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St Matthew Friday Street
St. Matthew Friday Street
Friday Street
was a church in the City of London
London
located on Friday Street, off Cheapside. Recorded since the 13th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, then rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. The rebuilt church was demolished in 1885.Contents1 The middle ages 2 Seventeenth century 3 Rebuilding after the Great Fire 4 Demolition 5 Organ5.1 Organists6 See also 7 References 8 Publications 9 External linksThe middle ages[edit] St. Matthew was the only church in the City of London
London
dedicated to the apostle and patron saint of accountants. Friday Street
Friday Street
was so named, according to John Stow, after the fishmongers living there, although none are recorded in the parish records
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Friday Street
Friday Street
Friday Street
is a hamlet on the gentle lower north slope of Leith Hill in Surrey, England. It is in a wooded headwater ravine, just to the south of Wotton and the A25, a single rather than dual road, running between Guildford
Guildford
to the west and Dorking
Dorking
to the east. Statistically it is insufficient to make up a census unit. Friday Street also has varied map definitions and is part of the relatively sparsely populated civil parish of Wotton. Its lake is one of three hammer ponds in the Vale of Holmesdale
Vale of Holmesdale
in Surrey
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Great Bookham
Great Bookham
Great Bookham
is a village in Surrey, England, one of six semi-rural spring line settlements between the towns of Leatherhead
Leatherhead
and Guildford. The Bookhams – Great and Little Bookham
Little Bookham
– are part of the Saxon settlement of Bocham, "the village by the beeches", the latter being a very narrow strip parish. They are surrounded by common land. Great Bookham
Great Bookham
is the home of the two village's railway station ; Bookham railway station
Bookham railway station
in Church Road. The villages are astride the A246, which is the non-motorway and direct route between the two towns
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George Godwin
George Godwin
George Godwin
FRS (28 January 1813 – 27 January 1888) was an influential architect, journalist, and editor of The Builder magazine. Contents1 Life 2 The Builder 3 Other works 4 Death 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksLife[edit] He was one of nine children of the architect George Godwin
George Godwin
senior (1780–1863)[1] and trained at his father's architectural practice in Kensington
Kensington
where he set up in business with his brother Henry Godwin (1831–1917). Encouraged by his friend the antiquary John Britton, he pursued an interest in architectural history and wrote several volumes on the Churches of London (1838), mason's marks and gothic style. He was also interested in new materials and wrote on the use of concrete (1836). He soon joined the Institute of British Architects, the Society of Antiquaries, and became a Fellow of the Royal Society
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Reredos
A reredos or raredos is a large altarpiece, a screen, or decoration placed behind the altar in a church. It often includes religious images.Contents1 Description 2 Terminology 3 Examples from various churches 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] A reredos can be made of stone, wood, metal, ivory, or a combination of materials. The images may be painted, carved, gilded, composed of mosaics, and/or embedded with niches for statues. Sometimes a tapestry is used, or other fabric such as silk or velvet. Terminology[edit] The term reredos is sometimes confused with the term retable. While a reredos is generally placed on the floor behind an altar, a retable is placed either on the altar or immediately behind and attached to the altar. In French (and sometimes in English by confusing the terms), a reredos is called a retable; in Catalan a retaule, in Spanish a retablo, etc
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Edward Lovett Pearce
Sir
Sir
Edward Lovett Pearce
Edward Lovett Pearce
(1699 – 7 December 1733) was an Irish architect, and the chief exponent of palladianism in Ireland. He is thought to have initially studied as an architect under his father's first cousin, Sir
Sir
John Vanbrugh. He is best known for the Irish Houses of Parliament in Dublin, and his work on Castletown House. The architectural concepts he employed on both civic and private buildings were to change the face of architecture in Ireland
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Margaret Greville
Dame Margaret Helen Greville, Hon Mrs Greville, DBE (1863–1942), was a British society host and philanthropist. Family[edit] Born as Margaret Helen Anderson, she was the daughter of William McEwan (1827-1913), a brewery multimillionaire, who later was elected as an M.P. (Member of Parliament).[1][2] Her mother was Helen Anderson (1835/1836–1906), but she was not married to William when Margaret, their daughter was born. In fact, it was not until 1885, when Margaret was 21, and the family had moved to London, that William McEwan and Helen Anderson married. In 1891, when she was 28, Margaret Anderson married Hon. Ronald Henry Fulke Greville, eldest son of the 2nd Baron Greville. They had no children; he died in 1908. She was a close friend of Queen Mary
