 12th century, while the red-brick nave and tower represent a 1757 re-build of an earlier structure. The architect for the restoration was Andrew Capper.[2] The registers of St Mary, Ellenhall, commenced in 1539. The original registers for the period 1599-1903 (Baptisms), 1563-1754 & 1813-1836 (Marriages) & 1539-1964 (Burials) are deposited at Staffordshire Record Office
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Local Government Act 1972

The Local Government Act 1972 (c. 70) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that reformed local government in England and Wales on 1 April 1974.[1] It was one of the most significant Acts of Parliament to be passed by the Heath Government of 1970–74 and is surpassed only by the European Communities Act 1972 which took the United Kingdom into the European Communities. Its pattern of two-tier metropolitan and non-metropolitan county and district councils remains in use today in large parts of England, although the metropolitan county councils were abolished in 1986, and both county and district councils have been replaced with unitary authorities in many areas since the 1990s
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Urban District (Great Britain And Ireland)

In England and Wales, Northern Ireland, and the Republic of Ireland, an urban district was a type of local government district that covered an urbanised area. Urban districts had an elected urban district council (UDC), which shared local government responsibilities with a county council. In England and Wales, urban districts and rural districts were created in 1894 (by the Local Government Act 1894) as subdivisions of administrative counties.[1] They replaced the earlier system of urban and rural sanitary districts (based on poor law unions) the functions of which were taken over by the district councils. The district councils also had wider powers over local matters such as parks, cemeteries and local planning.[2] An urban district usually contained a single parish, while a rural district might contain many
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