HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Squadron (naval)
A squadron, or naval squadron, is a significant group of warships which is nonetheless considered too small to be designated a fleet. A squadron is typically a part of a fleet. Between different navies there are no clear defining parameters to distinguish a squadron from a fleet (or from a flotilla), and the size and strength of a naval squadron varies greatly according to the country and time period.[1] Groups of small warships, or small groups of major warships, might instead be designated flotillas by some navies according to their terminology. Since the size of a naval squadron varies greatly, the rank associated with command of a squadron also varies greatly. Before 1864 the entire fleet of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
was divided into three squadrons, the red, the white, and the blue. Each Royal Navy
Royal Navy
squadron alone was more powerful than most national navies
[...More...]

"Squadron (naval)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Captain (naval)
Captain is the name most often given in English-speaking navies to the rank corresponding to command of the largest ships. The rank is equal to the army rank of colonel. Equivalent ranks worldwide include "ship-of-the-line captain" (e.g. France, Argentina, Spain), "captain of sea and war" (e.g. Portugal), "captain at sea" (e.g
[...More...]

"Captain (naval)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Anti-submarine
An anti-submarine weapon (ASW) is any one of a number of devices that are intended to act against a submarine and its crew, to destroy (sink) the vessel or reduce its capability as a weapon of war
[...More...]

"Anti-submarine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Second World War
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"Second World War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Tactical Formation
A tactical formation (or order) is the arrangement or deployment of moving military forces such as infantry, cavalry, AFVs, military aircraft, or naval vessels. Formations were found in tribal societies such as the "pua rere" of the Māori,[1] and ancient or medieval formations which include shield walls (skjaldborg in Old Norse), phalanxes (lines of battle in close order), Testudo formation
Testudo formation
and skirmishers. Tactical formations include:Column Line Square Wedge and inverted wedge Echelon Vee Staggered column Coil HerringboneA vanguard is the forward element of a column formation, and the rear-guard is the rear-most element of the column formation
[...More...]

"Tactical Formation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Naval Tactics
Naval tactics
Naval tactics
is the collective name for methods of engaging and defeating an enemy ship or fleet in battle at sea during naval warfare, the naval equivalent of military tactics on land. Naval tactics
Naval tactics
are distinct from naval strategy. Naval tactics
Naval tactics
are concerned with the movements a commander makes in battle, typically in the presence of the enemy. Naval strategy concerns the overall strategy for achieving victory and the large movements by which a Commandant and commander secures the advantage of fighting at a place convenient to himself. Modern naval tactics are based on tactical doctrines developed after World War
War
II, following the obsolescence of the battleship and the development of long-range missiles
[...More...]

"Naval Tactics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aircraft Carrier
An aircraft carrier is a warship that serves as a seagoing airbase, equipped with a full-length flight deck and facilities for carrying, arming, deploying, and recovering aircraft.[1] Typically, it is the capital ship of a fleet, as it allows a naval force to project air power worldwide without depending on local bases for staging aircraft operations. Carriers have evolved since their inception in the early twentieth century from wooden vessels used to deploy balloons to nuclear-powered warships that carry numerous fighter planes, strike aircraft, helicopters, and other types of aircraft. Whilst heavier aircraft such as fixed-wing gunships and bombers have been launched from aircraft carriers, it is currently not possible to land them. By its diplomatic and tactical power, its mobility, its autonomy and the variety of its means, the aircraft carrier is often the centerpiece of modern combat fleets
[...More...]

"Aircraft Carrier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

SubRon
A submarine squadron (SUBRON) is a naval formation or unit in such states such as the United Kingdom, United States, and Russia/Soviet Union
[...More...]

"SubRon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
[...More...]

"First World War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Grand Fleet
The Grand Fleet
Grand Fleet
was the main fleet of the British Royal Navy
Royal Navy
during the First World War.Contents1 History 2 Order of battle 3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksHistory[edit]The 2nd Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet
Grand Fleet
in 1914. From left to right the ships are: King George V, Thunderer, Monarch and Conqueror.The Grand Fleet
Grand Fleet
sailing in parallel columns during the First World WarIt was formed in August 1914 from the First Fleet and elements of the Second Fleet of the Home Fleets and it included 25–35 state-of-the-art capital ships
[...More...]

