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Sports Sedan
A sports sedan — also known as "sports saloon" — is a subjective term for a sedan/saloon car which is designed to have sporting performance or handling characteristics. In the United Kingdom, the term super saloon is used instead of sports sedan
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Australian Sports Sedan Championship
The National Series for Sports Sedans , formerly the Australian Sports Sedan Championship, is a CAMS sanctioned national motor racing title for drivers of cars complying with Australian Sports Sedan regulations
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Microcar
A microcar is the smallest automobile classification, usually applied to very small cars (smaller than city cars). Such small cars were generally referred to as cyclecars until the 1940s. More recent models are also called bubble cars due to their bubble-shaped appearance.A 1939 Speed King Auto Racer, built as a fairground ride by R. E. Chambers Company for the New York World's Fair and adapted for street use.Contents1 Definition 2 Legal position 3 Parking 4 Handling and performance 5 Electric microcars 6 Microcars by country of origin 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksDefinition[edit]Smart Fortwo- This could be the smallest currently manufactured car with 4 wheels legally allowed in the US, but is not a microcar. The smart Fortwo would be classified as a subcompact. It is short, but all other dimensions and weights are too excessive to be a microcar.The definition of a microcar has varied considerably in different countries
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Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz
(German: [mɛʁˈtseːdəsˌbɛnts]) is a global automobile marque and a division of the German company Daimler AG. The brand is known for luxury vehicles, buses, coaches, and lorries. The headquarters is in Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg. The name first appeared in 1926 under Daimler-Benz. Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz
traces its origins to Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft's 1901 Mercedes and Karl Benz's 1886 Benz Patent-Motorwagen, which is widely regarded as the first gasoline-powered automobile
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Cadillac
Cadillac
Cadillac
/ˈkædɪlæk/, formally the Cadillac
Cadillac
Motor Car Division, is a division of the U.S.-based General Motors
General Motors
(GM) that markets luxury vehicles worldwide. Its primary markets are the United States, Canada, and China, but Cadillac-branded vehicles are distributed in 34 additional markets worldwide. Historically, Cadillac
Cadillac
automobiles have always held a place at the top of the luxury field within the United States.[2] In 2017, Cadillac's U.S. sales were 156,440 vehicles and its global sales were 356,467 vehicles.[3] Cadillac
Cadillac
is among the oldest automobile brands in the world, second in America only to fellow GM marque Buick. The firm was founded from the remnants of the Henry Ford Company
Henry Ford Company
in 1902.[4] It was named after Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac, who founded Detroit, Michigan
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Lincoln (automobile)
The Lincoln Motor Company
Lincoln Motor Company
(also known simply as Lincoln) is a division of the Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
that markets luxury vehicles under the Lincoln brand. Founded in 1917 by Henry M. Leland, Lincoln became a subsidiary of Ford in 1922.[5] In 2012, with the discontinuation of the Mercury line, Lincoln was rebranded as the "Lincoln Motor Company" to help differentiate its cars from the Fords on which they are based.[6][7] The product line currently includes sedans, crossovers, sport utility vehicles, and versions for limousine/livery use. They are marketed primarily in North America
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Handling
Handling stolen goods is the name of a statutory offence in England and Wales and Northern Ireland. It takes place after a theft or other dishonest acquisition is completed and may be committed by a fence or other person who helps the thief to realise the value of the stolen goods
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Muscle Car
Muscle car
Muscle car
is an American term used to refer to a variety of high-performance automobiles.[1] The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines muscle cars as "any of a group of American-made 2-door sports cars with powerful engines designed for high-performance driving."[2] A large V8 engine
V8 engine
is fitted in a 2-door, rear wheel drive, family-style compact, mid-size or full-size car designed for four or more passengers
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Coupe