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Polesden Lacey
Thomas Cubitt Ambrose PoynterArchitectural style(s) RegencyOwner National TrustListed Building – Grade II*Official name: Polesden LaceyDesignated 7 Sep 1951Reference no. 1028665Location of Polesden Lacey
Polesden Lacey
in Surrey Polesden Lacey
Polesden Lacey
is an Edwardian
Edwardian
house (expanded from an earlier building) and estate. It is located on the North Downs
North Downs
at Great Bookham, near Dorking, Surrey, England. It is owned and run by the National Trust and is one of the Trust's most popular properties. This Regency house was extensively remodelled in 1906 by Margaret Greville, a well-known Edwardian
Edwardian
hostess
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Dorking
Dorking
Dorking
/ˈdɔːr.kɪŋ/ is a market town in Surrey, England
England
between Ranmore Common
Ranmore Common
in the North Downs
North Downs
range of hills and Leith Hill
Leith Hill
in the Greensand Ridge, centred 21 miles (34 km) from London.[2] In the Georgian and Victorian periods six prominent sites in the former parish or on its boundaries became grand country estates: Leith Hill Place, Denbies
Denbies
(today a vineyard/hotel), Norbury Park, Polesden Lacey, Wotton House and Deepdene; five of which along with nearby Box Hill's promontory and chalk grassland slopes belong to the National Trust
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Henry Burton (Puritan)
Henry Burton (Yorkshire, 1578–1648), was an English puritan. Along with John Bastwick
John Bastwick
and William Prynne, Burton's ears were cut off in 1637 for writing pamphlets attacking the views of Archbishop Laud.Contents1 Early life 2 Under James I 3 Under Charles I 4 Star Chamber conviction 5 Release and later life 6 Works 7 Family 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksEarly life[edit] He was born at Birstall, a small parish in the West Riding of Yorkshire, in the latter part of 1578 as may be inferred from his writings. His father, William Burton, was married to Maryanne Homle [Humble] on 24 June 1577. He was educated at St. John's College, Cambridge, where he graduated M.A. in 1602.[1] His favourite preachers were Laurence Chaderton
Laurence Chaderton
and William Perkins
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Surrey
Surrey
Surrey
(/ˈsʌri/ SURR-ee)[2] is a county in South East England, and one of the home counties. It borders Kent
Kent
to the east, Sussex
Sussex
to the south, Hampshire
Hampshire
to the west, Berkshire
Berkshire
to the north-west and Greater London
London
to the north-east. The county town is popularly considered to be Guildford
Guildford
although Surrey County Council
Surrey County Council
sits outside its jurisdiction in Kingston upon Thames, part of Greater London
Greater London
since 1965
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Corinthian Columns
The Corinthian order
Corinthian order
is the last developed of the three principal classical orders of ancient Greek and Roman architecture. The other two are the Doric order
Doric order
which was the earliest, followed by the Ionic order. When classical architecture was revived during the Renaissance, two more orders were added to the canon, the Tuscan order
Tuscan order
and the Composite order. The Corinthian, with its offshoot the Composite, is the most ornate of the orders. This architectural style is characterized by slender fluted columns and elaborate capitals decorated with acanthus leaves and scrolls. There are many variations. The name Corinthian is derived from the ancient Greek city of Corinth, although the style had its own model in Roman practice, following precedents set by the Temple of Mars Ultor
Temple of Mars Ultor
in the Forum of Augustus (c
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Ten Commandments
The Ten
The Ten
Commandments, also known as the Decalogue, are a set of biblical laws relating to ethics and worship, which play a fundamental role in Judaism
Judaism
and Christianity. The commandments include instructions to worship only God, to honour one's parents, and to keep the sabbath, as well as prohibitions against idolatry, blasphemy, murder, adultery, theft, dishonesty, and coveting. Different religious groups follow different traditions for interpreting and numbering them. The Ten
The Ten
Commandments appear twice in the Hebrew Bible, in the books of Exodus and Deuteronomy
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List Of Christopher Wren Churches In London
Christopher
Christopher
is the English version of a Europe-wide name derived from the Greek name Χριστόφορος (Christóforos). The constituent parts are Χριστός (Christós), "Christ" or "Anointed", and φέρειν (férein), "bear": the "Christ-bearer". It is related to the names Chris
Chris
meaning "Anointed" and christop meaning "follower of Christ" or "little Christ" As a given, or first name, Christopher
Christopher
has been in use since the 10th century. In English, Christopher
Christopher
may be abbreviated as "Chris", and sometimes "Kit"
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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