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Springfield, Massachusetts
Springfield is a city in western New England, and the seat of Hampden County, Massachusetts, United States.[15] Springfield sits on the eastern bank of the Connecticut River
Connecticut River
near its confluence with three rivers: the western Westfield River, the eastern Chicopee River, and the eastern Mill River. As of the 2010 Census, the city's population was 153,060.[9] Metropolitan Springfield, as one of two metropolitan areas in Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(the other being Greater Boston), had a population of 692,942 as of 2010.[11] The first Springfield in the New World, it is the largest city in western New England, and the urban, economic, and cultural capital of Massachusetts' Connecticut River
Connecticut River
Valley (colloquially known as the Pioneer Valley)
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
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United States Dollar
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
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Federal Information Processing Standard
Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the United States federal government
United States federal government
for use in computer systems by non-military government agencies and government contractors.[1] FIPS standards are issued to establish requirements for various purposes such as ensuring computer security and interoperability, and are intended for cas
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UTC-4
UTC−04:00 is a time offset that subtracts 4 hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). It is observed in the Eastern Time Zone
Eastern Time Zone
(e.g., Canada
Canada
and the United States) during the warm months of daylight saving time, as Eastern Daylight Time. The Atlantic Time Zone
Atlantic Time Zone
observes it during standard time (cold months)
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Colony
In politics and history, a colony is a territory under the immediate political control of a state, distinct from the home territory of the sovereign.[vague] For colonies in antiquity, city-states would often found their own colonies. Some colonies were historically countries, while others were territories without definite statehood from their inception. The metropolitan state is the state that rules the colony. In Ancient Greece, the city that founded a colony was known as the metropolis. "Mother country" is a reference to the metropolitan state from the point of view of citizens who live in its colony
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Kingdom Of Great Britain
The Kingdom of Great Britain, officially called simply Great Britain,[1] was a sovereign state in western Europe from 1 May 1707 to 31 December 1800. The state came into being following the Treaty of Union in 1706, ratified by the Acts of Union 1707, which united the kingdoms of England
England
and Scotland
Scotland
to form a single kingdom encompassing the whole island of Great Britain
Great Britain
and its outlying islands, with the exception of the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
and the Channel Islands. It also did not include Ireland, which remained a separate realm. The unitary state was governed by a single parliament and government that was based in Westminster
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Kingdom Of England
Unitary parliamentary monarchy (1215–1707)Monarch •  927–939 Æthelstan
Æthelstan
(first)[a] •  1702–1707 Anne (last)[b]Legislature Parliament •  Upper house House of Lords •  Lower house House of CommonsHistory •  Unification 10th century •  Battle of Hastings 14 October 1066 •  Conquered Wales 1277–1283 •  Incorporated Wales 1535–1542 •  Union of the Crowns 24 March 1603 •  Glorious Revolution 11 December 1688 
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Geographic Names Information System
The Geographic Names Information System
Geographic Names Information System
(GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States
United States
of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States
United States
Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States
United States
Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded
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Mayor-council Government
The mayor–council government system is a system of organization of local government. It is one of the two most common forms of local government in the United States and is also used in Canada. It is the one most frequently adopted in large cities, although the other form, council–manager government, is the typical local government form of more municipalities. Characterized by having a mayor who is elected by the voters, the mayor–council variant may be broken down into two main variations depending on the relationship between the legislative and executive branches, becoming a weak-mayor or a strong-mayor variation based upon the powers of the office
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North American Numbering Plan
The North American Numbering Plan
North American Numbering Plan
(NANP) is a telephone numbering plan that encompasses 25 distinct regions in twenty countries primarily in North America, including the Caribbean
Caribbean
and the U.S. territories. Not all North American countries participate in the NANP. The NANP was originally devised in the 1940s by AT&T for the Bell System and independent telephone operators in North America, to unify the diverse local numbering plans that had been established in the preceding decades. AT&T continued to administer the numbering plan until the breakup of the Bell System
Bell System
when administration was delegated to the North American Numbering Plan
North American Numbering Plan
Administration (NANPA), a service that has been procured from the private sector by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the United States
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Namesake
A namesake is a person named after another,[1][2][3] or more broadly, a thing (such as a company, place, ship, building, or concept) named after a person.[2][4] According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a namesake is also defined as "a person or thing having the same name as another".[5]Contents1 History 2 Usage 3 Family 4 Culture 5 Concepts 6 See also 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] The word is first recorded in the mid-17th century, and probably comes from the phrase "for [the, my, his, her] name's sake".[5][2][3][6] Usage[edit] In general, the second recipient of a name, named for the first, is said to be the namesake of the first
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County Seat
A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in the United States, Canada, Romania, Mainland China
Mainland China
and Taiwan. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.Contents1 Function 2 U.S. counties with more than one county seat 3 Other variations3.1 New England 3.2 Virginia 3.3 South Dakota 3.4 Louisiana 3.5 Alaska 3.6 Canada
Canada
and Vermont4 Lists of U.S. county seats by state 5 Lists of Taiwan
Taiwan
county seats by county 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksFunction[edit] In most of the United States, counties are the political subdivisions of a state. The city, town, or populated place that houses county government is known as the seat of its respective county
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United States Democratic Party
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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2010 United States Census
The 2010 United States
United States
Census (commonly referred to as the 2010 Census) is the twenty-third and most recent United States
United States
national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010.[1] The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired.[2][3] The population of the United States
United States
was counted as 308,745,538,[4] a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census.Contents1 Introduction 2 Major changes 3 Cost 4 Technology 5 Marketing and undercounts 6 Reapportionment 7 Controversies7.1 Clemons v
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Metropolitan Area
A metropolitan area, sometimes referred to as a metro area or commuter belt, is a region consisting of a densely populated urban core and its less-populated surrounding territories, sharing industry, infrastructure, and housing.[1] A metro area usually comprises multiple jurisdictions and municipalities: neighborhoods, townships, boroughs, cities, towns, exurbs, suburbs, counties, districts, states, and even nations like the eurodistricts
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