HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

St Michael's Church, Monkton Combe
St Michael's Church is the Church of England
Church of England
parish church of Monkton Combe, Somerset, England. It is a Grade II listed building.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Norman Church 3 Regency Church 4 Victorian Church 5 Organ 6 Churchyard 7 See also 8 External links 9 ReferencesBackground[edit] The structure is mostly mid-Victorian. Predominantly an example of Early English Gothic Revival, the structure has a steep pitched polychrome Welsh Slate
Welsh Slate
roof and other aspects that clearly mark it from a distance as being a mid 19th Century construction. The main tower is surmounted by a gilded weather cock. Norman Church[edit] The village was owned by the Bath Abbey monks, hence the name Monkton Combe, and the first structure was considered to be an “ancient Norman” one
[...More...]

"St Michael's Church, Monkton Combe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Christian Denomination
A Christian denomination
Christian denomination
is a distinct religious body within Christianity, identified by traits such as a name, organisation, leadership and doctrine. Individual bodies, however, may use alternative terms to describe themselves, such as church or sometimes fellowship. Divisions between one group and another are defined by authority and doctrine; issues such as the nature of Jesus, the authority of apostolic succession, eschatology, and papal primacy may separate one denomination from another. Groups of denominations—often sharing broadly similar beliefs, practices, and historical ties—are sometimes known as "branches of Christianity". Individual Christian groups vary widely in the degree to which they recognize one another. Several groups claim to be the direct and sole authentic successor of the church founded by Jesus
Jesus
Christ in the 1st century AD
[...More...]

"Christian Denomination" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
[...More...]

"World War I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pipe Organ
The pipe organ is a musical instrument that produces sound by driving pressurized air (called wind) through organ pipes selected via a keyboard. Because each pipe produces a single pitch, the pipes are provided in sets called ranks, each of which has a common timbre and volume throughout the keyboard compass. Most organs have multiple ranks of pipes of differing timbre, pitch, and volume that the player can employ singly or in combination through the use of controls called stops. A pipe organ has one or more keyboards (called manuals) played by the hands, and a pedalboard played by the feet; each keyboard has its own group of stops. The keyboard(s), pedalboard, and stops are housed in the organ's console. The organ's continuous supply of wind allows it to sustain notes for as long as the corresponding keys are pressed, unlike the piano and harpsichord whose sound begins to dissipate immediately after a key is depressed
[...More...]

"Pipe Organ" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carillon
A carillon (US: /ˈkærəlɒn/ or UK: /kəˈrɪljən/;[1] French: [kaʁijɔ̃]) is a musical instrument that is typically housed in the bell tower (belfry) of a church or municipal building. The instrument consists of at least 23 cast bronze, cup-shaped bells, which are played serially to produce a melody, or sounded together to play a chord
[...More...]

"Carillon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Monkton Combe School
Eddystone (MSS Boys)           Farm (MSS Boys)           Grove Grange (MSS Girls)      School (MSS Boys)      Clarendon (MSS Girls)      Nutfield (MSS Girls)      Hatton (MPS Mixed) (Subhouses of Hatton:) Easterfield (MPS Mixed)      Kearns (MPS Mixed)      Howard (MPS Mixed)      Jameson (MPS Mixed)     Colours Red     , White     , Blue     Former pupils Old MonktoniansWebsite www.monktoncombeschool.com Monkton Combe
Monkton Combe
School is an independent boarding and day school of the British public school tradition, near Bath, England
[...More...]

"Monkton Combe School" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Welsh Slate
The existence of a slate industry in Wales
Wales
is attested since the Roman period, when slate was used to roof the fort at Segontium, now Caernarfon. The slate industry grew slowly until the early 18th century, then expanded rapidly until the late 19th century, at which time the most important slate producing areas were in northwest Wales, including the Penrhyn Quarry
Penrhyn Quarry
near Bethesda, the Dinorwic Quarry
Dinorwic Quarry
near Llanberis, the Nantlle Valley
Nantlle Valley
quarries, and Blaenau Ffestiniog, where the slate was mined rather than quarried
[...More...]

