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St Matthew Friday Street
ST. MATTHEW FRIDAY STREET was a church in the City of London
London
located on Friday Street, off Cheapside . Recorded since the 13th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, then rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren
Christopher Wren
. The rebuilt church was demolished in 1885. CONTENTS * 1 The middle ages * 2 Seventeenth century * 3 Rebuilding after the Great Fire * 4 Demolition * 5 Organ * 5.1 Organists * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 Publications * 9 External links THE MIDDLE AGESSt. Matthew was the only church in the City of London
London
dedicated to the apostle and patron saint of accountants. Friday Street was so named, according to John Stow , after the fishmongers living there, although none are recorded in the parish records
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Corinthian Columns
The CORINTHIAN ORDER is the last developed of the three principal classical orders of ancient Greek and Roman architecture . The other two are the Doric order
Doric order
which was the earliest, followed by the Ionic order . When classical architecture was revived during the Renaissance , two more orders were added to the canon, the Tuscan order
Tuscan order
and the Composite order
Composite order
. The Corinthian, with its offshoot the Composite, is the most ornate of the orders, characterized by slender fluted columns and elaborate capitals decorated with acanthus leaves and scrolls. There are many variations. The name "Corinthian" is derived from the ancient Greek city of Corinth , although the style had its own model in Roman practice, following precedents set by the Temple of Mars Ultor
Temple of Mars Ultor
in the Forum of Augustus (c. 2 AD)
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Surrey
SURREY /ˈsʌri/ is a county in the South East England
England
, and one of the home counties . It borders Kent
Kent
to the east, Sussex
Sussex
to the south, Hampshire to the west, Berkshire
Berkshire
to the north-west and Greater London to the north-east. The county town is Guildford
Guildford
. Surrey
Surrey
County Council sits outside its jurisdiction in Kingston upon Thames
Kingston upon Thames
, part of Greater London
Greater London
since 1965. With a population of 1.1 million, Surrey is the third-most-populous county in the South East
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Ten Commandments
The TEN COMMANDMENTS, also known as the DECALOGUE, are a set of biblical laws relating to ethics and worship , which play a fundamental role in Judaism
Judaism
, Christianity
Christianity
, and Islam
Islam
. The commandments include instructions to worship only God , to honour one\'s parents , and to keep the sabbath , as well as prohibitions against idolatry , blasphemy , murder , adultery , theft , dishonesty , and coveting . Different religious groups follow different traditions for interpreting and numbering them. The Ten Commandments appear twice in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
, in the books of Exodus and Deuteronomy
Deuteronomy

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List Of Christopher Wren Churches In London
CONTENTS* 1 Churches in the City of London * 1.1 Survived in original form * 1.2 Substantially altered before the Blitz * 1.3 Substantially rebuilt after the Blitz * 1.4 Tower remaining * 1.5 Stones re-used * 1.6 Demolished due to the Union of Benefices Act (chronological order) * 1.7 Demolished for other reasons (chronological order) * 1.8 Destroyed in the Blitz * 1.9 Interior refurbished by Christopher Wren
Christopher Wren
* 2 Churches built outside the City of London * 3 See also * 4 Bibliography * 5 External links CHURCHES IN THE CITY OF LONDONEighty-eight parish churches were burned during the Great Fire of London in 1666. The office of Christopher Wren
Christopher Wren
rebuilt 51 parish churches and St Paul\'s Cathedral
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Dorking
DORKING /ˈdɔːr.kɪŋ/ is a market town in Surrey
Surrey
, England between Ranmore Common in the North Downs range of hills and Leith Hill in the Greensand Ridge , centred 21 miles (34 km) from London
London
. In the Georgian and Victorian periods six prominent sites in the former parish or on its boundaries became grand country estates : Leith Hill Place , Denbies (today a vineyard/hotel) , Norbury Park
Norbury Park
, Polesden Lacey
Polesden Lacey
, Wotton House and Deepdene ; five of which along with nearby Box Hill 's promontory and chalk grassland slopes belong to the National Trust . Dorking
Dorking
is a commuter and retirement settlement with three railway stations and a few large offices of multinational companies
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Great Bookham
GREAT BOOKHAM is a village in Surrey
Surrey
, England, one of six semi-rural spring line settlements between the towns of Leatherhead
Leatherhead
and Guildford . The Bookhams – Great and Little Bookham – are part of the Saxon settlement of Bocham, "the village by the beeches", the latter being a very narrow strip parish . They are surrounded by common land . Great Bookham is the home of the two village's railway station ; Bookham railway station in Church Road. The villages are astride the A246, which is the non-motorway and direct route between the two towns. Once two distinct villages, the Bookhams have long been interconnected with residential roads that give the impression of one large village
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Reredos
