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SriYantra Color
Color
Color
(American English) or colour (Commonwealth English) is the characteristic of human visual perception described through color categories, with names such as red, orange, yellow, green, blue, or purple. This perception of color derives from the stimulation of cone cells in the human eye by electromagnetic radiation in the visible spectrum. Color
Color
categories and physical specifications of color are associated with objects through the wavelength of the light that is reflected from them. This reflection is governed by the object's physical properties such as light absorption, emission spectra, etc. By defining a color space, colors can be identified numerically by coordinates, which in 1931 were also named in global agreement with internationally agreed color names like mentioned above (red, orange, etc) by the International Commission on Illumination
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Color (other)
Color
Color
is the visual perceptual property corresponding in humans to the categories called red, yellow, blue, etc
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Art
Art
Art
is a diverse range of human activities in creating visual, auditory or performing artifacts (artworks), expressing the author's imaginative or technical skill, intended to be appreciated for their beauty or emotional power.[1][2] In their most general form these activities include the production of works of art, the criticism of art, the study of the history of art, and the aesthetic dissemination of art. The oldest documented forms of art are visual arts, which include creation of images or objects in fields including today painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, and othe
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Honey Bee
A honey bee (or honeybee) is any member of the genus Apis, primarily distinguished by the production and storage of honey and the construction of perennial, colonial nests from wax. In the early 21st century, only seven species of honey bee are recognized, with a total of 44 subspecies,[1] though historically six to eleven species are recognized. The best known honey bee is the Western honey bee
Western honey bee
which has been domesticated for honey production and crop pollination. Honey bees represent only a small fraction of the roughly 20,000 known species of bees.[2] Some other types of related bees produce and store honey, including the stingless honey bees, but only members of the genus Apis are true honey bees
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Bumblebees
A bumblebee (also written bumble bee) is a member of the genus Bombus, part of Apidae, one of the bee families. This genus is the only extant group in the tribe Bombini, though a few extinct related genera (e.g., Calyptapis) are known from fossils. Over 250 species of bumblebee are known.[1] They are found primarily in higher altitudes or latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, although they are also found in South America where a few lowland tropical species have been identified. European bumblebees have also been introduced to New Zealand
New Zealand
and Tasmania. The brood parasitic or cuckoo bumblebees have sometimes been classified as a subgenus or genus, Psithyrus, but are now usually treated as members of Bombus. Many bumblebees are social insects that form colonies with a single queen. The colonies are smaller than those of honey bees, growing to as few as 50 individuals in a nest
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Ultraviolet
Ultraviolet
Ultraviolet
(UV) is an electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength from 100 nm to 400 nm, shorter than that of visible light but longer than X-rays. UV radiation is present in sunlight constituting about 10% of the total light output of the Sun. It is also produced by electric arcs and specialized lights, such as mercury-vapor lamps, tanning lamps, and black lights. Although long-wavelength ultraviolet is not considered an ionizing radiation because its photons lack the energy to ionize atoms, it can cause chemical reactions and causes many substances to glow or fluoresce. Consequently, the chemical and biological effects of UV are greater than simple heating effects, and many practical applications of UV radiation derive from its interactions with organic molecules. Suntan and sunburn are familiar effects of over-exposure of the skin to UV, along with higher risk of skin cancer
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Papilio
See text Papilio
Papilio
is a genus in the swallowtail butterfly family, Papilionidae, as well as the only representative of the tribe Papilionini. The word papilio is Latin
Latin
for butterfly.[1] The genus includes a number of well-known North American species such as the western tiger swallowtail ( Papilio
Papilio
rutulus)
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Pentachromacy
Pentachromacy describes the capability and capacity for capturing, transmitting, processing, and perceiving five independent channels of color information through the primary visual system. Organisms with pentachromacy are termed pentachromats. For these organisms, it would take at least five differing ranges of wavelengths along the electromagnetic spectrum to reproduce their full visual spectrum. In comparison, a combination of red, green, and blue wavelengths of light are all that is necessary to simulate most of the common human trichromat visual spectrum. One proposed explanation for pentachromacy is a retina containing five distinct types of cone cells with differing absorption spectra