"Welsh Slate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Early English Period
English Gothic is an architectural style originating in France, before then flourishing in England from about 1180 until about 1520. As with the Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
of other parts of Europe, English Gothic is defined by its pointed arches, vaulted roofs, buttresses, large windows, and spires. The Gothic style was introduced from France, where the various elements had first been used together within a single building at the choir of the Basilique Saint-Denis
Basilique Saint-Denis
north of Paris, built by the Abbot Suger
Abbot Suger
and dedicated on 11 June 1144.[1] The earliest large-scale applications of Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
in England are at Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury Cathedral
and Westminster Abbey
[...More...]

"Early English Period" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Listed Building
A listed building or listed structure is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England
Historic England
in England, Historic Environment Scotland
Historic Environment Scotland
in Scotland, Cadw
Cadw
in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland. The term has also been used in Ireland, where buildings are surveyed for the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
in accordance with the country's obligations under the Granada Convention. However, the preferred term in Ireland is protected structure.[1] A listed building may not be demolished, extended, or altered without special permission from the local planning authority, which typically consults the relevant central government agency, particularly for significant alterations to the more notable listed buildings
[...More...]

"Listed Building" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Somerset
Somerset
Somerset
(/ˈsʌmərsɛt/ ( listen)) (or archaically, Somersetshire) is a county in South West England
England
which borders Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
and Bristol
Bristol
to the north, Wiltshire
Wiltshire
to the east, Dorset
Dorset
to the south-east and Devon
Devon
to the south-west. It is bounded to the north and west by the Severn Estuary
Severn Estuary
and the Bristol
Bristol
Channel, its coastline facing southeastern Wales
[...More...]

"Somerset" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Church Of England Parish Church
A parish church in the Church of England
Church of England
is the church which acts as the religious centre for the people within the smallest and most basic Church of England
Church of England
administrative region, the parish – since the 19th century called the ecclesiastical parish (outside meetings of the church) to avoid confusion with the civil parish which many towns and villages have.Contents1 Parishes in England 2 Character 3 Notable parish churches 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksParishes in England[edit] In England, there are parish churches for both the Church of England and the Roman Catholic Church. References to a "parish church", without mention of a denomination, will, however, almost certainly be to those of the Church of England
Church of England
due to its status as the Established Church
[...More...]

"Church Of England Parish Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Province Of Canterbury
The Province of Canterbury, or less formally the Southern Province, is one of two ecclesiastical provinces which constitute the Church of England. The other is the Province of York
Province of York
(which consists of 12 dioceses).[1] It consists of 30 dioceses, covering roughly two-thirds of England,[2] parts of Wales, and the Channel Islands,[3] with the remainder comprising continental Europe
Europe
(under the jurisdiction of the Diocese
Diocese
of Gibraltar in Europe). Between the years 787 and 803, a third province, (of) Lichfield, existed.[4] In 1871, the Church of Ireland
Church of Ireland
became autonomous
[...More...]

"Province Of Canterbury" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ecclesiastical Province
An ecclesiastical province is a general term for one of the basic forms of jurisdiction in Christian
Christian
Churches with traditional hierarchical structure, including Western Christianity
Christianity
and Eastern Christianity. In general, ecclesiastical province is consisted of several dioceses (or eparchies), one of them being the archdiocese (or archeparchy), headed by metropolitan bishop or archbishop who has ecclesiastical jurisdiction over all other bishops of the province. In the Greco-Roman world, ecclesia (Greek ἐκκλησίᾱ, ekklēsiā ( Latin
Latin
ecclesia) meaning "congregation, church") was used to refer to a lawful assembly, or a called legislative body
[...More...]

"Ecclesiastical Province" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Diocese Of Bath And Wells
The Diocese
Diocese
of Bath and Wells is a diocese in the Church of England Province of Canterbury
Province of Canterbury
in England. The diocese covers the county of Somerset
Somerset
and a small area of Dorset. The Episcopal seat of the Bishop of Bath and Wells
Bishop of Bath and Wells
is located in the Cathedral Church of Saint Andrew in the city of Wells in Somerset.Contents1 History1.1 Early name variation 1.2 Medieval diocese of Bath and Wells 1.3 Reformation 1.4 Contemporary diocese2 Bishops 3 Diocesan structure 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksHistory[edit] Early name variation[edit] Before 909, Somerset
Somerset
lay within the diocese of Sherborne
[...More...]

"Diocese Of Bath And Wells" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.