A coupé, or coupe in North America (from the French past participle coupé, of the infinitive couper, to cut), is a car with a fixed-roof body style that is shorter than a sedan or saloon (British and Irish English) of the same model.[1] The precise definition of the term varies between manufacturers and over time,[2] but often, a coupé will only seat two people and have two doors; though it may have rear seating and rear doors for additional passengers. The term was first applied to 19th-century carriages, where the rear-facing seats had been eliminated, or cut out.[2]Contents1 Pronunciation 2 History 3 Definitions and descriptions 4 Current usage 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksPronunciation[edit] In most English-speaking countries, the French spelling coupé and anglicized pronunciation /kuːˈpeɪ/ koo-PAY are used. The stress may be equal or on either the first or second syllable; stressing the first syllable is the more anglicized variant
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Car
A car (or automobile) is a wheeled motor vehicle used for transportation. Most definitions of car say they run primarily on roads, seat one to eight people, have four tires, and mainly transport people rather than goods.[2][3] Cars came into global use during the 20th century, and developed economies depend on them. The year 1886 is regarded as the birth year of the modern car when German inventor Karl Benz built his Benz Patent-Motorwagen. Cars became widely available in the early 20th century. One of the first cars that were accessible to the masses was the 1908 Model T, an American car manufactured by the Ford
Ford
Motor Company. Cars were rapidly adopted in the US, where they replaced animal-drawn carriages and carts, but took much longer to be accepted in Western Europe and other parts of the world. Cars have controls for driving, parking, passenger comfort and safety, and controlling a variety of lights
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City Car
A city car (also known as urban car or a mini) is a small car[2] designed to be used primarily in urban areas[3] and conurbations. The term is used along with other terms for small cars including subcompact in North America. The Euro NCAP
Euro NCAP
calls all small cars superminis.[4] The European Commission
European Commission
refers to A-segment (Utility/city class: entry level small passenger car).[5] In Japan, the kei car is a specific type of small car.Contents1 Internal combustion engine
Internal combustion engine
city cars1.1 Early history 1.2 The boom 1.3 Larger city cars2 See also 3 References 4 External links Internal combustion engine
Internal combustion engine
city cars[edit] Early history[edit] The original concept for the city car came about as a result of the growing market for entry level vehicles in the 1920s and 1930s
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Vauxhall VXR8
The Vauxhall VXR8
Vauxhall VXR8
was a performance car marketed by Vauxhall in the United Kingdom based on two different models produced by Holden Special
Special
Vehicles: the HSV Clubsport
HSV Clubsport
(2007–2009) and HSV GTS (2010–2017). The VXR8 is the successor to both the Monaro VXR
VXR
and the Vauxhall Omega/Carlton, initially powered by a 411bhp Gen IV LS2 6.0 litre V8. From late-2009 the VXR8 was upgraded to the 425bhp Gen IV LS3 6.2 litre V8 with 425bhp shared with the Chevrolet Corvette C6 and the Chevrolet Camaro SS. In 2009, the 425bhp VXR8 Bathurst and supercharged 552bhp 'S' editions were offered using the same Gen IV LS2 V8 but with a Walkinshaw Performance supercharger in the Bathurst S
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Kei Car
Kei car, K-car, or kei jidōsha (軽自動車, lit. "light automobile") (pronounced [keːdʑidoːɕa]), is a Japanese category of small vehicles, including passenger cars (kei cars or kei-class cars), microvans, and pickup trucks (kei trucks or kei-class trucks). They are designed to comply with Japanese government tax and insurance regulations, and in most rural areas are exempted from the requirement to certify that adequate parking is available for the vehicle.[2][3][4] This especially advantaged class of cars was developed to popularize motorization in the postwar era
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Subcompact Car
A subcompact car is the American term for an automobile with a class size smaller than a compact car[1] usually not exceeding 165 inches (4,191 mm) in length, but larger than a microcar. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency
United States Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA), a passenger car is classified as subcompact if it has between 85 cubic feet (2,407 L) and 99 cu ft (2,803 L) of interior volume.[2] The subcompact segment equates roughly to A-segment
A-segment
and B-segment
B-segment
in Europe, or city car and supermini in British terminology. In 2012, the New York Times described the differences, saying "today’s small cars actually span three main segments in the global vehicle market. The tiny A-segment
A-segment
cars include the Chevrolet Spark
Chevrolet Spark
and Smart Fortwo. They are short and light
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