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Stomatopod
BathysquilloideaBathysquillidae IndosquillidaeGonodactyloideaAlainosquillidae Hemisquillidae Gonodactylidae Odontodactylidae Protosquillidae Pseudosquillidae TakuidaeErythrosquilloideaErythrosquillidaeLysiosquilloideaCoronididae Lysiosquillidae Nannosquillidae TetrasquillidaeSquilloideaSquillidaeEurysquilloideaEurysquillidaeParasquilloideaParasquillidaeMantis shrimps, or stomatopods, are marine crustaceans of the order Stomatopoda. They branched from other members of the class Malacostraca
Malacostraca
around 400 million years ago.[2] Mantis shrimps typically grow to around 10 centimetres (3.9 in) in length
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Mantis Shrimp
BathysquilloideaBathysquillidae IndosquillidaeGonodactyloideaAlainosquillidae Hemisquillidae Gonodactylidae Odontodactylidae Protosquillidae Pseudosquillidae TakuidaeErythrosquilloideaErythrosquillidaeLysiosquilloideaCoronididae Lysiosquillidae Nannosquillidae TetrasquillidaeSquilloideaSquillidaeEurysquilloideaEurysquillidaeParasquilloideaParasquillidaeMantis shrimps, or stomatopods, are marine crustaceans of the order Stomatopoda. They branched from other members of the class Malacostraca
Malacostraca
around 400 million years ago.[2] Mantis shrimps typically grow to around 10 centimetres (3.9 in) in length
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Colorimetry
Colorimetry
Colorimetry
is "the science and technology used to quantify and describe physically the human color perception."[1] It is similar to spectrophotometry, but is distinguished by its interest in reducing spectra to the physical correlates of color perception, most often the CIE 1931 XYZ color space tristimulus values and related quantities.[2]Contents1 Instruments1.1 Tristimulus
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Human Eye
The human eye is an organ which reacts to light and pressure. As a sense organ, the mammalian eye allows vision. Human eyes help to provide a three dimensional, moving image, normally coloured in daylight. Rod and cone cells in the retina allow conscious light perception and vision including color differentiation and the perception of depth
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Color Theory
In the visual arts, color theory or colour theory is a body of practical guidance to color mixing and the visual effects of a specific color combination. There are also definitions (or categories) of colors based on the color wheel: primary color, secondary color[1] and tertiary color. Although color theory principles first appeared in the writings of Leone Battista Alberti
Leone Battista Alberti
(c. 1435) and the notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci
Leonardo da Vinci
(c. 1490), a tradition of "colory theory" began in the 18th century, initially within a partisan controversy over Isaac Newton's theory of color (Opticks, 1704) and the nature of primary colors. From there it developed as an independent artistic tradition with only superficial reference to colorimetry and vision science.Contents1 Color
Color
abstractions 2 Historical background 3 Traditional color theory3.1 Complementary colors 3.2 Warm vs
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Physics
Physics
Physics
(from Ancient Greek: φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), romanized: physikḗ (epistḗmē), lit. 'knowledge of nature', from φύσις phýsis 'nature')[1][2][3] is the natural science that studies matter,[4] its motion and behavior through space and time, and that studies the related entities of energy and force.[5] Physics
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CMYK Color Model
The CMYK color model
CMYK color model
(process color, four color) is a subtractive color model, used in color printing, and is also used to describe the printing process itself. CMYK refers to the four inks used in some color printing: cyan, magenta, yellow, and key (black). The reason for black ink being referred to as key is because in four-color printing, cyan, magenta, and yellow printing plates are carefully keyed, or aligned, with the key of the black key plate. Some sources suggest that the "K" in CMYK comes from the last letter in "black" and was chosen because B already means blue.[1][2] However, some people disagree with this because there is no blue in the primary CMYK colors; it is made with cyan and magenta. Some sources claim this explanation, although useful as a mnemonic, is incorrect, that K comes only from "Key" because black is often used as outline and printed first
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Light
Light
Light
is electromagnetic radiation within a certain portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The word usually refers to visible light, which is the visible spectrum that is visible to the human eye and is responsible for the sense of sight.[1] Visible light is usually defined as having wavelengths in the range of 400–700 nanometres (nm), or 4.00 × 10−7 to 7.00 × 10−7 m, between the infrared (with longer wavelengths) and the ultraviolet (with shorter wavelengths).[2][3] This wavelength means a frequency range of roughly 430–750 terahertz (THz).Beam of sun light inside the cavity of Rocca ill'Abissu at Fondachelli Fantina, SicilyThe main source of light on Earth
Earth
is the Sun. Sunlight
Sunlight
provides the energy that green plants use to create sugars mostly in the form of starches, which release energy into the living things that digest them
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