A REREDOS or RAREDOS is a large altarpiece , a screen, or decoration placed behind the altar in a church . It often includes religious images. CONTENTS * 1 Description * 2 Terminology * 3 Examples from various churches * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links DESCRIPTIONA reredos can be made of stone, wood, metal, ivory , or a combination of materials. The images may be painted, carved, gilded , composed of mosaics , and/or embedded with niches for statues . Sometimes a tapestry is used, or other fabric such as silk or velvet . TERMINOLOGYThe term reredos is sometimes confused with the term retable . While a reredos is generally placed on the floor behind an altar, a retable is placed either on the altar or immediately behind and attached to the altar. In French (and sometimes in English by confusing the terms), a reredos is called a retable; in Catalan a retaule, in Spanish a retablo, etc
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Edward Lovett Pearce
Sir
Sir
EDWARD LOVETT PEARCE (1699 – 7 December 1733) was an Irish architect, and the chief exponent of palladianism in Ireland. He is thought to have initially studied as an architect under his father's first cousin, Sir
Sir
John Vanbrugh
John Vanbrugh
. He is best known for the Irish Houses of Parliament in Dublin, and his work on Castletown House . The architectural concepts he employed on both civic and private buildings were to change the face of architecture in Ireland. He could be described as the father of Irish Palladian
Palladian
architecture and Georgian Dublin
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Margaret Greville
DAME MARGARET HELEN GREVILLE, HON MRS GREVILLE, DBE (1863–1942), was a British society host and philanthropist. FAMILYBorn as MARGARET HELEN ANDERSON, she was the daughter of William McEwan (1827-1913), a brewery multimillionaire, who later was elected as an M.P. (Member of Parliament). Her mother was Helen Anderson (1835/1836–1906), but she was not married to William when Margaret, their daughter was born. In fact, it was not until 1885, when Margaret was 21, and the family had moved to London, that William McEwan and Helen Anderson married. In 1891, when she was 28, Margaret Anderson married Hon. Ronald Henry Fulke Greville , eldest son of the 2nd Baron Greville . They had no children; he died in 1908. She was a close friend of Queen Mary
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Polesden Lacey
Thomas Cubitt
Thomas Cubitt
Ambrose Poynter ARCHITECTURAL STYLE(S) Regency OWNER National Trust LISTED BUILDING – GRADE II* Official name: Polesden Lacey DESIGNATED 7 Sep 1951 REFERENCE NO. 1028665 Location of Polesden Lacey
Polesden Lacey
in Surrey
Surrey
POLESDEN LACEY is an Edwardian
Edwardian
house (expanded from an earlier building) and estate. It is located on the North Downs
North Downs
at Great Bookham , near Dorking
Dorking
, Surrey
Surrey
, England
England
. It is owned and run by the National Trust and is one of the Trust's most popular properties. This Regency house was extensively remodelled in 1906 by Margaret Greville , a well-known Edwardian
Edwardian
hostess
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List Of Churches Rebuilt After The Great Fire But Since Demolished
This is a list of churches in the City of London which were rebuilt after the Great Fire of London
Great Fire of London
(or in a later date) but have been demolished since then. All were designed by Sir Christopher Wren except All Hallows Staining
All Hallows Staining
, Holy Trinity Gough Square , St Alphage London Wall
London Wall
, St James Duke\'s Place , St Katherine Coleman , St Martin Outwich , St Peter le Poer and the non-Anglican churches and chapels. Sometimes there is still some sign that a place of worship was once there. Parish register details were often transferred to the subsuming parish
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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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St Anne And St Agnes
Coordinates : 51°30′59″N 0°5′47″W / 51.51639°N 0.09639°W / 51.51639; -0.09639 ST ANNE & ST AGNES CHURCH Exterior of St Anne "> The Church of St Anne and St Agnes, Gresham Street, EC2, 1941 by Dennis Flanders The first mention of a church on the present site is in documents of 1137 which refer to 'St Agnes near Alderychgate' and the 'priest of St Anne's' which was situated near Aldredesgate'. There was confusion over the name since the church was described variously in Norman records as St Anne-in-the-Willows and as St Agnes. Its unusual double dedication, unique in the City, seems to have been acquired some time in the 15th century. The church was gutted by a fire in 1548 but was rebuilt soon after. Further work was done in 1624. However, the building's 14th century tower was its only section to survive the Great Fire of London
Great Fire of London
in 1666 (and then only partially)
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St Andrew Undershaft
ST ANDREW UNDERSHAFT is a Church of England
England
church in the City of London
London
, the historic nucleus and modern financial centre of London. It is located on St Mary Axe , within the Aldgate
Aldgate
ward, and is a rare example of a City church that survived both the Great Fire of London and the Blitz . The present building was constructed in 1532 but a church has existed on the site since the 12th century. Today, St Andrew Undershaft
St Andrew Undershaft
is administered from the nearby St Helen\'s Bishopsgate church
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