"Grand Fleet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Line Of Battle
In naval warfare, the line of battle is a tactic in which a naval fleet of ships forms a line end to end. Its first use is disputed, variously claimed for dates ranging from 1502 to 1652, with line-of-battle tactics in widespread use by 1675. Compared with prior naval tactics, in which two opposing ships closed on one another for individual combat, the line of battle has the advantage that each ship in the line can fire its broadside without fear of hitting a friendly ship. Therefore, in a given period, the fleet can fire more shots. Another advantage is that a relative movement of the line in relation to some part of the enemy fleet allows for a systematic concentration of fire on that part
[...More...]

"Line Of Battle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Age Of Sail
The Age of Sail
Sail
(usually dated as 1571–1862) was a period roughly corresponding to the early modern period in which international trade and naval warfare were dominated by sailing ships, lasting from the 16th to the mid-19th century.[1]Contents1 Definition 2 Golden Age of Sail 3 Decline 4 See also 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit] Like most periodic eras the definition is inexact but close enough to serve as a general description
[...More...]

"Age Of Sail" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Warships
A warship is a naval ship that is built and primarily intended for naval warfare. Usually they belong to the armed forces of a state.[1] As well as being armed, warships are designed to withstand damage and are usually faster and more maneuverable than merchant ships. Unlike a merchant ship, which carries cargo, a warship typically carries only weapons, ammunition and supplies for its crew. Warships usually belong to a navy, though they have also been operated by individuals, cooperatives and corporations. In wartime, the distinction between warships and merchant ships is often blurred. In war, merchant ships are often armed and used as auxiliary warships, such as the Q-ships of the First World War
First World War
and the armed merchant cruisers of the Second World War. Until the 17th century it was common for merchant ships to be pressed into naval service and not unusual for more than half a fleet to be composed of merchant ships
[...More...]

"Warships" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Frigates
A frigate /ˈfrɪɡɪt/ is any of several types of warship, the term having been used for ships of various sizes and roles over the last few centuries. In the 17th century, this term was used for any warship built for speed and maneuverability, the description often used being "frigate-built". These could be warships carrying their principal batteries of carriage-mounted guns on a single deck or on two decks (with further smaller carriage-mounted guns usually carried on the forecastle and quarterdeck of the vessel). The term was generally used for ships too small to stand in the line of battle, although early line-of-battle ships were frequently referred to as frigates when they were built for speed. In the 18th century, the term referred to ships that were usually as long as a ship of the line and were square-rigged on all three masts (full-rigged), but were faster and with lighter armament, used for patrolling and escort
[...More...]

"Frigates" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rear Admiral
Rear admiral
Rear admiral
is a naval commissioned officer rank above that of a commodore and captain, and below that of a vice admiral. It is generally regarded as the lowest of the "admiral" ranks, which are also sometimes referred to as "flag officers" or "flag ranks". In many navies it is referred to as a two-star rank (OF-7). It originated from the days of naval sailing squadrons and can trace its origins to the Royal Navy. Each naval squadron would be assigned an admiral as its head, who would command from the centre vessel and direct the activities of the squadron. The admiral would in turn be assisted by a vice admiral, who commanded the lead ships which would bear the brunt of a naval battle. In the rear of the naval squadron, a third admiral would command the remaining ships and, as this section of the squadron was considered to be in the least danger, the admiral in command of the rear would typically be the most junior of the squadron admirals
[...More...]

"Rear Admiral" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Vice Admiral
Vice admiral
Vice admiral
is a senior naval flag officer rank, equivalent to lieutenant general and air marshal. A vice admiral is typically senior to a rear admiral and junior to an admiral. In many navies,[1] vice admiral is a three-star rank with a NATO code of OF-8, although in some navies like the French Navy
French Navy
it is an OF-7
OF-7
rank, the OF-8
OF-8
code corresponding to the four-star rank of squadron vice-admiral.Contents1 Rank insignia 2 Gallery 3 Australia 4 Canada 5 France 6 Germany 7 India 8 Italy 9 Philippines 10 Poland 11 United Kingdom11.1 History12 United States 13 Vietnam 14 Notes 15 See alsoRank insignia[edit] The rank insignia for a vice admiral often involves three stars, but this is not always the case
[...More...]

"Vice Admiral" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.