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Squad (other)
In military terminology, a squad is a sub-subunit[1] led by a non-commissioned officer[2] that is subordinate to an infantry platoon. In countries following the British Army
British Army
tradition (Australian Army, Canadian Army, and others), this organization is referred to as a section
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Squad (other)
A squad is a small military unit. Squad
Squad
may also refer to:The Squad
Squad
(Irish Republican Army unit), an Irish Republican Army unit founded in 1919 The
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Military District
Military districts (also called military regions) are formations of a state's armed forces (often of the Army) which are responsible for a certain area of territory. They are often more responsible for administrative than operational matters, and in countries with conscript forces, often handle parts of the conscription cycle. Navies
Navies
have also used a similar model, with organizations such as the United States Naval Districts
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Division (military)
A division is a large military unit or formation, usually consisting of between 10,000 and 20,000 soldiers. Infantry
Infantry
divisions during the World Wars
World Wars
ranged between 8,000 and 30,000 in nominal strength. In most armies, a division is composed of several regiments or brigades; in turn, several divisions typically make up a corps. Historically, the division has been the default combined arms unit capable of independent operations. Smaller combined arms units, such as the American Regimental combat team (RCT) during World War II, were used when conditions favored them
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Major General
Major
Major
general (abbreviated MG,[1] Maj. Gen. and similar) is a military rank used in many countries. It is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general. The disappearance of the "sergeant" in the title explains the apparently confusing phenomenon whereby a lieutenant general outranks a major general. (Although a major outranks a lieutenant, a lieutenant outranks a sergeant-major). In the Commonwealth
Commonwealth
and the United States, it is a division commander's rank subordinate to the rank of lieutenant general and senior to the ranks of brigadier and brigadier general
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Corps
Corps
Corps
(/kɔːr/; plural corps /kɔːrz/; via French, from the Latin corpus "body") is a term used for several different kinds of organization. Within military terminology a corps may be:an operational formation, sometimes known as a field corps, which consists of two or more divisions, such as the Corps
Corps
d'armée, later known as I Corps
Corps
("First Corps") of Napoleon's Grande Armée); an administrative corps (or mustering) – that is a specialized branch of a military service (such as an artillery corps, a medical corps, or a force of military police) or; in some cases, a distinct service within a national military (such as the United States Marine Corps).These usages often overlap
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Lieutenant General
Lieutenant
Lieutenant
general, lieutenant-general and similar (abbrev Lt. Gen, LTG and similar) is a three-star military rank (NATO code OF-8) used in many countries. The rank traces its origins to the Middle Ages, where the title of lieutenant general was held by the second in command on the battlefield, who was normally subordinate to a captain general. In modern armies, lieutenant general normally ranks immediately below general and above major general; it is equivalent to the navy rank of vice admiral, and in air forces with a separate rank structure, it is equivalent to air marshal
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Field Army
A field army (or numbered army or simply army) is a military formation in many armed forces, composed of two or more corps and may be subordinate to an army group. Likewise, air armies are equivalent formation within some air forces. A field army is composed of 100,000 to 150,000 troops. Particular field armies are usually named or numbered to distinguish them from "army" in the sense of an entire national land military force. In English, the typical style for naming field armies is word numbers, such as "First Army"; whereas corps are usually distinguished by Roman numerals (e.g. I Corps) and subordinate formations with ordinal numbers (e.g. 1st Division)
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General
A general officer is an officer of high rank in the army, and in some nations' air forces or marines.[1] The term "general" is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer and as a specific rank. It originates in the 16th century, as a shortening of captain general, which rank was taken from Middle French capitaine général. The adjective general had been affixed to officer designations since the late medieval period to indicate relative superiority or an extended jurisdiction. Today, the title of "General" is known in some countries as a four-star rank. However different countries use different systems of stars for senior ranks
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Army Group
An army group is a military organization consisting of several field armies, which is self-sufficient for indefinite periods. It is usually responsible for a particular geographic area. An army group is the largest field organization handled by a single commander—usually a full general or field marshal—and it generally includes between 400,000 and 1,000,000 soldiers. In the Polish Armed Forces
Polish Armed Forces
and former Soviet Red Army
Red Army
an army group was known as a Front. The equivalent of an army group in the Imperial Japanese Army was a "general army" (Sō-gun (総軍)). Army groups may be multi-national formations. For example, during World War II, the Southern Group of Armies (also known as the U.S. 6th Army Group) comprised the U.S. Seventh Army
U.S

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Front (military Formation)
A front (Russian: фронт, front) is a type of military formation that originated in the Russian Empire, and has been used by the Polish Army, the Red Army, the Soviet Army, and Turkey. It is roughly equivalent to an army group in the military of most other countries. It varies in size but in general contains three to five armies.[1] It should not be confused with the more general usage of military front, describing a geographic area in wartime
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Field Marshal
Field marshal
Field marshal
(or field-marshal, abbreviated as FM) is a very senior military rank, ordinarily senior to the general officer ranks. Usually it is the highest rank in an army, and when it is, few (if any) persons are appointed to it. It is considered as a five-star rank (OF-10) in modern-day armed forces in many countries. Promotion to the rank of field marshal in many countries historically required extraordinary military achievement by a general (a wartime victory). However, the rank has also been used as a divisional command rank and also as a brigade command rank
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General Of The Army
General
General
of the Army
Army
(GA)[1] is a military rank used (primarily in the United States of America) to denote a senior military leader, usually a general in command of a nation's army.Contents1
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Theater (warfare)
In warfare, a theater or theatre (see spelling differences) is an area or place in which important military events occur or are progressing.[1][2] A theater can include the entirety of the air space, land and sea area that is or that may potentially become involved in war operations.[3]Contents1 Theater of war 2 Theater of operations 3 Soviet and Russian Armed Forces 4 United States 5 See also 6 ReferencesTheater of war[edit] In his book On War, Carl von Clausewitz
Carl von Clausewitz
defines the term as one that: "Denotes properly such a portion of the space over which war prevails as has its boundaries protected, and thus possesses a kind of independence. This protection may consist of fortresses, or important natural obstacles presented by the country, or even in its being separated by a considerable distance from the rest of the space embraced in the war
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Colonel
Colonel
Colonel
(abbreviated Col., Col or COL and pronounced /ˈkɜːrnəl/, similar to "kernel") is a senior military officer rank below the general officer ranks. However, in some small military forces, such as those of Iceland
Iceland
or the Vatican, colonel is the highest rank. It is also used in some police forces and paramilitary organizations. Historically, in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a colonel was typically in charge of a regiment in an army. Modern usage varies greatly, and in some cases the term is used as an honorific title that may have no direct relationship to military service. The rank of colonel is typically above the rank of lieutenant colonel. The rank above colonel is typically called brigadier, brigade general or brigadier general. Equivalent naval ranks may be called captain or ship-of-the-line captain
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Commander-in-chief
A commander-in-chief, also sometimes called supreme commander, or chief commander, is the person or body that exercises supreme operational command and control of a nation's military forces. As a technical term, it refers to military competencies that reside in a nation-state's executive leadership—a head of state, a head of government . Often, a given country's commander-in-chief (if held by an official) need not be or have been a commissioned officer or even a veteran
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